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Author Topic: LEWISIA-2014  (Read 5098 times)

Maggi Young

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Re: LEWISIA-2014
« Reply #45 on: June 23, 2014, 08:28:49 PM »
Roma, the AGS seed was collected in Idaho by Gordon and Kath Fowler, so I'd be pretty sure that the SRGC initial "J" is just a typo and it is the same donation. 
Yes, a typo  for "G"

Good seed , wasn't it?  8)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Thorkild Godsk

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Re: LEWISIA-2014
« Reply #46 on: June 23, 2014, 08:58:08 PM »
Lewisia Rediviva sown in 2006, it is first year it is in flower.
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Maggi Young

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Re: LEWISIA-2014
« Reply #47 on: June 23, 2014, 09:07:34 PM »
Lewisia brachycalyx  can be a cracking flower  but L. rediviva must be the "queen"  8)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Robert

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Re: LEWISIA-2014
« Reply #48 on: June 24, 2014, 01:24:59 AM »
The Lewisia rediviva plants seem so robust! And from wild seed.

In their natural habitat they grow in the most difficult situations. It is extremely hot during the summer, 40c daytime temperatures are common. It is also extremely dry with little or no rain from June to Mid-October. They grow in basically little or no soil, many times growing in the tiniest of cracks in the rock, which is often serpentine.

If the story is true, Lewisia rediviva was collected on the Lewis and Clark expedition. After who knows how long, a dried-up, dead-looking root arrived in the eastern U.S. It somehow started into growth and thus was named rediviva, as it seemingly came back to life.

Could Lewisia rediviva be short lived if the growing conditions are too lush? Too much moisture or too much plant food of any type, the growing conditions are too easy. Around here, this is the easiest way too kill them in cultivation. They seem to thrive on seemingly neglect, but they also grow like the wild plants being, in general, tiny plants with smallish flowers, maybe 1 to 3 per plant.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
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David Nicholson

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Re: LEWISIA-2014
« Reply #49 on: June 24, 2014, 06:01:21 PM »

If the story is true, Lewisia rediviva was collected on the Lewis and Clark expedition. After who knows how long, a dried-up, dead-looking root arrived in the eastern U.S. It somehow started into growth and thus was named rediviva, as it seemingly came back to life.

On the first of July 1806 on Lewis and Clark's return journey at or near the junction of the Bitterroot River and Lolo Creek about 19km south of Missoula in Montana. In 1871 a chap called Edward Palmer wrote a report for the U.S. Department of Agriculture on L. rediviva's potential as a cultivated food crop. Native Americans used the root of L. rediviva as a source of starch and I've read some still do. In March 1827 the Scottish collector, David Douglas collected specimens from the upper Columbia River tributeries and sent them to the RHS in England where they failed to grow. The first flowering in England was in 1863 at Kew from material collected by David Lyall from southcentral British Columbia.
Sources: Brian Mathew, 'The Genus Lewisia' 1989 and  B. LeRoy Davidson, 'Lewisias' 2000.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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