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Author Topic: Some plants I encounter in Norway.  (Read 16004 times)

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #120 on: September 29, 2020, 08:55:06 PM »
Back to plants...

Some are still in flower, in fact, many have experienced a new spring this fall. A few cool days and night in August and a rather mild September have lured the plants to flower anew.

Geranium sanguineum.

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Red clover, Trifolium pratense, and peacock, Aglais io.

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The tormentil, Potentilla erecta, is very common everywhere.  Those growing in the pastures here are smaller than those from other places.

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Juniper, Juniperus communis. Yes it is still alive!

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Scotch rose, Rosa spinosissima, is native and you find it along the west coast.

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« Last Edit: September 29, 2020, 08:59:32 PM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

cohan

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #121 on: October 02, 2020, 06:52:04 AM »
Thanks-- I'd like to try Hedera again, but I will wait-- I still don't know what/where I am doing, so I am not sowing anything the last couple of seasons!

I think the time to bail out that boat is past...lol
Is that Sorbus entire leafed?
I had G sanguineum from your seed flowering this year, very small so far, but that could be the site, also.. I don't mind if it does stay small though..
Trifolium pratense also still flowering here-- there is a reason why such weeds are so successful! Actually I find them most visually irritating at this time (or a little later), since they stay fully green when all sensible plants have gone brown, gold,. red or to sleep...lol

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #122 on: October 02, 2020, 09:00:17 PM »
Cohan,

G sanguineum likes limestone/chalk. It usually grows in rich and a little dry soil.
Yes, the Sorbus has entire leaves. We have quite a few species of that kind.

i am at the mountain cabin now and here almost all the T pratense plants have shut down for the winter!
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Gabriela

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #123 on: October 03, 2020, 01:53:09 AM »
Love the Betula-boat picture Trond but the one with Juniperus communis is even better! what an amazing species, it manage to survive in the most inhospitable places.


Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Rick R.

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #124 on: October 03, 2020, 02:31:33 AM »
The Sorbus caught my eye, too, because it is simple leaved (not pinnate).  No berries?  Or have they already been eaten...

A wonderous juniper specimen, too!
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #125 on: October 03, 2020, 07:52:55 AM »
Gabriela and Rick,

Junipers are nice shrubs! We have only one species but you will find it from the seaside and high up in the mountains. Some are prostrate and others are tree-like. The tallest specimen recorded was 17 m.


Sorbus rupicola is one of several entire-leaved Sorbus species here. This year was a bad one for berries on all Sorbus species.

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« Last Edit: October 03, 2020, 08:00:37 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

cohan

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #126 on: October 03, 2020, 06:57:08 PM »
So far I have not given much thought to how acid or basic my soils are--- though some plants get more clay and gravel, others more humus etc, of course.. most things have not minded, could be a few here and there that might have liked something else!

Does S rupicola stay small? Doesn't seem like a name for a large tree.. My S aucuparia had few berries this year too, maybe a late frost or something..

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #127 on: October 06, 2020, 04:29:07 PM »

.........

Does S rupicola stay small? Doesn't seem like a name for a large tree.. My S aucuparia had few berries this year too, maybe a late frost or something..

Yes, rupicola stays small. Either as a little tree or a multi stemmed shrub.

Most Sorbuses had few berries this year. Cotoneasters were loaded!
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

cohan

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #128 on: October 06, 2020, 07:35:26 PM »
I saw berries on Sorbus in town, yesterday.. of course different micro-climates, and  always funny to me that they still have berries this late...lol

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #129 on: October 12, 2020, 07:17:43 PM »
I saw berries on Sorbus in town, yesterday.. of course different micro-climates, and  always funny to me that they still have berries this late...lol

Rowan berries usually last for months here, especially if it is other berries also!
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #130 on: October 12, 2020, 07:26:36 PM »
Been out for a walk here today https://g.acdn.no/obscura/API/dynamic/r1/ece5/tr_1080_714_l_f/0000/krag/2016/8/31/10/Jomfruland%2Bdir.jpg?chk=60C392

https://www.kv.no/nyheter/jomfruland-nasjonalpark/kragero/direktoratet-anbefaler-opprettelse-av-nasjonalpark/s/5-63-45247


A windflower (Anemone nemorosa) has got it all wrong!

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Hieracium umbellatum, always a late bloomer.

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A birch tree (Betula verrucosa) formed by the wind.

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The stems of common spruce (Picea abies). It is one clone.

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Common spruce (Picea abies).

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« Last Edit: October 12, 2020, 07:36:00 PM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #131 on: October 12, 2020, 07:41:35 PM »
The path

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Pilosella peleteriana

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Macrolepiota sp

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Brambles

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« Last Edit: October 12, 2020, 07:46:34 PM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #132 on: October 14, 2020, 08:24:17 PM »
Crossed the mountains yesterday in very nice weather, sun and +5C at 1100m "late" evening, just at sunset New snow only at the highest summits (>1200m). Had no time to take photographs though.

Nice weather back home also, down to +2C during the night. No frost yet in the garden.

Some plats still in flower:

Fuchsia magellanica from seed (Chileflora). It tolerates a few degrees below 0C.

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Prunus laurocerasus. Also from seed, this species is spread by birds and pop up many places. This specimen flowers twice, in spring and in fall.

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Geranium lambertii? Chadwell seeds many years ago. Flowers from spring till it gets too cold.

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At last can I see the flower buds of Fascicularia bicolour. It grows in a pot which have stood at the same spot for many years.

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Shortia soldanelloides shouldn't flower in several months!

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Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #133 on: October 26, 2020, 12:32:57 PM »
A Sunday stroll on the old Church Road. The "road" isn't in use anymore for the original purpose. Before the cars people had to walk, and cross 2 fjords to get to the church from where I live. The Avaldsnes church is about 750 years old. It is supposed that it has been churches here for about 1000 years. It is also the site where king Harald Hårfagre (Fairhair) (850-931) had one of his castles.

https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avaldsnes_kirke

Painting from 1820:

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We didn't walk all the way to the church though! (Had to have two boats then!)

We started at Aksnes where a creek enter the sea. Because of all the rain lately, the creek has been transformed to a river.




A lot of different trees and shrubs grow along the river. Some are foreign and didn't grow there n ancient times.
This one is native though, Viburnum opulus.




Where the water doesn't run so fast you'll find plants like this Potamogeton sp.




Struthiopteris/Blechnum spicant, the hard fern, is very common on drier sites.





« Last Edit: October 26, 2020, 12:38:07 PM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Some plants I encounter in Norway.
« Reply #134 on: October 26, 2020, 01:00:43 PM »
This grass, Molinia caerulea, is common here.




Birches, junipers and shrubs like Salix aurita are common also.




Sphagnum moss is everywhere. It is several species.




Polytrichum commune is also everywhere.




Junipers differ in form. The upright growing ones are rare because they have been used for fence poles and much other.

« Last Edit: October 26, 2020, 01:08:27 PM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

 


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