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Author Topic: Hepatica 2021  (Read 38254 times)

Gabriela

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #660 on: September 19, 2021, 09:07:36 PM »
Ashley and Maggi: what I was trying to say was that not that many people in the forum have an inclination of the heart, if I can call it like this, for Hepatica.

At least, not in the same amount like for other groups of plants, like: various bulbs and Galanthus to mention just two of them. Of course that many people, including not from the forum, are clicking on this thread and maybe find things to learn which is a good thing.

It was an observation and I stand by it, please don't 'shoot the messenger'. Even in the spring we can count on ten fingers the people posting here. It is fine with me, I don't understand the reaction actually.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Leena

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #661 on: September 20, 2021, 09:52:15 AM »
Hepatica threads are so informative, I read them many times over and over:). And admire the pictures when waiting for the new  flowers and spring.
I think actually Hepaticas flower quite long in the spring, comparing for instance with some peonies which may flower only a few days. Hepaticas may flower a few weeks if the weather stays cool.
I'm so happy that I have been able to grow them from seeds and also for all the plants I have got from somewhere else.

Also here Hepatica buds are swelling, some more than others, and always in the autumn I fear that winter will be too cold for them (especially H.japonicas) when they are so exposed above ground, but so far all have survived. I guess it is more the too much wet that is more damaging them than cold.

Leena from south of Finland

Leena

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #662 on: November 06, 2021, 05:19:11 PM »
I am a bit worried when some Hepatica leaves have turned red, especially H.japonica in the first picture.
I know that for instance last winter one of my native pink H.nobilis had red leaves with no harm to the plant, but I wonder what causes this?

Then some pictures of Hepatica seedlings. In the third picture there is H.americana  on top and H.acutiloba below, and all the latter plants have this kind of variegated leaves now.
In the last picture there are H.acutiloba plants, and one on the top right is even totally red in leaves..
Leena from south of Finland

Carolyn

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #663 on: November 06, 2021, 07:05:42 PM »
Leena,
Could it be that the hepatica leaves had too much sun this summer? I noticed leaves on some of mine turning red and moved the pots into total shade on the north side of our house. The UV levels seemed very high this summer, certainly in Scotland.
The seeds which you sent me have provided me with nice plants with healthy looking buds for next spring. Thank you!
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Herman Mylemans

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #664 on: November 07, 2021, 08:39:14 AM »
Leena, nice to see some Hepatica's.
The color of the leaves probably has to do with the weather, just like Carolyn says.
So you can keep Hepatica japonica alive outdoors! Here they always disappear after a few years.
In the garden the Hepatica buds are swelling and getting ready for spring, but winter is yet to come.
It certainly has to wait until the end of January to see some flowers. But we're looking forward to it!
Belgium

Leena

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #665 on: November 07, 2021, 09:15:55 AM »
Thanks Carolyn and Herman:).
These plants grow under an apple tree so they get mostly shade, but maybe also some sun, when there are no leaves in trees.
It is good to hear that it may not be bad, and after next year, I know more how the same plants react later.

Herman, I have grown the first H.japonica from seeds and they have been outside since 2015, so that is now six years.
In spring 2019 I planted named cultivars and they are mostly doing very well so far, but that is now only three years experience. Some disappeared the first winter, so it was probably my fault more than plants. I am still learning to grow these plants.

Carolyn, I'm so happy the seeds germinated and grew well, and I hope there is some variation in blue and pink flowers :).

Hepatica buds are also here now big, and I fear for them when they are so exposed to the weather, but so far the buds have gone through winters undamaged.
It will be nice to see your Hepatica flowers in January and February when mine are still under snow (hopefully).
Leena from south of Finland

Gabriela

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #666 on: November 12, 2021, 11:28:49 PM »
Leena: it seems that the more sun the Hepatica plants are getting, the more chances are for the leaves to turn reddish or marbled.
At least speaking about H. americana and H. acutiloba. In H. acutiloba some plants can get completely reddish leaves, especially when the weather turns cold.
Even the seedlings will show this character, like the seedlings from 'Purple Star' (also on the back side the leaves are purplish).


H. acutiloba fo. rosea also is getting more marbled with more light exposure. I divided two large clumps in late summer and with this occasion replanted it in a spot with more light. In deep shade the leaves will remain green.


But it must be also a genetic factor involved, because in the wild populations, for the same sun exposure, some plants keep their leaves green while others get marbled. I don't have many pictures of this year, but see few H. americana. First is the #1 which always gets colorful, others are in the same location, one perfectly green and one with colored leaves.





It also seems that the anthocyans responsible for the color may also have a role in protection against low temperatures in some plants. They are only produced toward late summer and are formed depending on the breakdown of sugars in the presence of light (which also leads to the trees fall red leaves, although there are other pigments involved as well). So, all in all, there is nothing to be worried about.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Leena

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #667 on: November 13, 2021, 04:11:10 PM »
It also seems that the anthocyans responsible for the color may also have a role in protection against low temperatures in some plants. They are only produced toward late summer and are formed depending on the breakdown of sugars in the presence of light (which also leads to the trees fall red leaves, although there are other pigments involved as well). So, all in all, there is nothing to be worried about.

Thank you Gabriela, that makes sense! I will have to make a note to myself which plants are more marbled or red leaves now, and then compare next autumn.
I think there are couple of H.americana which have more red leaves than the others. And 'Millstream Merlin' has now also redder leaves.
I also noticed today that 'Louise Kohler' has quite red leaves now. Most of my native H.nobilis have green leaves.
Here are two H.acutiloba plants growing close to each other and the other ones is stronger marbled than the other one.

Leena from south of Finland

mellifera

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Re: Hepatica 2021
« Reply #668 on: November 17, 2021, 09:41:22 PM »
An early first tiny flower. Not the most beautiful one. I think  there will come better flowers from H. jap. 'Yumengokoti'

 


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