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Author Topic: Kelseya uniflora  (Read 5316 times)

Fumi

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Kelseya uniflora
« on: December 19, 2006, 04:23:04 AM »
Can someone advise me on how to grow this species from seeds?  I'd gotten a packet of seeds last year which, to my surprise, germinated quite readily in my basement before I had a chance to expose them to some cold.  We were still looking at another 2 months of sub-zero temp so I kept them inside (15C min/22C max) but they all eventually died out before Spring arrived.

Seeds were sown in a 50-50 mixture (roughly) of grits and peat humu.  I watered the pot almost every other other day but sometimes with a break of 2 or 3 days in between.  None got far enough to transplant them unless they needed to be transplanted into a different mixture early.

Any way, this pot of seeds was kept and I'd put them out this time to see if there are anything left from last year.  I also got another packet of seeds for this species.  This time, if I'm lucky and have more germination, I'd like to at least see them survive the first few months and hopefully longer!
Fumi Nishida - Midland, Michigan (USDA Zone 5)

hadacekf

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2006, 01:50:16 PM »
I already breed plants for 40 years.  I place the pots outside in good light, with the pots open to the weather, including frost, and I do not allow them to dry out.
I sow Kelseya uniflora the first time 1992. From 1992 to 1998 I did sow each year seed however it germinated not. 1999 germinated the seed which I sowed 1998. These plants grow currently in a large tuff and have a diameter of  2 - 3cm.
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

Franz Hadacek's Alpines And Bulbs
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Fumi

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2006, 02:46:41 AM »
Hi Franz,
Thank you for sharing your experience.  It seems that I was lucky last year getting good germination rate.  I hope I'd be as successful this year.

I'd heard that this was slow growing species but didn't realize that it was that slow.  Are you still maintaining some moisture but was that only in the earlier stage (i.e., seedling)?

Fumi
Fumi Nishida - Midland, Michigan (USDA Zone 5)

John Forrest

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2006, 10:59:00 AM »
Hi Fumi
I have had the same sort of experience with growing Kelseya uniflora as Franz. If the seeds arrive before the conditions ar right I store in plastic sandwich boxes with a sachet of drying agent (the sort you get with camera equipment) then put them in the fridge. This will enable you to sow some as before to get warm germination which you can harden off at the right season. Always a good idea to try different methods if you have sufficient seeds. I have sowed it in December and left out in the cold & wet and got only 1 or 2 from a batch but these survived well. But waiting for the flowers is a long job. Mine was about 10 years or more to reach about 10 cm before it flowered and then just a sprinkling. It needs pretty free draining compost to keep it tight and in character. Sadly mine got a rot at about 16-17cm and went to the great compost heap in the sky but it did have a last flourish of flowering. I just have a single 4cm specimen left and a long wait!!
Good luck with yours
John F
Blackpool Lancashire Northwest UK

hadacekf

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2006, 08:12:31 PM »
Hi Fumi,
I grow Kelseya uniflora outside like many other plants. Therefore is watering not necessary in winter. All seedlings are not to dry up.
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

Franz Hadacek's Alpines And Bulbs
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Fumi

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2006, 02:38:51 AM »
Hi John, Hi Franz
Thanks.  I guess I'll be really patient with this one.  Hopefully, I'll have enough germination and be able to test them to see what works.  If I'm lucky, I'll be back with some updates in a few months.
Fumi Nishida - Midland, Michigan (USDA Zone 5)

ranunculus

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2006, 08:00:24 PM »
All this talk of food Mrs Young.....

Perhaps you'd better admit to the forum that you are far more 'professional' in the kitchen than you are letting on....

You probably thought that 'alpine' growers wouldn't reach the sunnier hills of St Lucia and your secret would be safe........

...but, oh no......

Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Maggi Young

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Re: Kelseya uniflora
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2006, 08:13:35 PM »
Bother! My secret is out! Now everyone knows.... yes, I must tell you now, that as a little girl in Berlin I saw my first Maggi product ( it was a packet of Chicken Noodle soup, as I fondly recall, and passed as gourmet fare from our cook) and I decided then and there that since someone had been good enough to name a food company after me, that I would henceforth spell my name as Maggi rather than the more usual Maggie! So you see, Cliff, the company isn't mine, it merely exists in tribute to my eating abilities!
Tremble, Pudsey Piglets, tremble!!

Not that any of this has anything to do with Kelseya uniflora... except that we once managed to preside overthe prolonged decline and passing of a truly venerable plant left to us by the late, great Jack Crosland.... it was very old and very large, which is probably why it took a long time to give up life.... we did our best, it just wasn't good enough. Not one of our prouder memories... the plant must have been ten or twelve inches across a dome... it never flowered well in our care because we didn't turn it enough, I think, and when we eventually decided it HAD to be repotted, the poor thing had just had too much, bless it. We have never felt worse about losing a plant. Sorry, Jack!
« Last Edit: December 23, 2006, 08:20:09 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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