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Author Topic: Notes from Norway  (Read 30988 times)

Ian Y

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2015, 08:46:39 AM »
Great thread Trond, I look forward to following the progress as the snow gives way to spring and all that comes with it.

Stunning photographs, thanks for sharing.
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Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2015, 08:48:30 AM »
Vinterstandere. That is dry stems standing against the weather and dispersing its seeds during the winter.
The field gentian (Gentianella campestris), yarrow (Achemilla millefolium) and vanilla gras (Anthoxanthum odoratum) are some examples.






This is what the field gentian looks like in August. It is an annual flowering late in the season.

« Last Edit: April 02, 2015, 08:56:24 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2015, 08:58:48 AM »
Trond,

This is great! I look forward to following along as spring progresses.

I looks like it may not be far off.

Robert, you have to wait a while for the spring here!

Maybe the spring flowers open in late April, but we can have snow here till May, both on the ground and in the air.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2015, 09:00:54 AM »
Great thread Trond, I look forward to following the progress as the snow gives way to spring and all that comes with it.

Stunning photographs, thanks for sharing.

Thanks Ian ;D

As I told Robert it will take some time - and I will unfortunately not be here continually :-\
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Matt T

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2015, 09:10:07 AM »
Fascinating thread, Trond. We seem to share so many plants in common. It will be interesting to see what else the melting snow reveals. Will read your posts with interest.
Matt Topsfield
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Tim Ingram

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2015, 10:35:43 AM »
Trond - really look forward to seeing what happens when the snow melts! (or even while it is still there). We rarely get long lasting snow here - one of the reasons why the garden is full of snowdrops  ;). I have great memories of visiting Norway with friends many years ago and walking to one of those amazing 'farms' sitting on a ledge high above Geirangerfjord, plus a lot of apple blossom in places. I am very envious of those who have visited the Botanic Garden at Tromsö and also Svalbard - greatly enjoy seeing these wild places.
Dr. Timothy John Ingram. Nurseryman & gardener with strong interest in plants of Mediterranean-type climates and dryland alpines. Garden in Kent, UK. www.coptonash.plus.com

Robert

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2015, 03:31:14 PM »
Trond,

Does the current livestock grazing have an impact on the native flora? If so, are there locations where the plants are protected?

Is it possible for me to find out more about "huldra", the wood nymph. My wife writes scaldic poetry. I think that she would find it very interesting.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2015, 12:54:25 AM by Robert »
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Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2015, 07:09:04 AM »
Thanks Tim :)

Those farms high up are not in use as farms any more (now they are summer houses, tourist centres etc.) but the fruit growers along the fjords are very much alive and in May when all the trees are in flower are well worth a visit. I drive there several times a year, not at Geirangerfjorden but Hardangerfjorden/Sørfjorden.
I have unfortunately not had the opportunity to visit Tromsø Botanical Garden yet, but it is on my list!
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2015, 07:10:50 AM »
Thanks Matt,

Hopefully not all the snow has gone when I come up here next time!
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2015, 07:31:56 AM »
Robert,

The current livestock grazing is to little to affect the flora - in fact here and many other places the grazing is too little to keep away the tree seedlings so previous open landscapes are slowly, or rather fast many places, covered by forests. The flora of these places is the consequence of grazing and a lot of the plants benefit from it. Many plants are also brought into a landscape by man/livestock.

The species richest habitats here are almost all old cultivated land used many places in millennia and where the grass has been harvested by scythe when ripe and stored in small hoses in the field and brought home to the farm in winter. Now those meadows are almost all gone. Some places modern agriculture has taken over, other places the forest has!

Some areas are protected and also cultivated/grazed to keep the flora intact. It is still common some places to let especially the sheep and goats go out all summer and the right farmers have to do so is very old. But we also have the right that everyone can walk on all land (including private property outside the cities) except highly cultivated of course.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2015, 07:40:38 AM »
Although the sun shines from a blue sky with few clouds the air is very cold and it barely reaches 0C during the daytime. The thaw is slow.

Do you recognize these leaves? It is a tough but soft looking plant - Polemonium caereleum. The first new growth is barely visible.


   



Along the wall where the snow melts a little faster you can see the tracks of the commonest animal near the houses - field vole, Microtus agrestis. Farther away from the houses the droppings would probably belong to the lemming, Lemmus lemmus, seen here another year.


   
« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 07:50:59 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2015, 07:59:27 AM »
It is a lot of wildlife to see and hear but without a proper lens it is difficult to take pictures of anything but the droppings!
Here from a hare, they are everywhere but usually out only at night.





The ptarmigans are also common and we regularly frighten some away from their lunch. Sometimes they have to dig down to find their favorite food.






Also wood grouse Tetrao urogallus and black grouse Tetrao tetrix are common here, especially the last one which we hear every early morning when they are performing their courtship ritual.

These tracks may be from a wood grouse. They are too heavy!


   
« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 08:10:02 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2015, 08:15:01 AM »
The creeks and other watercourses are about to open. May be difficult to cross in a few weeks' time.





Out in the open landscape!


   
« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 08:18:48 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2015, 08:24:19 AM »
Arctostaphylos alpinus is common on the ridges. It flowers quite early but not yet.




The other pictures would't!
« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 08:36:18 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: Notes from Norway
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2015, 08:37:31 AM »
The crowberries are still there but not very good. I tasted some but they are better in fall. Maybe the birds like them?

 



A nice pine.


« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 08:40:55 AM by Hoy »
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

 


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