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Author Topic: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand  (Read 111865 times)

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #735 on: November 19, 2020, 04:13:44 AM »
Thomas,

Do you start your plants from seed? I have tried Celmisia from seed several times but find it difficult even to germinate them!

Hi Trond

Please excuse the late answer...there is a lot to do in the garden at the moment. The sowing is in full swing and at the same time I have to sink countless pots in the covered sand bed before winter comes.

I have also had different results with the sowing of Celmisia & Co. Some species have germinated very well, others very little and many have not germinated at all yet. I have sown at different times... immediately after receipt (in the European summer, as well as in November). Celmisia gracilenta germinated best so far. However, I have also received some species as pricked young plants or bought them from Ardfearn. My goal is to "produce" as much as possible myself... but it still remains a game of chance

Cheers
Thomas

Hoy

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #736 on: November 19, 2020, 08:20:05 AM »
Thank you for your answer, Thomas.

Seems I just have to continue trying!


Nice seedlings!
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

t00lie

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #737 on: November 23, 2020, 07:41:08 AM »
Lovely to see your success with germinating Celmisia Thomas. C. coriacea particularly is a smashing species when seen in the wild with its striking orange midrib.

Celmisia sps 'grassy leaved' is reliable each season with its flowers and makes good sized growths...

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while a recent gift from a friend of a cutting of C.philocremna I suspect will take time... ;)









« Last Edit: November 23, 2020, 07:50:16 AM by t00lie »
Dave Toole. Invercargill bottom of the South Island New Zealand. Zone 9 maritime climate 1100mm rainfall pa.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #738 on: November 24, 2020, 10:26:23 AM »
I have Mr Toole to thank for this specimen of Celmisia philocremna ----

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David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #739 on: November 24, 2020, 10:46:34 AM »
Fantastic... David. I especially like the typical thick floured stem of this species. Also Carmichaelia on the right side is very beautiful.

Yann

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #740 on: November 24, 2020, 02:59:49 PM »
I admire all these species ungrowable on my side.
North of France

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #741 on: November 25, 2020, 07:22:25 PM »
Hello Thomas, Yann,

I have mixed success with growing Celmisias and have lost many good plants over the years. Celmisia philocremna has survived so far and I have a second smaller plant grown from a cutting of the original. There is a huge amount of variation in some of the species and hybrids are very common. The woody shrubby ones grow easily from cuttings but the larger tufted ones (Celmisia semicordata) can not be grown this way and are much harder to propagate and keep in cultivation.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Véronique Macrelle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #742 on: November 26, 2020, 06:10:04 AM »
I also tried several times to sow it, and I concluded like Yann: even if it germinates, I do not go much further than the seedlings. it's too complicated for our climate.
but it is so beautiful :P

ranunculus

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #743 on: November 26, 2020, 08:23:27 AM »
Good morning folks,
So pleased to report that I have just discovered three or four minute seedlings of Lobelia roughii (a huge favourite of mine) ... and, having previously germinated and grown on this little gem for twelve months or so, am now eager to get these to flowering size here in Lancashire, UK.
I know that they thrive in a very pebbly scree of broken stone, but any tips for cultivation and preferences re: sun and moisture levels would be much appreciated please?
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Maggi Young

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #744 on: November 26, 2020, 11:55:19 AM »
Good morning folks,
So pleased to report that I have just discovered three or four minute seedlings of Lobelia roughii (a huge favourite of mine) ... and, having previously germinated and grown on this little gem for twelve months or so, am now eager to get these to flowering size here in Lancashire, UK.
I know that they thrive in a very pebbly scree of broken stone, but any tips for cultivation and preferences re: sun and moisture levels would be much appreciated please?
I get  confused- it  was  Stellaria roughii that we  grew - it  died  after  flowering  and we  got  no seed- so I'm not  much help - but  we  did  love  it  while  we  had  it!


Stellaria roughii form the  Craigieburn Range
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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ranunculus

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #745 on: November 26, 2020, 04:07:35 PM »
Another small gem from similar locations, Maggi ... and congratulations on growing such a fine example.  So many very  special plants from these fabulous mountains. x
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #746 on: November 27, 2020, 02:29:46 AM »
Hello Cliff, Maggi,



Field notes for Lobelia roughii are; occasional plants on mobile screes, 1550 m, Hawkdun Range. Beneath the top mobile layer the scree is quite silty/fine and packed quite. hard.  Possibly a bit hard to replicate in a domestic garden. I would use a fairly gritty mix and grow in an open, sunny position and not let it completely dry out.

I have never seen a Stellaria roughii that looks anything like your plant, Maggii. I think you must have pampered it too much which just goes to show growing alpines so they appear in context is not a trivial matter. Stellaria roughii dies back completely during winter and regrows when the snow disappears. Field notes; Stellaria roughii, common on mobile screes,1300 m, Hummock Peak, Eyre Mountains

« Last Edit: November 27, 2020, 02:34:09 AM by David Lyttle »
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #747 on: November 27, 2020, 08:46:59 AM »
This must be the ugliest plant I have ever bought. ( from Hokonui Alpines)



However this year it redeemed itself by producing and amazing crop of violet flowers.







I am guessing it is a hybrid between Carmichaelia nana and a shrubby, wild plant growing nearby (Carmichaelia petriei?)
Compare with Carmichaelia monroi. This plant was grown from seed and still has some of its juvenile foliage. In the wild it is usually pruned down to ground level by hares so you don't see flowers very often.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #748 on: November 27, 2020, 09:02:22 AM »
I have several other dwarf Carmichaelia species. This one is Carmichaelia astonii which grows on limestone.

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My Helichrysum intermedium var tumidum which I showed in a previous post is now in full flower.



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I also have another Helichrysum, Helichrysum plumeum. Quite a different plant. Its in a pot and I am a bit wary of planting it into the open garden. The branches are covered in white tomentum and the flowers are yellow rather than white.

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David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #749 on: November 27, 2020, 09:16:29 AM »
Celmisia bellidioides more or less completely covered in flowers



An Anaphalioides hybrid that arose spontaneously in my garden.



Mazus radicans which will possibly take over the whole bed.



Coprosma atropurpurea which produces wine-coloured berries in flower.  I just recently planted it out and it seems to be thriving.



Last Ourisia macrocarpa. This is the first time I grown this. It grows only in Fiordland generally in high rainfall areas. Typically it produces a cluster of flowers on an elongated stem rather than the single flower in this photo.

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David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

 


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