We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: A seed cleaning query  (Read 1145 times)

Roma

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2344
  • Country: scotland
A seed cleaning query
« on: September 26, 2014, 08:39:04 PM »
I have lots of seed of Hedysarum coronarium for the Seed Exchange.  The pods break up so each individual seed is enclosed in its own capsule.  Should the pod be removed which I think will be difficult or is it all right to send the seed as it is?
Roma Fiddes, near Aberdeen in north East Scotland.

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44011
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2014, 08:45:39 PM »
I'll pass the query to the Seedy Folks, Roma, but I think it  would be better if the seed were to be extracted.  For overseas sending all seed must be fully cleaned as far as I know.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Roma

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2344
  • Country: scotland
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2014, 09:20:02 PM »
Thanks, Maggi.
Roma Fiddes, near Aberdeen in north East Scotland.

Jupiter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1409
  • Country: au
  • Summers too hot, too dry and too long.
    • https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstonor/
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2014, 05:12:38 AM »
Roma I had the same trouble with this species when I was trying to clean some seed for myself. It's a pain in the bottom! I ended up picking them apart by hand one at a time into a tray while watching TV.

Nature must have a way of opening the pods, whether that's a cycle of wet and dry, hot and cold or just the pod rotting away I'm not sure... I have it in the garden this year and I noticed the first flowers opening just the other day.

« Last Edit: September 27, 2014, 05:14:40 AM by Jupiter »
Jamus Stonor, in the hills behind Adelaide, South Australia.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstonor/

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44011
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2014, 02:30:05 PM »
A speedy reply received from  Seed Packing Guru, Ian Pryde :

"Yes it is most desirable for a range of reasons that seeds are well cleaned. The demand for Hedysarum seeds is small so a modest donation will be welcomed by us and save the donor some postage."

 :)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

ChrisB

  • SRGC Subscription Secretary
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2370
  • Country: gb
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2014, 05:38:12 PM »
Yes, but now I've googled it I may just try some... Not a plant I know but it looks very nice. Pea family I'm guessing
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44011
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2014, 05:43:06 PM »
 ;D ;)  I bet you're not the only one, Christine  :D

Very helpful to have the direct google links in the seed-list to search for the things you haven't heard of too, isn't it? 
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Roma

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2344
  • Country: scotland
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2014, 08:31:12 PM »
Ok.  I'll clean a few if I have time.  It is very attractive, Chris but will get very big.  Yes it is pea family.  I sowed seeds last year and planted out three plants with some annuals.  They did not flower last year and not sure how hardy it is as last year was not a test for hardiness.  The netting wire was a rabbit deterrent.  The Hedysarum would sprawl without support.  The pictures were taken on June 12th and they must have been double the size before I cut them back last week. 
Roma Fiddes, near Aberdeen in north East Scotland.

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44011
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2014, 09:17:47 PM »
It's a very pretty colour, Roma.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Jupiter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1409
  • Country: au
  • Summers too hot, too dry and too long.
    • https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstonor/
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2014, 09:33:48 PM »

Mediterranean plant from dry, hot climates. I wouldn't even consider it in most of the uk, especially not Scotland! I'm trialing it this year but if it doesn't behave it's out.
Jamus Stonor, in the hills behind Adelaide, South Australia.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstonor/

ChrisB

  • SRGC Subscription Secretary
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2370
  • Country: gb
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2014, 01:59:50 PM »
Think it would take to my dry garden.  I can grow salvias here that a lot of other UK folks can't, but I sure do struggle with anything that likes wet.  We've had very little rain now for what seems ages...  Soil is bone dry even down a foot.
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

Lesley Cox

  • way down south !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16347
  • Country: nz
  • Gardening forever, house work.....whenever!
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2014, 09:08:27 PM »
I have sometimes used my otherwise under-utilised coffee grinder to clean seed such as the Hedysarum. The blades throw the seed around and remove most of the husks without damaging the seeds themselves. It's easy then, to clean the seed properly, blowing away the dusty stuff after shunting the bigger stuff off the edge of a flat plate. The grinder just needs a good dusting out with a small brush before going back to its proper purpose. :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Jupiter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1409
  • Country: au
  • Summers too hot, too dry and too long.
    • https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstonor/
Re: A seed cleaning query
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2014, 04:35:48 AM »

That's a good idea Lesley. I've used professional versions at work; big noisy things, threshers they call them, but never the coffee grinder. I reckon it would work a treat.
Jamus Stonor, in the hills behind Adelaide, South Australia.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstonor/

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal