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Author Topic: The plant world of Patagonia  (Read 31992 times)

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #195 on: May 24, 2022, 09:29:57 AM »
Sisyrinchium humile in the Alpine House:

Hello Rudi

Sisyrinchium humile is now flowering in my garden too. However, it is in my rock garden all year round without any protection. So it seems to be immune to heat and winter wetness (?)... at least the picture doesn't show anything contrary...😉

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #196 on: May 24, 2022, 09:32:45 AM »
...the same applies to Sisyrinchium laetum, by the way. No protection...only loving care...😂

ruweiss

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #197 on: May 24, 2022, 08:41:07 PM »
Thomas, thank you for your pictures and your report. It is good to know about the hardiness of the
2 Sisyrinchium species and I will try it in my garden.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #198 on: May 26, 2022, 10:49:23 AM »
Patience is sometimes rewarded...first flower on Solenomelus segethii ...four years after sowing.

fermi de Sousa

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #199 on: May 26, 2022, 02:06:29 PM »
Our mate, Dave Toole, is presenting a talk on Central Patagonia by zoom for the Alpine Garden Society Victorian Group (Australia) on Saturday May 28th at 2pm Australian Eastern Standard Time (5am in Scotland!).
This is a free event and can be accessed through https://eventbrite.com.au/e/central-patagonia-land-of-fire-and-ice-tickets-346475516597
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

ashley

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #200 on: May 28, 2022, 06:57:28 AM »
Dave's talk and photos were excellent.  Look out for the recording if Fermi can make it available.
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #201 on: August 14, 2022, 12:24:06 PM »
In February 2019 I sowed Rhodophiala araucana.... Today a flower appeared. If there is anyone who knows the best about the life cycle of this species, I would be very grateful for any information. Especially the watering would be interesting for me.

Cheers
Thomas

ashley

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #202 on: August 14, 2022, 01:06:49 PM »
Thomas, could this be Habranthus tubispathus.
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #203 on: August 14, 2022, 01:25:37 PM »
Thomas, could this be Habranthus tubispathus.


Hi Ashley

Wonderful to hear from you...it's been a very long time...;-)

I think you are absolutely right...after some quick research on the internet, it might actually be Habranthus tubispathus. Although there are also some pictures of Rhodophiala araucana on the net that resemble my flower and I got the seed under that name....

Thank you so much for the correction...great.

ashley

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #204 on: August 14, 2022, 03:36:37 PM »
Great to hear from you too Thomas 8)

It's hard to be certain from the photos but seems likely.  Unfortunately H. tubispathus is a common imposter (see e.g. here), especially in the seed exchanges.
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Robert

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #205 on: August 14, 2022, 06:23:09 PM »
Hi Thomas,

For whatever it is worth, Habranthus tubispathus is weedy in containers in our Sacramento garden. As Ashley pointed out, I too have had this species turn up as an imposter grown from seed labeled as Rhodophiala from a seed exchange.



I grew this Rhodophiala montana from seed acquired from a seed exchange. It has been extremely easy to grow. It does not seem fussy about water as long as the soil drains well. I know very little about this Genus and I sure would like to learn more. Perhaps some Forumists can share some of their in depth knowledge on this Genus?
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos Robert Barnard

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Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #206 on: August 15, 2022, 05:44:48 AM »
Hi Ashley & Robert

A thousand thanks for pointing out that they are often Habranthus tubispathus when using the service of a seed exchange. I got the seeds from a good friend who probably got them that way.

This is one of the reasons why I hardly participate in seed exchanges any more. I prefer personal exchanges with friends...if only for emotional reasons. I think a long time ago we already had the pleasure in this respect.

It is probably a general "problem" with seed exchanges that sometimes something completely different emerges than desired. I don't know how many times I tried Silene hookeri, for example.... each time it was a different seed. I don't want to accuse anyone of malicious intent.

In my case, however, I am not at all disappointed...because I find this Habranthus tubispathus very lovely.

Robert

Your Rhodophiala montana is truly enchanting.... my admiration. But the accompanying plant on the left also makes my heart beat faster. The foliage looks very decorative. What is it?

Thomas

hamparstum

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #207 on: August 15, 2022, 11:36:59 AM »
 Hello everyone, I tried initially to find your Noid amaryllid, since here in my patch of Patagonia, Rhodophiala elwesii grows wild and sets seed. After looking for the Genus, to my dismay the genus Rhodophiala is no longer so. It has been superseded into Zephyrantes. Following that, my R.elwesii has been superseded into Zephyrantes gilliesiana. So this last name is what grows here. It is different from your picture. Apparently from my original botanical books, my local species is restricted to around the Nahuel Huapi lake. The spathes are pale yellow closer to Robert's R.montana=Z.montana. In bloom they keep a cup shaped form never opening the tips. They resemble a fluted glass.
If interested I can send you, Thomas, seeds of my species. It has a huge underground bulb very difficult to relocate ( why????). It requires deep sandy soil. The bulb grows very deep. About 25 cm deep the apex. It blooms in October and it dries up by Christmas. It first, late September, throws up a few (3/4) flat 5mm wide, but up to 25 cm long, thick leaves and then the bloom stalk appears.

Arturo
Arturo Tarak

 


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