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Author Topic: The plant world of Patagonia  (Read 31795 times)

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #165 on: February 16, 2019, 09:32:52 PM »
The filigree beauty of this cuttings of Bolax gummifera can only be seen under great magnification. It is again a "mutation" with a bluish coloration.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #166 on: April 13, 2019, 07:15:02 PM »
Draba antarctica has come well over the winter.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #167 on: May 11, 2019, 04:02:29 PM »
The tiny flowers of Azorella ameghinoi are so inconspicuous that you hardly notice them.  But a sign that she feels well...until now.

Steve Garvie

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #168 on: May 11, 2019, 08:27:11 PM »
Calceolaria uniflora -Iím not sure if this is the real deal or not. Raised from seed purchased from one of the Czech guys. It canít tolerate a Scottish winter in the open but is fine with overhead protection.
WILDLIFE PHOTOSTREAM: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rainbirder/


Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #169 on: May 11, 2019, 10:04:53 PM »
Hello Steve...

I am not a real specialist for the incredibly beautiful flora of Patagonia. I recognize on your photo a somewhat jagged edge of the leaves...is that correct ? It could be that Calceolaria darwinii produces different variants. I don't know. Fact is that you must be a very happy person. What a great glory.  ;D

I attach again some photos from the past...then you see the details of my former copies.

Steve Garvie

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #170 on: May 11, 2019, 11:16:12 PM »
Thanks Thomas.
Looking at your images I donít think my plants can be the true darwinii/uniflora.
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Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #171 on: May 12, 2019, 09:46:52 AM »
Thanks Thomas.
Looking at your images I donít think my plants can be the true darwinii/uniflora.

Steve...
Your Calceolaria is perhaps a hybrid? Because I clearly recognize the white bar at the "lip".
Anyway, I am totally enthusiastic about the upright standing toothed foliage and the shape and colour of the flowers. The number of flowers is considerable.
I hope that you can harvest some valuable seeds and preserve this treasure.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #172 on: May 30, 2019, 11:04:09 AM »
For three years Calceolaria penellii has stood with me in the rock garden... without cover. This year she blooms for the first time... Viva Argentina 😎

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #173 on: June 01, 2019, 11:39:32 PM »
Does anyone here have any experience with the cultivation of Rhodophiala araucana? I was able to discover some seedlings today. My first idea would be a very permeable substrate with high lava content...in a high pot.

I am grateful for any hint... as always.

johnw

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #174 on: June 02, 2019, 03:50:28 AM »
No experience specifically to R. araucana though I grow it but haven't flowered it.  I initially got a Hippeastrum elwesii from Harry Jans that came from GŲteborg BG in 1996.  Later it was id'ed as Rhodophiala elwesii, a few years later R.araucana, then R. montana. I have a feeling it will change yet again.  In any event I have grown a dozen or more spp. since then and even flowered a few.  Your instincts are right - deep pot but don't overpot, neck of the bulb, once a good size, above the grit mulch.  They can havean extremely long neck so can pull themselves deep down. They take awhile to settle in when repotted - I must do all of mine this year.  An extremely well-drained mix with lots of grit and pumice seems to suit them.  I avoid peat for fear of stagnospora curtisii though have never seen it on them. Iif placing outdoors in summer be wary of the narcissuz bulb fly - i lost a very big pot of my first one which was a great flowerer as I set it outside for a week, the timing must have been perfect.  As the roots seem perennial I give all the ocassional drink during the dormant period despite advice against this. I've tried to gather information on the species requirements their growing periods - Chilaeflora/PBS and there was one site dedicated to Rhodophiala but it seems tpo have disappeared - and, that information is for the most part contradictory & suspect.  PBS says araucana spends the dormant period very dry under snow so should be able to tolerant a dry poeriod which may induce bud formation.  Good luck.

john.
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #175 on: June 02, 2019, 07:40:41 AM »
Hello John

Many thanks for the extensive information on further cultivation. Very well described and very helpful to me. Great.
I have sunk special pots for alpine plants (Townsendia, Acantholimon etc.) with very long roots in the sand.   I will mix a special substrate of lava, pumice and only very few humus components.

Thanks again
Thomas

johnw

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #176 on: June 03, 2019, 01:34:41 PM »
Thomas   - If plunging in a sand bed be aware the bulb may escape through the drainage hole.

john
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #177 on: June 03, 2019, 02:51:39 PM »
Thomas   - If plunging in a sand bed be aware the bulb may escape through the drainage hole.

john

John... what an important clue. Many thanks for that. So I will place a small piece of water permeable fleece between the drainage layer and the actual substrate. Then the bulb cannot flee.
This is exactly how I will proceed with Solenomelus segethii.

Thanks
Thomas

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #178 on: July 19, 2019, 04:18:47 PM »
Another newcomer from Chile...Acaena alpina. Here the foliage and the upright growth form is probably the special thing. If someone should have already experiences with it, I would be pleased about all information.

Thanks
Thomas

ashley

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #179 on: July 19, 2019, 04:51:43 PM »
Just take care Thomas  ;) ;D
Recently I found Acaena ovalifolia rapidly spreading along forestry roads as an invasive species :'(
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

 


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