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Author Topic: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand  (Read 111906 times)

Maggi Young

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #750 on: November 27, 2020, 03:39:49 PM »

I have never seen a Stellaria roughii that looks anything like your plant, Maggii. I think you must have pampered it too much which just goes to show growing alpines so they appear in context is not a trivial matter. Stellaria roughii dies back completely during winter and regrows when the snow disappears. Field notes; Stellaria roughii, common on mobile screes,1300 m, Hummock Peak, Eyre Mountains

Hardly  "pampered" here, David- surely  just  enjoying life  under  cold  glass  in Aberdeen, in the  days  when our  weather  was  altogether  colder !
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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ruweiss

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #751 on: November 27, 2020, 08:59:36 PM »
David, many thanks for showing us these beautiful plants.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #752 on: November 30, 2020, 09:30:44 AM »
Good morning folks,
So pleased to report that I have just discovered three or four minute seedlings of Lobelia roughii (a huge favourite of mine) ... and, having previously germinated and grown on this little gem for twelve months or so, am now eager to get these to flowering size here in Lancashire, UK.
I know that they thrive in a very pebbly scree of broken stone, but any tips for cultivation and preferences re: sun and moisture levels would be much appreciated please?


Congratulations on the successful germination...Cliff. I hope to report the same next spring. I have a total of four pots of Lobelia roughii in the current sowing.

Sometimes it is worth waiting...as the two photos show...😎

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #753 on: May 26, 2021, 09:00:03 AM »
Leucopogon fraseri...

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #754 on: June 25, 2021, 04:49:31 PM »
A question for the specialists here.

I have three specimens of Celmisia semicordata.... On one of them I have been observing a foamy liquid coming out of the underside of a leaf for two to three weeks. Initially I wiped it off.... but it appears again. Does anyone know this behaviour? Is it a disease?

The other two specimens do not show this phenomenon.

I would rather the Celmisias were bubbling over with happiness...as they say here...:-)

I am grateful for any information...

Greetings
Thomas

Maggi Young

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #755 on: June 25, 2021, 04:53:35 PM »
A question for the specialists here.

I have three specimens of Celmisia semicordata.... On one of them I have been observing a foamy liquid coming out of the underside of a leaf for two to three weeks. Initially I wiped it off.... but it appears again. Does anyone know this behaviour? Is it a disease?

The other two specimens do not show this phenomenon.

I would rather the Celmisias were bubbling over with happiness...as they say here...:-)

I am grateful for any information...

Greetings
Thomas
bThis looks like what we call "cuckoo spit" - albeit a bad case  - read  more  here  https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/wildlife-guides/other-garden-wildlife/insects-and-other-invertebrates/beetles-and-bugs/froghopper/
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #756 on: July 16, 2021, 02:29:11 PM »
Gentianella corymbifera flowers for the first time this year. Sown in winter 2017.


I think it was worth the wait...😏


Lesley Cox

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #757 on: July 16, 2021, 10:21:36 PM »
Yes, Maggi is right, it is "Cuckoo spit" a disgusting foam from the froghopper insect and the information you'll get on clicking the link Maggi gave, says it all except, that the immature insect and when you are most likely to see it, is bright green, rather than brown. It is very common in NZ and perhaps in Germany and many other places but relatively harmless I think, though I did once see a whole field of maybe 20 acres or more which appeared white, there was so much of the foam. In the green stage the insect is slow-moving can easily be seen with foam and squashed but as it turns brown it hardens and moves quickly and tends to jump away if pursued. It appears in NZ from early October through summer. It is unseen after that but eggs must be present and hide somewhere through the winter, to become froghoppers in the following spring or else, where does it come from???
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #758 on: November 16, 2021, 10:14:22 AM »
Here are a few photos from my first alpine field trip of the new season. Location was the Rock and Pillar Range inland from Dunedin The snow had all gone but there was not a lot in flower.

Caltha obtusa a classic snowbank plant that flowers as soon as the snow covering it melts


Hebejeebie (Veronica) densifolia a lovely plant when flowering


Montitega dealbata often confused with Pentachondra pumila


Ranunculus gracilipes a small buttercup widespread in alpine bogs


Ranunculus enysii another widespread alpine buttercup which can be quite variable
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #759 on: November 17, 2021, 11:43:49 AM »
Montitega dealbata was completely unknown to me until now... Simply enchanting, David.

Thanks for showing...

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #760 on: November 20, 2021, 09:19:58 AM »
Hello Thomas,

I have not been out in the field much this season. It is perhaps still a bit early to see much in flower. I was in Central Otago today and there are still snowbanks on the Old Man Range so the Calthas and other snowbank plants should be emerging and flowering. I was given a nice plant of Raoulia australis and another of Raoulia beauverdii. My friend had them all potted up in planter bags and was growing them like cabbages. I will take some photos tomorrow and post them.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #761 on: November 22, 2021, 07:58:34 AM »
Her is a photo of the Raoulia australis I was given. It is about to flower


I was also given a plant of Raoulia beauverdii which another Central Otago species. It is similar to Raoulia apicinigra but is a lowland plant. R. apicinigra is more  a low to high alpine plant.


I took a quick wander round the garden to see what was in flower. I am rather taken by this Leptinella. I identified it as Leptinella albida when I originally collected it with Stuart Murray on the Pisa Range. Looking at it now I am not so sure. I think it may be Leptinella pectinata subsp villosa. It is doing rather well and is quite attractive with its pinkish flowers.
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David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #762 on: November 22, 2021, 08:20:19 AM »
Here is Anaphalioides bellidioides. It has really taken over a corner of my crevice garden and is a mass of white flowers every year.


Another consistent performer Celmisia bellidioides  growing in the dampest coolest spot I could find for it.


Carmichaelia corrugata
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and Carmichaelia astonii
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Viola cunninghamii. It is very happy to seed itself around the garden. If you are going to have weeds you need to encourage the native ones rather than the exotic ones. Those of you with sharp eyes will see Cardamine heleniae another native weed which we have gifted to the world growing up through the Viola. On the left is a fragment of Epilobium nummularifolium another NZ native weed which has become naturalised in north-western USA. There is Epilobium brunnescens in that bed as well which I believe is naturalised in parts of Britain. I have weeded most of it out so it is not in the photo.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #763 on: November 22, 2021, 08:34:42 AM »
Here are three subantarctic plants which I have managed to grow
Myosotis capitata The plant grows well during the winter but tends to suffer a bit in summer.
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Azorella lyallii formerly known as Stilbocarpa lyallii. There is a little bit on Stewart Island but it tends to get eaten out by deer (and rats)


Bulbinella rossii This has surprised me by growing quite well and flowering. I had another plant which never really thrived. I suspect this one is not going to like warm summer days so the flower head may not develop properly.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ranunculus

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #764 on: November 22, 2021, 10:20:06 AM »
Hi David,

Lovely to know that you are still growing and flowering some superb plants!  Your image of Myosotis capitata brings back happy memories, I used to grow and flower these so well here in Lancashire and exhibited them a number of times at the shows, but haven't seen it here for quite a number of years now.  Best regards to you and the alpine fraternity down under ... seems a long, long time since we hiked together to see Ranunculus crithmifolius in full flower.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

 


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