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Author Topic: Asplenium rhizophyllum  (Read 1699 times)

Gabriela

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Asplenium rhizophyllum
« on: August 21, 2020, 06:59:28 PM »
A lucky find which is worth showing - a large boulder covered with a nice colony of Asplenium rhizophyllum, the walking fern. This species is found only limestone or dolomite boulders in Ontario and Quebec (and more states in US).
It reproduces clonal with the elongated leaf tips acting like 'stolons' and also by spores.




Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

cohan

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2020, 09:12:24 PM »
Very cool! No boulders in my immediate area, and not many ferns.. this would be fun to re-create in the garden :)

Gabriela

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2020, 01:09:45 PM »
Thanks Cohan. This was not close to my home unfortunately. And, it is too dry in SW Ontario to try to reproduce the sight. But for those living in a bit cooler region and with more humidity is definitely something worth trying!
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
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cohan

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2020, 02:30:32 PM »
Certainly not dry here, this year, but next year, who knows?  lol.. I'd probably have some concerns about winter shelter, too- probably need a site with no wind exposure or something... the biggest problem here would be getting a suitable boulder ;) second would be getting the ferns/spores...lol

Hoy

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2020, 08:02:10 PM »
A lucky find which is worth showing - a large boulder covered with a nice colony of Asplenium rhizophyllum, the walking fern. This species is found only limestone or dolomite boulders in Ontario and Quebec (and more states in US).
It reproduces clonal with the elongated leaf tips acting like 'stolons' and also by spores.


A very interesting fern. Nothing like it here!

But I have very moist climate and lots of boulders around. Not limestone though :)
« Last Edit: August 22, 2020, 08:03:46 PM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Rick R.

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2020, 08:55:53 PM »
I have seen this species too, on east bluff sides near the Mississippi River in southeast Minnesota.  I find them on moss covered limestone rock, too.  I remember thinking what an interesting habitat, as they never ventured off the rock substrate into surrounding soil.
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Gabriela

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2020, 08:14:19 PM »
Certainly not dry here, this year, but next year, who knows?  lol.. I'd probably have some concerns about winter shelter, too- probably need a site with no wind exposure or something... the biggest problem here would be getting a suitable boulder ;) second would be getting the ferns/spores...lol

Hardiness may be a bigger problem maybe Cohan; as far as the boulders you don't need to use such a larger one. Anything smaller in size can work; you could practice with Polypodium virginianum first :) Too dry for it here as well. I still have it but is not very happy.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Gabriela

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2020, 08:18:51 PM »
A very interesting fern. Nothing like it here!

But I have very moist climate and lots of boulders around. Not limestone though :)

Yes, I think your climate is right Trond. I've read an account of the species, which is more frequently growing in US, and apparently any alkaline substrate will work. Also they say that in rare occasions was found growing on the ground (probably thin on top of rocks) and on decayed logs.

Rick - see what I answered to Trond. Here it was only growing on boulders though.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

cohan

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2020, 07:59:49 PM »
Hardiness may be a bigger problem maybe Cohan; as far as the boulders you don't need to use such a larger one. Anything smaller in size can work; you could practice with Polypodium virginianum first :) Too dry for it here as well. I still have it but is not very happy.

I wouldn't think they would 'need' the big rock, but that is the biggest part of the fun ;) I don't really have limestone (very small pieces in the mixed glacial stone around here.. of course it could be bought, but that is another issue), though when artificially grown, they might not care that much? I find many plants in the garden are much more adaptable compared to very specific niches in nature-- eg I have a couple of plants from the Dolomites happy in mixed stone (my soil is probably basic enough).

Gabriela

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2020, 07:03:04 PM »
I wouldn't think they would 'need' the big rock, but that is the biggest part of the fun ;) I don't really have limestone (very small pieces in the mixed glacial stone around here.. of course it could be bought, but that is another issue), though when artificially grown, they might not care that much? I find many plants in the garden are much more adaptable compared to very specific niches in nature-- eg I have a couple of plants from the Dolomites happy in mixed stone (my soil is probably basic enough).

Some species are more adaptable than others in the garden Cohan but in general the ones with a very strict substrate requirement don't usually fall in this category.
Saxicole fern species especially, are very hard to grow in soil or a different type of rock. This is the reason why some are growing localized, or are/become rare, just because they require a particular habitat.

Besides A. rhizophyllum and Polypodium virginianum, A. scolopendrium var. americana, A. ruta-muraria and Polystichum lonchitis are few other such examples.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

cohan

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2020, 06:19:22 AM »
Those will be the sort of plants hardest hit by climate change...little chance for them to move...

Tristan_He

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2020, 03:32:55 PM »
Those will be the sort of plants hardest hit by climate change...little chance for them to move...

Certainly specialists will tend to be hit by climate change, and many have already been hit hard by habitat destruction. On the other hand some of these ferns are pretty good dispersers via spores, and therefore seem good at 'finding' suitable habitat. Species with poor dispersal mechanisms (e.g. ant dispersed seed that rarely moves between populations) seem very vulnerable.

On a side note, it has just occurred to me that although I have seen thousands of A. ruta-muraria growing in walls around the place, I don't think I have ever seen it in the wild! Presumably it likes limestone rock crevices..?
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 09:43:52 AM by Tristan_He »

Hoy

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2020, 05:55:24 PM »

.....

On a side note, it has just occurred to me that although I have seen thousands of A. ruta-muraria growing in walls around the place, I don't think I have ever seen it in the wild! Presumably it likes limestone rock crevices..?


It is common where I live both oin walls and in crevices (in limestone).

672357-0
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Gabriela

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2020, 01:14:38 AM »
Those will be the sort of plants hardest hit by climate change...little chance for them to move...

I tend to agree more with Tristan's line of thought Cohan. Species with a 'healthy' propagation via seeds/spores are/will be the least affected. Then, from what I've seen both in North America and Europe, destruction/loss of habitat due to human activity is one of the biggest threats for species conservation (which A. rhizophyllum is not anyway).
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Gabriela

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Re: Asplenium rhizophyllum
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2020, 01:17:53 AM »

On a side note, it has just occurred to me that although I have seen thousands of A. ruta-muraria growing in walls around the place, I don't think I have ever seen it in the wild! Presumably it likes limestone rock crevices..?

A. ruta-muraria can also be common in various localities of Carpathian Mts - yes, limestone crevices; including in walls of nearby houses. Here's a picture I had handy from last year.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

 


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