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Author Topic: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California  (Read 16410 times)

Robert

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #135 on: December 19, 2014, 02:01:41 PM »
I have just planted W. fimbriata under the apples with many other ferns. No stream nearby but I hope it might show similar tolerance to drier summers. Species of dryopteris and polystichum all do very well and they add a great deal to the garden.

Around here Woodwardia fimbriata is a complete "water hog". I have never seen them growing away from a water source of some sort, even in the coastal fog belt. It will extremely interesting to learn how it does for you in your climatic situation and current planting site - irrigation program or non irrigation.

For us Dryopteris arguta and Polystichum minutum are tolerant of drier conditions and can still preform well.

Thanks for the brief report. It would be interesting to know if you are growing any of our other California Polystichum species. Most are from a higher elevation in the Sierra Nevada. No photograph of them until the snow melts this coming summer.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
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If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #136 on: December 19, 2014, 02:16:50 PM »
I  imagine that I am following in your steps, Robert, seeing what you see!

Interesting details, what lacks is the smells and sounds that always are accompanying you at a walk like that!

Trond,

I was able to recover a few spores off of Dryopteris arguta. I planted them already. I may be able to recover more - hopefully it is not too late.

For me it will be interesting growing our native ferns on from spores. Many of them divide out easily, some of the others sprout and grow without any effort on my part, but most do not. The spores ripen and dehisce at different seasons for the various species. I have a feeling, for some, it may be tricky to get the spores to sprout and grow on.

PM me if you are interested in more details.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Tim Ingram

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #137 on: December 19, 2014, 03:44:40 PM »
Robert, unlike your conditions in California with such severe drought earlier on we have had the most rainfall we've ever recorded this year - getting on for 42" compared with our long term average of 27". The ferns have never looked so good and many of the woodland plants have stayed in growth much longer than normal. We do grow Polystichum munitum but it seems less tolerant of dry conditions than many other species - I should probably move it to a better spot. I remember seeing a magnificent plant of it in an Irish garden, which stood out because it's such a distinctive species. Don't grow any other Californians but I will check the BPS (British Pteridological Society) spore list after Christmas.
Dr. Timothy John Ingram. Nurseryman & gardener with strong interest in plants of Mediterranean-type climates and dryland alpines. Garden in Kent, UK. www.coptonash.plus.com

Hoy

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #138 on: December 21, 2014, 07:24:48 AM »
Around here Woodwardia fimbriata is a complete "water hog". I have never seen them growing away from a water source of some sort, even in the coastal fog belt. It will extremely interesting to learn how it does for you in your climatic situation and current planting site - irrigation program or non irrigation.
. . . . .. . .

Glad to know! I do plant different kinds of ferns around in the garden and it is useful to know of their habitat. Although it usually is moist here the summers can be rather dry (but not like a Californian drought though!).
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Robert

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #139 on: January 01, 2015, 01:34:13 AM »
31 December 2014

Weather: Mostly clear, some high clouds.

Temperature High:52F (11c)  Low:22F (-5.5C)

Back at the farm now after a little time away.

Today was a good day to scout out American Canyon Creek, a 3 mile hike down the canyon to the Middle Fork of the American River.



The trail starts at the top of the ridge at 1,750 feet (685 meters) and works its way down the east facing canyon side. This slope was covered with mature Douglas Fir (Pseuditsuga menziesii) and Canyon Live Oak (Quercus chrysolepis) as the dominant canopy trees, with an understory of Bay (Umbellularia californica), Madrone (Arbutus menziesii), and Philadelphus lewisii.



In this habitat ferns are everywhere. The slopes are covered in Dryoptris arguta (pictured), as well as Pentagramma triangularis, Adiantum jordanii, and Polypodium calirhiza this species mostly growing out of cliff faces.



Where there is year round running water, Giant Chain Ferns (Woodwardia fimbriata) are often found. It is hard to tell, but this one was huge standing nearly 2 meters tall!



I took a wrong turn and ended up on an upper trail over looking the canyon. This turned out okay, as my main mission was to scout habitat for Erythroniums. Conditions looked good. I will be returning a bit later in the season to see if I find any coming up.



Back tracking to the correct trail, I finally arrived at the bottom of the canyon and crossed American Canyon Creek and different habitat on the west facing slope.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #140 on: January 01, 2015, 02:07:47 AM »


I found this waterfall down a steep icy slope. Good place the take a swim during the heat of the summer.



The cliff face on the other opposite bank was covered with icicles. I was in the shade most of the day where it never thawed out. This caused problems with my camera as it did not want to function in the relative cold. Bummer  :P as there were some new plants that I wanted to photograph.



Near the Middle Fork of the American River there were these beautiful frozen rock gardens of Sedum spathulifolium, Heuchera micrantha, Polypodium calirhiza and a few other plants.



Bracken Ferns, Pteridium aquilinum var. pubescens, very dormant, and growing at a somewhat low elevation for this species.



Finally I arrived at the Middle Fork. 685 feet (209 meters). The trail crosses the River here at Poverty Bar, the water too high for a crossing today so it was time to turn back. I did find a few new plants on this outing that I will want to investigate this coming spring. I found an interesting Ribes species, most likely R. roezlii, a common species a little higher up the mountain, however it could also be R. amarum, a species I have never found. They key out close together so I will just have to come back later.  ;)

Symphoricarpus mollis was common on this outing, and I did find a few Rubus leucodermis. The camera did not want to cooperate with this one - the blue stems with a white bloom are striking on this species. I finally found some Styrax - they can be abundant when one finds the correct habitat. The flowers are very fragrant. Very drought tolerant like Philadelphus lewisii and excellent in our garden too.

Another good outing and with many new things to check out this coming new year.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Hoy

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #141 on: January 01, 2015, 08:30:16 AM »
I am a bit jealous, Robert!
 
Although I really like skiing it isn't much green to see while being out at this time of the year, at least not up here. The days are very short also so even at home where we usually have no snow you don't reach much. The flora isn't that rich either - you'll find pretty much the same from sea level and up in the mountains.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Robert

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Re: Robert's adventures in the Northern Sierra Nevada - California
« Reply #142 on: January 01, 2015, 03:15:23 PM »
Trond,

The flora here in California is amazing. Here in the coldest part of our winter, I can still go out and identify 45 or so different species all in the same life zone. In the spring it will be in the 100's. Each life zone also has its subtleties. Even though I'm working the same general life zone right now, I generally find 5-10 plants that I didn't see on a previous outing.

It is unfortunate that my camera had such difficulties on my last outing, there were some beautiful sites on some of the frozen cliff and rock faces. If I hold my hand around the battery end of the camera it will work, but then I often need both hands to stay safe, especially when it is icy. I'm sure that the new cameras are much better than my old camera in this regard. Some feed back on cameras in cold weather would be helpful to me. At some point I will need to buy a new one, one that will work when it is cold. Has anyone been on Everest with a digital camera that still works?

The high Sierra Nevada are covered with snow now (a good thing!), so there is not much to see there plant wise. I will most likely take a few trips up there this winter as I like their winter beauty too.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

 


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