Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Alpines => Topic started by: Leucogenes on March 17, 2017, 09:11:28 PM

Title: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 17, 2017, 09:11:28 PM
In addition to my obsession for the alpine flora of New Zealand, I am thrilled by spectacular plants of the Patagonian Andes.
These are often still archaic but very difficult in keeping and cultivating. I already had some very rare species, but often not very long. I will soon build an area with better conditions. In the hope that there are some specialists for these plants, I therefore open this new topic. I hope I get some tips on the attitude here.

I was inspired to this topic today, because today I could get very nice South Americans with my friend Gerd Stopp. Most are not on his list.

I'll start with today's highlight ...

Viola dasyphylla

Best regards
Thomas

... as always ... sorry for my english
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Hoy on March 17, 2017, 10:24:48 PM
Hi Thomas

I really hope you are able to grow the Viola dasyphylla!

Here is a plant from Patagonia:


[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 18, 2017, 08:58:55 AM
A great shot. You probably already had the pleasure to be there? Then you can show more pictures. You do not get so often to see what.

I guess the joy of this little diva will not last long. It is probably very difficult in the attitude. There are for example some Nassauvia species with me somewhat more durable ... until now.  ;) Do you also cultivate some South Americans?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 18, 2017, 01:40:52 PM
.... because I currently have nothing blooming from Patagonia, I show here something special from the last year. On one of my many visits to Gerd Stopp, I was lucky enough to photograph a blossoming Leucheria hahnii. She is one of the best South Americans for me. Unfortunately he has lost all of them. I got two copies of him. One still lives. :)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on March 18, 2017, 07:37:24 PM
Viola dasyphylla is a real gem and I hope you succeed with it. In the wild it forms tight mats or low cushions. I have grown this several times and flowered it once. It tends to etiolate in cultivation and needs high light. I think it might be worth trying additional lighting to keep them in character, though I have yet to try this. I have some V. dasyphylla germinating at the moment from seed sown in 2008 - I have had a few seedling every year from the same pot since 2009.
In the wild this species shows some variation in flower shape, size and body colour - usually white occasionally creamy yellow. At the north of their range rosettes become progressively tinier making the flowers appear relatively large.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on March 18, 2017, 07:48:15 PM
Thomas- if I may introduce Martin Sheader to you - he and his wife Anna-Liisa  have travelled extensively in South America - also leading tours there - and is the author of 'Flowers of the Patagonian Mountains' (http://www.alpinegardensociety.net/sales/books/flora/Flowers+of+the+Patagonian+Mountans/307/)  - he  is also one of the most successful growers in the UK of these plants.  :)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Hoy on March 18, 2017, 09:14:58 PM
A great shot. You probably already had the pleasure to be there? Then you can show more pictures. You do not get so often to see what.

I guess the joy of this little diva will not last long. It is probably very difficult in the attitude. There are for example some Nassauvia species with me somewhat more durable ... until now.  ;) Do you also cultivate some South Americans?

Thomas, I have been in Patagonia once and I had the pleasure of meeting the Sheaders in Argentina. They probably don't remember me but I remember them! I have the book which Maggi mentions and it has been very useful to me.

I do not grow many plants from South America as they dislike the coastal climate here. I prefer to grow plants in the garden and not in a glass house.


Here is a nice Nassauvia revoluta (I think) from Neuquen, Argentina.

[attachimg=1]


....and an unknown Leucheria(?)

[attachimg=2]


Does anybody grow Oreopolus glacialis?

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Michael J Campbell on March 18, 2017, 09:54:20 PM
Junellia coralloides
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Michael J Campbell on March 18, 2017, 10:00:48 PM
Benthamiella patagonica.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on March 18, 2017, 11:19:10 PM
Michael, we described your junellia a couple of years ago - it is now Junellia coralloides. It seems to be doing quite well in cultivation and has appeared at shows in the south of England. In the wild the the coral like growth can seem almost dead at flowering (see images below).
The Leucheria pictures is Leucheria candidissima.
Oreopolus glacialis is a plant that should be growable. It is found in a range of habitats, from steppe to mountain slopes and exposed ridges. There are a few people trying to grow this species in the UK at the moment. Germination of seed is good if fresh seed is used, and germination occurs in spring following an autumn sowing. Growth is slow and again, good light is needed. We have flowered it once - poorly.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Hoy on March 19, 2017, 11:47:58 AM
.....

The Leucheria pictures is Leucheria candidissima.
Oreopolus glacialis is a plant that should be growable. It is found in a range of habitats, from steppe to mountain slopes and exposed ridges. There are a few people trying to grow this species in the UK at the moment. Germination of seed is good if fresh seed is used, and germination occurs in spring following an autumn sowing. Growth is slow and again, good light is needed. We have flowered it once - poorly.

Thanks. I wondered whether it could be a L candidissima but wasn't sure.
I also noticed Oreopolus from several different location and that's why I thought it might be growable even here.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 19, 2017, 09:11:02 PM
Thomas- if I may introduce Martin Sheader to you - he and his wife Anna-Liisa  have travelled extensively in South America - also leading tours there - and is the author of 'Flowers of the Patagonian Mountains' (http://www.alpinegardensociety.net/sales/books/flora/Flowers+of+the+Patagonian+Mountans/307/)  - he  is also one of the most successful growers in the UK of these plants.  :)

Maggi ... thank you for the information about Mr. Sheader. I am very pleased that I receive advice on this topic from such a well-known specialist.
I have countless questions.

Also best thanks for the reference to this book. I will try to buy it as soon as possible.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 19, 2017, 09:28:24 PM
I am very happy about the resonance on this topic. The photos shown are all indescribably beautiful.

As already said ... I have already lost some "South American" and would like to devote myself intensively to these jewels in the future.

At first, I would be happy about the confirmation or correction of different specimens that are still alive.

Draba antactica from Mt.Leon
Azorella madreporica from La Hoya,Esquel
Azorella ameghinoi
Xerodraba pectinata
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 19, 2017, 09:35:46 PM
...dann habe ich noch Nassauvia revoluta.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 19, 2017, 10:00:06 PM
Very resistant is with me Nassauvia pygmaea and Nassauvia juniperifolia .
If someone noticed a mistake ... I am very grateful for every correction.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 21, 2017, 09:53:30 PM
For this Azorella, my friends from the Arctic Alpine Garden and I need an ID. It comes from the area of ​​Las Lenas in the province of Mendoza. It has a light growth (not compact), but very long leaves. Should any of the specialists identify them it would be very good.

Thanks Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 25, 2017, 06:22:12 PM
... I have found some pictures from last year. Unfortunately, most of these plants are already dead.  :'(

    Senecio cryptocephalus
    Nassaauvia lagascens 23.4.16
    Oxalis enneaphylla 2015
    Calceolaria fothergillii 1
    Alstroemeria patagonica 05.06.16
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 02, 2017, 07:39:57 PM
Here times two pictures of plants, which have not yet bloomed, but are nevertheless very nice for me.

Maihuenia poeppigii (left) and Maihuenia patagonica (right)
Nothofagus antarctica
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Hoy on April 03, 2017, 09:06:42 PM
I had several seedlings of Maihuenia but many were destroyed by slugs and the others died one wet winter.

Here are two pictures from Neuquen, Argentina:

Maihuenia poeppigii ( I suppose)

[attachimg=1]



..and Maihuenia patagonica (I hope)

[attachimg=2]



Leucogenes, you know that Nothofagus becomes a big tree?

Nothofagus forest

[attachimg=3]


Near the treeline

[attachimg=4]


View

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 03, 2017, 09:51:47 PM
Hello Trond ... yes, I know this kind is normally very large. This clone is from my friends from the Arctic Alpine Garden in Chemnitz. There the mother plant is at most 3 meters high and grows more like a shrub ... and it grows very slowly. :)

My two Maihuenia are outdoors, but they are covered with glass for safety. They grow very well but unfortunately without flowers.

Your pictures are fantastic. Until now, Leucheropia leontopodioides was my favorite. Now it is the Leucheria candidissima shown by you.

I look forward to more photos of your trip ... I ordered the book from Martin Sheader yesterday. ;D
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 06, 2017, 08:01:41 PM
... after successful germination it was now time to replant the young plants of Tropaeolum incissum. Hopefully, they continue to develop so well. :)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 06, 2017, 08:17:34 PM
A question to the specialists here ... is it worth to plant Cistanthe grandiflora in the Alpinum? Or do I have a field in a short time? The germination is very good. They are wild seeds from Chile. Unfortunately, no further details.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 08, 2017, 08:29:38 PM
Came today with the mail ... my new Bible. Fantastic. :)
Thanks again for the note, Maggi.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on April 08, 2017, 08:35:08 PM
Happy to help! Martin and AnnaLiisa  Sheader have a very extensive knowledge of the area. 
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Hoy on April 09, 2017, 07:52:48 AM
Leucogenes,

I can't advice you on the Cistanthe but you seem to have a lot of seedlings to try!

... after successful germination it was now time to replant the young plants of Tropaeolum incissum. Hopefully, they continue to develop so well. :)


The Tropaeolum looks great!

Here are a few pictures. We even found plants very high up in the mountains.

[attachimg=1]


At lower elevation they were in full flower:

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]


Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 09, 2017, 08:18:09 PM
Trond, thank you for the beautiful pictures. My garden is located on 400 m N.N.
Many times Trppaeolum incissum blooms with me ... in a hundred years.  ;)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 13, 2017, 05:11:10 PM
Recently purchased at Gerd Stopp ... Draba antarctica from Mt.Leon
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 18, 2017, 08:02:14 PM
Benthamiella patagonica yesterday ... every beginning is hard ... I am happy. ;D ;D
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 02, 2017, 08:01:57 PM
Today I was once again with Gerd Stopp and have taken a photo of two nice south countries for you.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 07, 2017, 09:06:29 PM
Calceolaria darwinii from today...
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: suesimpson33 on May 14, 2017, 12:37:13 AM
Junellia coralloides doing quite well for me!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: suesimpson33 on May 14, 2017, 12:41:06 AM
Benthamiella patagonica
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 14, 2017, 08:02:59 AM
Insanity. Both plants are fantastically nice. If you have pulled them from seed... or where one agrees such a thing here.?Nice you are present here. Thanks for the contribution.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on May 14, 2017, 11:32:02 AM
Both the Junellia and the Benthamiella  pictured by Sue were shown by her at the recent Glasgow show - where the Junellia won the Forrest Medal for the best plant in the show.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 16, 2017, 07:15:34 PM
This Junellia deserved to win a medal...Maggi.  A dream.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 16, 2017, 07:16:48 PM
From the Falkland Islands ... Olsynium filifolium
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 20, 2017, 08:40:27 PM
Antennaria chilensis
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 24, 2017, 08:37:34 PM
I was not aware of this thread. So let me post some pictures of last year in the beginning.


the seeds were gathered by me in Patagonia in 2013 and i was able to rise one single plant from seed to a flowering plant at home: Ourisia microphylla.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 24, 2017, 08:42:09 PM
A hostile plant, the slightest touch hurts you much. But a curious and beautiful flower. Not so compact as you may see it high in the mountains of the Andes. Raised from seeds bought at Chileflora.

Caiophora coronata.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 24, 2017, 08:44:58 PM
A Junellia, the most common in Argentina i think and far from the beauty, what we see above (Junellia coralloides)

Junellia patagonica
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 24, 2017, 09:07:53 PM
Gerrit ... welcome again here. I am very pleased. Great pictures.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 25, 2017, 09:41:03 AM
Now plants and flowers growing this year.

Cistanthe sp. Collection number 1173 from the Chileflora catalogue.
The flower opens for a couple of hours and after that it is finished.

I have heard that this phenomenon occurs with the southern species, like some calandrinias. The reason should be the absence of flying insects, due to the very strong winds. Is there anybody who might confirm this? Mr. Sheader perhaps?

Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 25, 2017, 09:52:32 AM
Thomas, how is you little precious doing? Viola dasyphylla?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on May 25, 2017, 03:00:39 PM
Gerrit,
Nice to see a few South Americans in flower.
Your Junellia is J. micrantha. It occurs throughout most of Patagonia and prefers to grow in areas where the soil is wet in spring, drying out later in the year. It forms a flat mat, sometimes flowering around the edge of the mat, others with flowers over the whole mat. We need some of these well-flowered clones in cultivation. Flowers can be white, pink, or lavender in colour, usually with a dark spot at the base of the petals. For us, this grows vigorously both in pots and in raised beds outside. The prostrate stems root readily as they extend.
Despite the wind, insects are plentiful in the Patagonian mountains and steppe, including butterfies, moths, flies, bees and beetle and most of the colourful flowers are insect pollinated.
The Cistanthe is not from Patagonia, but from the drier more northern areas of Chile. Many calandinias have short-lived flowers but some open each flower daily over several days. Once pollinated, flowers go over quickly.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 25, 2017, 03:34:36 PM
Thomas, how is you little precious doing? Viola dasyphylla?

Gerrit ... Viola dasyphylla lives amazingly still. Maybe because I got the good advice from Martin ... she needs a lot of light. I took three photos quickly ... I do not know how long I can still look forward to it. It has grown even a bit ... there are still miracles.  ;D ;D
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 25, 2017, 03:42:09 PM
... and here also the future corpse of Viola cotyledon.  ;D

  Both plants I got from my plant friend Gerd Stopp. A gift. But since it is only one specimen, I will never receive seeds. Very sad ... but I still enjoy it again and again.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 25, 2017, 03:47:38 PM
Yesterday discovered in the cold box ... Nassauvia dusenii in bloom. I'm going crazy. ;D
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 25, 2017, 05:55:52 PM
Despite the wind, insects are plentiful in the Patagonian mountains and steppe, including butterfies, moths, flies, bees and beetle and most of the colourful flowers are insect pollinated.
The Cistanthe is not from Patagonia, but from the drier more northern areas of Chile. Many calandinias have short-lived flowers but some open each flower daily over several days. Once pollinated, flowers go over quickly.

Thank you very much Martin. Now the "mystery" is solved.
During my visit in 2013, we discussed in the group the fact we saw so few insects. Perhaps we have looked too much down instead of around us. And we have seen so many ants on flowers like the rosulate violas, obviously pollinating them during their visits.

Gerrit,
Nice to see a few South Americans in flower.
Your Junellia is J. micrantha. It occurs throughout most of Patagonia and prefers to grow in areas where the soil is wet in spring, drying out later in the year. It forms a flat mat, sometimes flowering around the edge of the mat, others with flowers over the whole mat. We need some of these well-flowered clones in cultivation. Flowers can be white, pink, or lavender in colour, usually with a dark spot at the base of the petals. For us, this grows vigorously both in pots and in raised beds outside. The prostrate stems root readily as they extend.


Thanks again. This clone is a badly flowering one. Some of the stems has been rooted rather easily indeed, where they touched the soil.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 25, 2017, 06:03:54 PM
Gerrit ... Viola dasyphylla lives amazingly still. Maybe because I got the good advice from Martin ... she needs a lot of light. I took three photos quickly ... I do not know how long I can still look forward to it. It has grown even a bit ... there are still miracles.  ;D ;D

The season is still young. Who knows, perhaps your little plant gets more fat on his body instead of getting taller.
Do you allow the rain falling on his head?
A real miracle would be: flowers.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 27, 2017, 07:34:24 AM
The season is still young. Who knows, perhaps your little plant gets more fat on his body instead of getting taller.
Do you allow the rain falling on his head?
A real miracle would be: flowers.


Gerrit ... I am surprised and grateful that this viola still lives. To dream of blossoms would be measured. 😊

She is standing under a cover of glass in the sun. She gets only little water ... rarely.

I have unfortunately no experience with this species. Maybe Martin can tell you something more ... substrate, water, location ... I would be grateful.

Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 29, 2017, 11:35:33 AM
Montiopsis sericea, raised from seed. The first flower. Let's see how it will grow.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 29, 2017, 11:40:52 AM

Gerrit ... I am surprised and grateful that this viola still lives. To dream of blossoms would be measured. 😊

She is standing under a cover of glass in the sun. She gets only little water ... rarely.

I have unfortunately no experience with this species. Maybe Martin can tell you something more ... substrate, water, location ... I would be grateful.

Thomas

Perhaps it should be better not under glass. Glass prevents UV if i'm right. Under an open sky, faced south, but away from any precipitation. That's my suggestion.

Rosulate violas have leathery leaves which are arranged like tiles on a roof. Maybe rain does not harm them to much. Perhaps you may cover the soil in order to keep the substrate rather dry. Rosulate violas also have taproots, to give them stability on the moving screes and find melting water streaming underneath the surface. So maybe give them a deep pot. and give them water from beneath. The most vulnerable spot is where the root begins just under the rosette. Give them enough water and do not let the soil drying out completely. In their natural habitat it seems they grow in dry soil. Mostly vulcanic sand. There are 2 types: The volcanica-group, growing in the vast steppe. and the andina group, growing in the most hostile envronment in the high mountains. I was estonished, the forst time i saw them. "How can they suvive?" But after digging a small hole in the sand, i understood. There is permanent water, also in the steppe.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: shelagh on May 29, 2017, 02:06:20 PM
Thomas what a lovely fern Polystichum andinum and so very like P. lemmonii which we grow and which comes from N. America.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 29, 2017, 09:37:15 PM
Perhaps it should be better not under glass. Glass prevents UV if i'm right. Under an open sky, faced south, but away from any precipitation. That's my suggestion.

Rosulate violas have leathery leaves which are arranged like tiles on a roof. Maybe rain does not harm them to much. Perhaps you may cover the soil in order to keep the substrate rather dry. Rosulate violas also have taproots, to give them stability on the moving screes and find melting water streaming underneath the surface. So maybe give them a deep pot. and give them water from beneath. The most vulnerable spot is where the root begins just under the rosette. Give them enough water and do not let the soil drying out completely. In their natural habitat it seems they grow in dry soil. Mostly vulcanic sand. There are 2 types: The volcanica-group, growing in the vast steppe. and the andina group, growing in the most hostil envronment in the high mountains. I was estonished, the forst time i saw them. "How can they suvive?" But after digging a small hole in the sand, i understood. There is permanent water, also in the steppe.






Gerrit ... thank you for the information. I have now poured the pots into large pots and filled them with sand. And then water. Let's see how they develop.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 29, 2017, 09:41:01 PM
... a very beautiful Fern, Shelagh.  Thank you for showing.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 30, 2017, 07:55:28 AM
Montiopsis sericea a day later.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on May 30, 2017, 08:06:21 AM
Raised from Chileflora seed this Calceolaria sp. I am not 100% sure, but i think it is Calceolaria pallida.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 01, 2017, 04:59:30 PM
Perezia linearis provides each year only few flowers.

Not Perezia linearis, but Perezia recurvata (probably subsp recurvata.) With many thanks to Martin Sheader.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 01, 2017, 05:06:27 PM
I already posted this perezia in another thread.

Now I have found the name (maybe???) Perezia pedicularidfolia.

Is there anybody who may confirm this?

Not Perezia pedicularidfolia but Leucheria lithospermifolia. Determination by Martin Sheader. Thanks a lot Martin!


[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on June 01, 2017, 07:02:51 PM
Hi Gerrit,
The perezias can be very confusing. Flower colour is quite variable.
Your Perezia linearis seems to be one of the many forms of P. recurvata  probably ssp. recurvata. The leaves of P. linearis are smoother with a margin of very fine hairs.
Your P. pedicularidifolia is Leucheria lithospermifolia. Perezia flowers are usually blue or white and have projecting styles. The calyx of P. pedicularidifolia is quite diffrent - see image below.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 01, 2017, 08:53:37 PM
I am very greatful, Martin, you have the wright names. Thank you very much. I'll change it above.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 05, 2017, 08:45:03 PM
Hello Gerrit,

Again you show wonderful plants. Now you have, nevertheless, a Leucheria in your collection ;D ;D... my congratulation. Hopefully you can receive them long... she is great. Another two plants of the week-end...

Calceolaria laceolaria and Hypsela reniformis.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 06, 2017, 11:35:49 AM
The seeds were wrongly labelled as Perezia. Now it seems to be Leucheria. Not bad hé.

A peculiar and beautiful Calceolaria.

Never heard of Hypsela reniformis and I like it. It grows in South-America indeed.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on June 06, 2017, 01:09:38 PM
Hypsela reniformis has now been renamed as Lobelia oligophylla which is now the accepted name. Its flowers vary in colour from white to pink with darker markings and it always grows in wet boggy conditions. It may be best with the pot standing in a saucer of water, since if it dries out you will probably lose it. It's in the campanula family.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 06, 2017, 01:34:17 PM
Thanks for the new name... Martin. With me it stands the whole year in the Alpinum and it grows very well.

Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 06, 2017, 04:15:08 PM
I have 2 seedlings of Viola cotyledon. Now I must put them in a definitive pot. But in which soil? Is there anybody, who can give me advice?
Thomas in which soil your violas grow?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 06, 2017, 06:48:29 PM
unfortunately, from cannot grow the speech be... They have dead  :'(  But Martin as a specialist can help certainly... I could not give the optimum conditions to these divas... But I do not surrender.  :)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 08, 2017, 06:52:17 PM
The first flowers on Calceolaria arachnoidea.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 09, 2017, 06:46:25 PM
Viola polypoda, Endemic to Chile, growing in very dry soil at sea level. First flower, hopefully the plant will grow somewhat. It is so tiny.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on June 09, 2017, 08:34:33 PM
Viola polypoda, Endemic to Chile, growing in very dry soil at sea level. First flower, hopefully the plant will grow somewhat. It is so tiny.
Oh my, that's lovely. I don't think we've ever seen that in the forum before!

 Just this question about germinating the seed.... way back in 2009......  http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=3092.0 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=3092.0)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 15, 2017, 07:08:23 PM
Calandrinia-time.

1. Calandrinia umbellata, garden
2. Calandrinia umbellata, Epulauquen, Argentina, December 2013
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 15, 2017, 09:19:44 PM
Gerrit... nice pictures, as usual. Today I can also show sometimes what. ;)

Oxalis "Tina"
Nassauvia gaudichaudii
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 16, 2017, 08:12:23 AM
Nassauvia gaudichaudii

Very special indeed. How old is this plant? And how do you treat him?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 18, 2017, 09:15:59 PM
Today the first flower on Calandrinia ranunculina, a species from southern Patagonia. This species provides mostly a single flower a day. So, it is not very showy.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on June 20, 2017, 08:50:47 PM
We have a rosulate viola flowering at the moment. Viola subandina is an extremely variable annual or (very) short-lived perennial. Flowers can be white, pink, lavender or blue and quite variable in size. These have minute flowers (even for V. subandina) - 4mm across! These soft-leaved andinium violas flower for quite a few weeks, with new flowers opening each morning, fading by mid-afternoon.
The last time we grew this species every plant was cleistogamous, failing to open its flowers, but producing lots of seed. Some populations in the wild are thought reproduce mainly through cleistogamy.



Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on June 20, 2017, 08:52:21 PM
Well done on getting flowers, Martin.  Rather charming little things, for sure.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 20, 2017, 09:22:41 PM
A rosulate viola in culture and in flower, what an achievement. Seeds harvested by yourself I presume.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 21, 2017, 05:03:46 PM
A new species raised from Chileflora seed, Montiopsis sp 2147. At first sight it looks like Calandrinia umbellata,, but this new plantis as twice as big as C. umbellata. The genera Calandrinia, Montiopsis and Cistanthe are very similar, but regarded as separated species.

1. Flowerhead of Montiopsis sp 2147
2, Compare the two species.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on June 26, 2017, 02:22:59 PM
A few plants in flower at the moment.
Mutisia decurrens we planted about four years ago. This climbing daisy grows at woodland margins and mountain slopes. It flowered for the first time last year planted in a sandy raised bed. The brilliant orange large flowers close at night.
In the same bed we have Oenothera acaulis with large white flowers, night flowering, each flower fading to pink the following day. This has seeded around for us.
Lomatia ferruginea is a large shrub in the Proteaceae with unusual flowers. If dry at the roots in spring or early summer, it may fail to flower, but this year it has done well. Annoyingly, we haven't succeeded with its relative Embothrium coccineum!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on June 26, 2017, 02:38:59 PM
Also in flower in the greenhouse are a number of alstroemerias. A. versicolor is from central Chile (northern Patagonia) and has intricately marked upright-facing flowers. At altitude it may grow as a dwarf, with sometimes a single flower per stem, but at lower altitude it can be taller  - about 30cm.

Moving north out of Patagonia, growing in the same sand bed as the oenothera is Hypseocharis pimpinellifolia. This one time member of the Geraniacea is now in the Oxalidaceae. We have a couple of plants which die down in autumn, reappearing in June. The bright red flowers are produced throughout the summer, each flower lasting a single day. Our plants have survived outside for many years.

One final shrub from Northern Argentina is Iochroma australe. This brugsmansia relative forms a large deciduous shrub producing many flowers throughout the summer. For us it needs regular pruning, and anything growing beneath it is buried in a blue mat of old flowers - but it's worth it for the spectacle!. 
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on June 26, 2017, 04:32:04 PM
What a glorious plant, the Mutisia decurrens. Unfortunately i did not see it in real, The species, M. retorsa an M. spinosa, i did see in Argentina.
A splendid photo Martin.

So they are related, the very red Embotrium and this Lomatia whith remarkable flowers.

Also a beautiful and stunning Iochroma. What a colour.

Thanks for sharing these amazing plants, Martin.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on June 26, 2017, 05:22:29 PM
Friends living  not far from us in Aberdeenshire grew  Mutisia decurrens for many years - the bright flowers delighting all who saw them. We never managed to establish it properly here in Aberdeen - even though the pink hybrid  M. oligodon  grows  very well for us.

 I agree with Gerrit - the Iochroma is  a smasher!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Steve Garvie on June 27, 2017, 12:16:44 PM
Wow!!!
Superb plants Martin!

The Mutisia decurrens and Iochroma are particularly appealing.
Are there any commercial sources for these plants in the UK?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ashley on June 27, 2017, 01:30:09 PM
Acnistus australis (syn. Iochroma australe) is available from Chiltern Seeds in both blue (https://www.chilternseeds.co.uk/item_39Q_acnistus_australis_blue) & white (https://www.chilternseeds.co.uk/item_39R_acnistus_australis_white) forms, & germinates easily.  A gorgeous thing.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on June 27, 2017, 02:33:24 PM
I'm not sure where we got our Iochroma. Burncoose Nurseries sell it, and one of the nurseries at this years AGS Kent Show had it under its old name Acnistus australis. At the same show, small plants of Mutisia decurrens were for sale on the members sales table!
I will try to pollinate and collect seed from my M. decurrens; some species of mutisia are self fertile.
The RHS describe Iochroma as half hardy, but it has certainly survived quite a few frosts with us down to about -9C so far, but we do live on the south coast in UK's banana belt!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Steve Garvie on June 27, 2017, 03:08:50 PM
Thanks Martin.
I had thought of growing the Iochroma in a large pot and moving it under glass in the winter but it looks to be too big a shrub to allow this.
If you ever have seed of M. decurrens available for swap please keep me in mind.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Carolyn on June 27, 2017, 04:05:55 PM
Steve,
Might be OK to rrisk the lochroma outside. A friend of mine has a large one growing beside a south facing wall near Dumfries, about half a mile from the coast. It has survived there for several years so far and is a mass of flowers just now. I got seeds from her last winter and am growing on 5 seedlings, which I plan to try in various spots in the garden - but I might keep one in the greenhouse just incase! The seedlings look like bedding plants in the early stages - petunias or nicotiana - but are very fast-growing. Mine are about 30cm tall now and the stems are thickening and becoming woody. Seed is available from Chiltern seeds - I think they still llist it as acnistus.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Gail on June 28, 2017, 12:09:50 AM
My iochroma survived outside here last winter. Not flowering yet but it was badly hit by red spider mite last year...
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ruweiss on July 02, 2017, 09:44:56 PM
Martin, your Mutisia decurrens looks great, I was not succesful with it until now, but
Mutisia spinosa grows and flowers profusely at our garden fence and the resulting seeds
germinated readily this year. The plant was raised from wild seed collected by Vojtech Holubec
at Villa Pehuenia in Argentina, elevation 1500 m.
The plant is hardier than I thoght, the unusual severe late  frosts in  this April did not harm it
at all.

Picture Nr.4 shows a seedhead in September last year
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 02, 2017, 11:10:36 PM
Rudi, nice plant. We also grow Mutisia spinosa - it has now almost reached the top of a gingko tree. It can be difficult to prune. If you cut back into the old brown stems it doesn't always regrow. We also have it seeding into a nearby raised bed.
Last year we planted a Mutisia oligodon, growing through a Berberis empetrifolia but it has not yet flowered. We have photographed this species in the wild - it is low growing (compared with M. spinosa) and has neat pink flower.  We have seen it growing on the eastern side of the Andes in steppe conditions. The images below were taken in Chile last January. The plants are growing through spiny cushions of Mulinum spinosum in Las Lajas National Park at about 1500m. They are growing in volcanic cinder (scoria).
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 03, 2017, 09:47:28 AM
Mutisia spinosa in the wild. Paso Cordoba

Murisia retrorsa, Salto del Agrio
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 03, 2017, 09:07:30 PM
Gerrit, nice Mutisia spinosa - we have occasionally seen the white form in the wild. I think it looks better than some of the dirty pink forms in cultivation. Mutisia retrorsa is very much a dry steppe species and we have seen it in the central steppe over to the Atlantic coast of northern Patagona. Not sure if this is in cultivation.
These small mutsias are quite beautiful. We saw several species in Chile last January. We have tried these from Flores & Watson seed some years ago without much success, but now I know where they grow I think I would stand more chance of success. I have seed from Chileflora - I just hope it germinates!
Below are 3 species from our Chile trip - all should be hardy. Mutisia sinuata is photographed at the small ski resort of Lagunilla. Mutisia subulata f. rosmarinifolia and M. linearifolia are spectacular dwarves, here both photographed in the Maule valley.  In M. linearifolia the ray florets are sterile and the orange-red style is elongated.

Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ruweiss on July 03, 2017, 09:38:57 PM
Martin and Gerrit, many thanks for your quick and informative replies.
30 years ago I tried to cultivate some Mutisia species without longer succes,but
don't know if the colder winters or the lack of experience were the reason.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 03, 2017, 10:21:46 PM
They are spectacular indeed Martin, some in two colours, what a gorgeous plants and also dwarf forms. How dwarf? Do you have any idea?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: johnw on July 04, 2017, 12:03:15 AM
Fantastic Mutisias everyone.  I especially like Martin's oligodon.  Martin you say it climbs up a Berberis emnpetriformis, here that shrub only gets knee-high at best.  How big does it get there?

I grew a Mutisia oligodon several years ago, it sprouted in mid May and by July was this size, it then promptly died.  I blame one steamy day at 29c on its demise.  Had it in a gritty pumice-laced mix and then wondered how on earth I would ever transplant it without a major disturbance to the root system. Need a straight-sided square pot with a removable bottom!

john
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 04, 2017, 09:18:43 AM
John, fantastic rate of growth for your mutisia. Various references give Mutisia oligodon as reaching about 30cm. We have seen it to about 40cm in the wild. It is often confused in cultivation with smaller forms of other climbing pink species such as M. spinosa.  The very toothed leaves on your plant suggest it might be M. ilicifolia.
Gerrit, the three 'dwarf' species are all low growing. M. linearifolia is perhaps 10-20cm, usually sprawling over the ground, sometimes growing through other low plants. The other two (M. subulata & M. sinuata) scramble through low shrubs and are generally up to about 40cm.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 08, 2017, 11:42:47 AM
Junellia micrantha

1. My garden
2. In Patagonia, Volcan Tromen
3. In Patagonia, Primeros Pinos
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 08, 2017, 02:55:23 PM
Gerrit, good to see Junellia micrantha growing well for you It is one of the few junellias that grows well outside for us, though never covering itself in flowers as it can in the wild. In the wild it often grows in flat areas or depressions which may be moist or even wet in spring, becoming drier in summer.
On our 2015 AGS Tour we found a population of white-flowered J. micrantha on the north side of Lago Cardiel in Argentina's Santa Cruz Province. This would be a wonderful introduction:
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: hamparstum on July 08, 2017, 03:12:38 PM
Hello, I'm so pleased with all your cultivation efforts! I was wondering if anyone has tried introducing Anarthrophyllum ( i.e rigidum) into cultivation. We have a university student working ( Matias Sanchez) here with us, who is considering it and if there is any information he would greatly benefit from it. I'll gladly pass it , since he is not fluent with english. Thank you.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 08, 2017, 03:13:41 PM
A wonderful plant indeed. It make me think of the many flowers of an Androsace. But perhaps it is disappointing in our environment. I think, my junellia is poor, when one sees it in real. I presume you have brought some cuttings home.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 08, 2017, 05:04:38 PM
Arturo,I don't think anybody has been successful with anarythrophyllums in the UK - I could be wrong. Many tried growing A. desideratum from Flores & Watson seed - it grew but didn't flower for us. You probably stand much more chance of growing anarthrophyllum species in Bariloche. Marcela Ferreyra, who you may know, lives in Bariloche and may be able to help. She has recently retired from the university.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on July 08, 2017, 05:07:25 PM
We were among those growing A. desideratum from Flores & Watson seed  - it grew quite well for several years but never flowered.  It is the only Anarthrophyllum we've ever tried .
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: hamparstum on July 08, 2017, 06:15:07 PM
The species that is under trial here at the university is Anarthrophyllum strigulipetalum, which is a short bush quite adaptable to a rock garden setting. Germination was successful with scarification with sand paper.  These are recent trials so there is no information of growth speed or ways to speed them up. Since they are a local native species in due course of (???) time they should flower. Like what occurr with many treasured gems in nature, one would love to see them doing their thing as profusely in a garden setting. Hardly ever that happens...But that is a challenge for future breeders as the breadth of cultivated plants widen...
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 08, 2017, 08:30:14 PM
Arturo, A. strigulipetalum, with its bicoloured flowers, is perhaps the most beautiful species in the genus. Unfortunately I don't think seed has been available in the UK. Let us know how the trials go. It would be certainly worth trying here if it ever becomes available. Below are images of the species from the road between Villa Pehuenia and Zapala:
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Mark Griffiths on July 17, 2017, 03:27:57 PM
are there any suppliers of South American seed? I got some things from Watson and of course Archibalds but wondering if there is anyone now selling seed?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: David Nicholson on July 17, 2017, 04:32:45 PM
http://www.chileflora.com/ (http://www.chileflora.com/)

I have ordered in the past but not of late.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Mark Griffiths on July 17, 2017, 05:07:14 PM
thanks David!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: johnralphcarpenter on July 17, 2017, 06:38:14 PM
I think they are out of business - see http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12220.msg343944#msg343944 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12220.msg343944#msg343944)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on July 17, 2017, 06:45:29 PM
Mark, there are few sources for Patagonian seed. Chileflora is still selling seed - I had some from them recently, though I'm not sure that they restock seed as often as they used to do. Vojtec Holubec sometimes has South American seed. I think he is planning a trip soon, so may have fresh seed next year. Gerd Stopp may also be travelling to Patagonia, so expect more plants for sale from him in the next few years.
Mutisia and some other Patagonian seed is occasionally is available through the various seed distributions.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Neil on July 17, 2017, 07:44:40 PM
Chileflora are still going

 http://www.chileflora.com/Florachilena/FloraEnglish/ESeeds.htm (http://www.chileflora.com/Florachilena/FloraEnglish/ESeeds.htm)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 18, 2017, 05:00:27 PM
I ordered seeds in 2016 and they arrived late autumn. About 25 packages, about 7 forgotten and some twice. Mr. Belov apologized telling, the seeds were no longer his core business. And sent back my money. Less then 50% of the seeds germinated. I was not surprised by that, because in the past most of the seeds did not germinate at all.

So ordering form Chileflora is gamble.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 18, 2017, 05:03:35 PM
Seeds, who did germinate are Caiophora chuquitensis.

What you see is a flower, which is not opened yet. I wonder whether it wil do or not.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: johnralphcarpenter on July 18, 2017, 05:35:59 PM
As I said here: http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12220.msg343944#msg343944 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12220.msg343944#msg343944) , I ordered seeds in 2015, the website took my money but no seeds arrived. I eventually got my money back. Best avoided.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Mark Griffiths on July 19, 2017, 10:40:21 AM
ok thanks for the warnings.

In a quite different sphere i got an e-mail regarding a technical issue from a software supplier saying it was no longer his core work and no real solution.

Lesson for me that should I ever set up my own little business I need to think about how I'd finally wind it up - something it would be good for others to think about perhaps.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 19, 2017, 08:01:21 PM
Francoa appendiculata
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on July 19, 2017, 09:47:31 PM
A very nice picture, Gerrit. Not only the plant in the foreground... shows sometimes the wall in the background a little more exactly.

Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on August 03, 2017, 02:13:55 PM
In flower at the moment in one of our raised beds is one of our favourite Patagonian shrubs, Colletia ulicina. Grown originally from Chileflora seed, this member of the Rhamnaceae (sea buckthorn family) is now about 8 years old, with  a spread of about 80cm and about 40-50cm high. It flowers July-early September and is very attractive to bees. In nature its main pollinator seems to by the hummingbird Sephanoides sephanoides, though bees including the enormous (largest in the world!) bumble bee Bombus dahlbomii also act as pollinators. Colletia is a plant of woodland margins at 400-1500m, occurring in Central Chile & Argentina, extending south into northern Patagonia. There is a mature plant on the rockery at Kew. The shrub has extremely sharp hard spines much akin to gorse.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on August 03, 2017, 02:52:44 PM
Super strong colour - have you tried your hand as a virtual hummingbird, Martin?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on August 03, 2017, 03:36:37 PM
I am very much enthusiastically from the beauty of this plant. The blossoms are breathtaking. What great colour and form. However, I also find the foliage very weird and interesting. It looks like a needle wood. Also the size described by you is perfect for the Alpinum. Does this plant in autumn get then fruits? Please, something else reports about this incredibly nice plant.

The best greetings
Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on August 03, 2017, 03:50:57 PM
Thomas,
I haven't noticed fruit on the colletia in previous years, but I will check later this year and in the meantime, do my best impression of a hummingbird, though, with the number of bees on the flowers at the moment, if it is self-fertile, it should already be well and truly pollinated.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on August 03, 2017, 04:02:00 PM
My congratulation to this splendour. How do you increase this nice South American? By seed or cuttings?
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on August 11, 2017, 06:04:51 PM
Three weeks ago, I have posted pictures of Caiophora chuquitensis, with flowers which stayed closed. The plant produced a new stem. And now with a glorious flower.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on August 11, 2017, 08:08:39 PM
We see the attractive foliage very well. Gerrit, along with the complicated sculpture of the flower.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on August 23, 2017, 10:07:34 AM
All these wonderful descriptions and images of amazing Patagonian species and still no-one has mentioned the inestimable beauty that is Ranunculus semiverticillatus, surely the queen of South America, the empress of the Andes? 
We are travelling to Patagonia in a few short months simply to prostrate ourselves at the high altar of this ravishing gem (it HAS to be in flower) and to photograph what is surely the most glorious buttercup in existence.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on August 23, 2017, 12:29:56 PM
Perhaps the lack of mentions about the glorious R. semiverticillatus is occasioned by the intractibility of growing this in cultivation, let alone flowering it in captivity?  ::)

I hope to goodness you  do find it in flower on your trip, Cliff, I'm not sure the world is ready for your level of distress should that not be the case!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on August 23, 2017, 02:21:35 PM
Totally agree Cliff. In fact it's so beautiful taxonomists have now put it in its own genus, as Callianthemoides semiverticillata. It's why we chose it for the front cover of our book!
Like many dwellers in unstable scree habitats, this is near impossible in cultivation. Its rootstock may be well over 30cm down and often in flowing water during snowmelt.
I also hope to find it when we visit several of its sites at the end of the year. Watch out for the rare pink form. Leaf colour also varies.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on August 23, 2017, 03:55:14 PM
Amazing images, Martin ... hope our paths cross in a faraway place, somewhere close to that pink and perfect form.  :)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: David Nicholson on August 23, 2017, 06:12:01 PM
Hope you get a chance to meet the Irish specialist tour guide, Pat O'Gonia Mr B. ::) :P ;)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on August 23, 2017, 06:25:36 PM
Boy, did I laugh at that, Mr N.   ::) ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on October 17, 2017, 02:19:19 PM
It is becoming spring in Patagonia. Perhaps that's why my Schizanthus grahammii starts flowering now.

Photo 1 and two: In culture, raised from seeds from Chileflora (2015)
Photo 3 taken in Patagonia 2013
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on October 17, 2017, 03:07:32 PM
Beautiful, Gerrit.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: David Nicholson on October 17, 2017, 05:15:02 PM
Very pretty........... I did mean the plant not ranunculus :P
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on October 17, 2017, 05:49:54 PM
Gutted, David ... ABSOLUTELY gutted!!!!!!
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: David Nicholson on October 17, 2017, 06:59:22 PM
 :o ;D
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on October 17, 2017, 09:38:09 PM
Cliff and David, thanks
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on October 31, 2017, 02:52:25 PM
Schizanthus grahammii in full bloom now.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on October 31, 2017, 03:03:15 PM
Beautiful, Gerrit ... thanks for posting.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on October 31, 2017, 06:55:07 PM
Beutiful flower Gerrit.
Remember to collect seed as this species usually dies after flowering.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on October 31, 2017, 07:41:51 PM
Wonderfully... Gerrit. How high is this plant?

Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on October 31, 2017, 09:31:45 PM
Beutiful flower Gerrit.
Remember to collect seed as this species usually dies after flowering.

I knew it is annual, or monocarpic, but maybe short-living, i hope.
Seeds will be difficult, i think. November is coming without pollinating insects. Another thing, it's not hardy, so i think, better cut all shoots, and protect the plant from frost and not waiting for seeds.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on October 31, 2017, 09:34:03 PM
Wonderfully... Gerrit. How high is this plant?

Thomas

Sorry Thomas, i know you prefer dwarf species. It is not dwarf at all, about 50/60 cm high.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on November 01, 2017, 09:10:35 AM
Gerrit,
You might try hand pollination - I think they are self fertile. I agree that it is probably too late in the year for successful seed set outside, but you could keep the flower stems in water indoors. Seed development in schizanthus is quite rapid. Alternatively, if there are any suitable shoots, you could try stem cuttings indoors.
Although unlikely to survive winters outdoors, we see them growing high up on ski slopes where they would be subjected to frost and covered by snow for most of the winter, but would regenerate from seed in spring.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on November 01, 2017, 02:44:13 PM
Good advice from you Martin.

I did handpollinate the flowers and during inspection of the plant, i noticed some seed pods growing from previous flowers. Bees did their job and i was not aware of it. Now i wait and hope for mild weather until Christmas in order to let the seeds ripe on the plant. When not, i will follow your suggestion and take cuttings for inside. There are suitable shoots indeed.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on January 07, 2018, 08:22:41 PM
Here again two South Americans without flowers... Benthamiella azorella and Nassauvia gaudichaudii.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on January 07, 2018, 08:33:55 PM
... and then something unusual. Normally we know Bolax gummifera in green. (image 1)
Now I got a small section with an extraordinary blue-grey color. (Picture 2) I hope that this metallic blue is still visible in summer.

Anybody else ever had that color before? If so, please report.

Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Martin Sheader on January 07, 2018, 09:54:19 PM
Thomas,
I looked through my images of Bolax and found one with blue leaves from Sierra del Toro (Torres del Paine). When leaves are fully expanded it would look closer to your plant. Eudema hauthalii is growing through the cushion.
Martin
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on January 07, 2018, 10:23:59 PM
Martin... Thank you for this beautiful picture and the quick answer. It looks a little unusual. But I like this blue mutation very much. But of course the green form is also great.

Like almost everything from this region.  :)

Since the picture of you was probably not taken in winter, I can hope that this color will be visible in the coming summer.

Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on January 08, 2018, 05:46:57 PM
... and then something unusual. Normally we know Bolax gummifera in green. (image 1)
Now I got a small section with an extraordinary blue-grey color. (Picture 2) I hope that this metallic blue is still visible in summer.

Anybody else ever had that color before? If so, please report.


Peculiar colour. Fingers crossed, it will continue producing blue leaves.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 26, 2018, 07:26:50 PM
All these wonderful descriptions and images of amazing Patagonian species and still no-one has mentioned the inestimable beauty that is Ranunculus semiverticillatus, surely the queen of South America, the empress of the Andes? 
We are travelling to Patagonia in a few short months simply to prostrate ourselves at the high altar of this ravishing gem (it HAS to be in flower) and to photograph what is surely the most glorious buttercup in existence.

Hello Cliff and all other fans of Ranunculus semiverticillatus...

I agree with you on all counts...it's probably one of the most beautiful plants in the world. I know the impressive pictures from last year's trips to Patagonia.

Last year a botanical friend gave me some small root pieces of this jewel. He wouldn't tell me where he got them. 😉

I gave myself no hope and paid no attention to the pot. While cleaning several old pots at the weekend I discovered it again...the current result can be seen. It was probably a little dark... that's why the long stem.

But the fact that life is actually in this pot makes me pretty happy. I will continue to report...when the gods are on my side. 😁😁

Thomas

Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 26, 2018, 07:37:21 PM
I have also been interested in the winter hardiness of Maihuenia for some time. That's why I deliberately didn't have a cover this winter. We all had extremes...warmth, rain and very cold days without snow. Surprisingly both representatives of this species look better this spring than in the years with coverage.

The experiment was successful.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on March 26, 2018, 10:08:37 PM
Fantastic Thomas, please, please, please keep those tiny gems alive ... give them light, air, wind, occasional rain and love in abundance.  We saw magnificent stands of these beauties on steep screes in Patagonia and they brought tears to my eyes. Congratulations and please keep posting images of their progress.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: astragalus on March 27, 2018, 04:46:47 PM
Amazing to see seedlings of this plant. I agree with Cliff. They are an incredible sight; from the delicate-looking foliage to the huge white flowers with red on the backs of the petals and red stems - Nature didn't leave anything out on this one (except perhaps, the gorgeous seed pods that can be found on many plants of the Fabaceae).
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on March 27, 2018, 08:55:02 PM
Hello guys...

thank you for the words of encouragement. I will do everything I can to keep this gem alive as long as I can. But all specialists (Martin Sheader) write that this plant is impossible to cultivate. So if all my attention and devotion were not crowned with success, then the Andean gods were not on my side.

But then at least I tried...but there are simply plants that just don't want to live in "captivity". For example, last year I had a seedling of legendary Gentiana urnula. Everything looked promising...but he died in a few days. I think that's the way it should be.

But for now, I'm hopeful I can give this unique beauty a good home.

Thomas

Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 03, 2018, 08:41:35 PM
Hello Cliff and Martin

Today a short update of Ranunculus semiverticillatus.

Contrary to all suspicions, my little copy  is actually still alive. For one week even a fourth plant shoot shows up.😊
The form of growth is probably a little strange...but if I put the plant in the direct sun, it would die immediately in the heat. Or the long shoots are normal...because in the wilderness some centimetres probably have to be overcome by scree.     I don't know.

Now some questions...I would like to plant the plant in a suitable pot soon. It is 20 cm high. Should I wait until the above-ground parts of the plant retreat?
And should I sink the plant a little deeper into the pot...so that such long shoots do not develop again?

Perhaps you or Mr Martin Sheader have an answer to these questions. I don't want to make any mistakes with this particular plant.

Thanks in advance and best regards
Thomas


Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ranunculus on June 04, 2018, 07:56:34 AM
Hi Thomas, I'm replying to your post from Corvara in the Dolomites where we are currently leading wildflower walks.  Congratulations on keeping these remarkable seedlings alive ... such a shame that they are all now growing in such a tiny pot and will need to be moved on quite quickly, you could have experimented with different techniques for growing them on ... even to the extent of placing such a pot with a single seedling into the bottom of a long tom pot and gently filling in around the elongated stem with light, dry graded material. 
I would be very tempted to wait until the current foliage dies back and move the entire pot (without unnecessary disturbance) into as tall and large a pot as you can manage?  I  would place the current root ball at least a third of the way down the tall pot and ensure that the top third of the compost is very friable and gritty. I realise that all the seedlings will remain in the same pot but in this way they will have space to spread out without too much disturbance.  But, having said all this, you are the one who has managed to produce four very healthy (if elongated) seedlings and you should follow your own instincts as to the future ... they obviously enjoy your hospitality.  When you have a large colony growing in pots and in your garden then Martin and I will, I'm certain, be VERY glad to purchase some of your spare plants.  Keep up the excellent work.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 04, 2018, 08:33:27 AM
Hi Cliff

Thank you for the quick answer and the encouraging words. I'll heed your clues and wait for him to repot. You can rest assured that I will continue to devote my attention to this jewel.

Perhaps it will be my personal "year of rarities"... Ranunculus semiverticillatus and Notothlaspi rosulatum. Also Diapensia lapponica is still alive...It can go on like this. 😊

I wish you a wonderful time in the Dolomites.

By the way, a few days ago I discovered a tiny seedling of Lecanophora ameghinoi. Sierra Taquetrèn, Chubut, 1050 meters. Keeping your fingers crossed might help.

Thomas

Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 26, 2018, 07:50:51 PM
Some flowers from previous months:

1. Oxalis laciniata 'Astrid'.
2. Oxalis laciniata 'Seven Bells'.
3. Nolana reichii, producing flowers one by one, but for several months.
4. Maihuenia poeppigii, Many years old. Probably never flowering. Hardy till minus 10, so far Thomas, outside under a roof.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 26, 2018, 08:17:30 PM
Maihuenia poeppigii, in the wild in Argentina.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 26, 2018, 08:43:34 PM
1. Viola polypoda
2. Calandrinia umbellata, was suffering from a wet winter. This is all what remained.
3, 4.Calandrinia ranunculina
5. Calandrinia fuegiana
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 27, 2018, 07:22:48 AM
1,2. Schizanthus litoralis.
3,4. Schizanthus tricolor.
5.    Schizanthus x wisentonensis.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 27, 2018, 07:27:21 AM
1. Ourisia microphylla.
2. Senecio skottsbergii.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on July 27, 2018, 07:34:03 AM
Ourisia microphylla in the wild in Argentina
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on July 27, 2018, 07:39:55 AM
Absolutely fantastic... Gerrit. Here you see the real master. 😊

Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: gerrit on August 18, 2018, 06:23:11 PM
Rhodophiala bakeri with flower.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on August 26, 2018, 05:52:21 PM
from the Chilean Andes, Region VII, 2500 m...Oxalis squamata
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on February 16, 2019, 09:32:52 PM
The filigree beauty of this cuttings of Bolax gummifera can only be seen under great magnification. It is again a "mutation" with a bluish coloration.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on April 13, 2019, 07:15:02 PM
Draba antarctica has come well over the winter.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 11, 2019, 04:02:29 PM
The tiny flowers of Azorella ameghinoi are so inconspicuous that you hardly notice them.  But a sign that she feels well...until now.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Steve Garvie on May 11, 2019, 08:27:11 PM
Calceolaria uniflora -I’m not sure if this is the real deal or not. Raised from seed purchased from one of the Czech guys. It can’t tolerate a Scottish winter in the open but is fine with overhead protection.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/32861729787_c6854a692f_o_d.jpg)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 11, 2019, 10:04:53 PM
Hello Steve...

I am not a real specialist for the incredibly beautiful flora of Patagonia. I recognize on your photo a somewhat jagged edge of the leaves...is that correct ? It could be that Calceolaria darwinii produces different variants. I don't know. Fact is that you must be a very happy person. What a great glory.  ;D

I attach again some photos from the past...then you see the details of my former copies.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Steve Garvie on May 11, 2019, 11:16:12 PM
Thanks Thomas.
Looking at your images I don’t think my plants can be the true darwinii/uniflora.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 12, 2019, 09:46:52 AM
Thanks Thomas.
Looking at your images I don’t think my plants can be the true darwinii/uniflora.

Steve...
Your Calceolaria is perhaps a hybrid? Because I clearly recognize the white bar at the "lip".
Anyway, I am totally enthusiastic about the upright standing toothed foliage and the shape and colour of the flowers. The number of flowers is considerable.
I hope that you can harvest some valuable seeds and preserve this treasure.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 30, 2019, 11:04:09 AM
For three years Calceolaria penellii has stood with me in the rock garden... without cover. This year she blooms for the first time... Viva Argentina 😎
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 01, 2019, 11:39:32 PM
Does anyone here have any experience with the cultivation of Rhodophiala araucana? I was able to discover some seedlings today. My first idea would be a very permeable substrate with high lava content...in a high pot.

I am grateful for any hint... as always.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: johnw on June 02, 2019, 03:50:28 AM
No experience specifically to R. araucana though I grow it but haven't flowered it.  I initially got a Hippeastrum elwesii from Harry Jans that came from Göteborg BG in 1996.  Later it was id'ed as Rhodophiala elwesii, a few years later R.araucana, then R. montana. I have a feeling it will change yet again.  In any event I have grown a dozen or more spp. since then and even flowered a few.  Your instincts are right - deep pot but don't overpot, neck of the bulb, once a good size, above the grit mulch.  They can havean extremely long neck so can pull themselves deep down. They take awhile to settle in when repotted - I must do all of mine this year.  An extremely well-drained mix with lots of grit and pumice seems to suit them.  I avoid peat for fear of stagnospora curtisii though have never seen it on them. Iif placing outdoors in summer be wary of the narcissuz bulb fly - i lost a very big pot of my first one which was a great flowerer as I set it outside for a week, the timing must have been perfect.  As the roots seem perennial I give all the ocassional drink during the dormant period despite advice against this. I've tried to gather information on the species requirements their growing periods - Chilaeflora/PBS and there was one site dedicated to Rhodophiala but it seems tpo have disappeared - and, that information is for the most part contradictory & suspect.  PBS says araucana spends the dormant period very dry under snow so should be able to tolerant a dry poeriod which may induce bud formation.  Good luck.

john.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 02, 2019, 07:40:41 AM
Hello John

Many thanks for the extensive information on further cultivation. Very well described and very helpful to me. Great.
I have sunk special pots for alpine plants (Townsendia, Acantholimon etc.) with very long roots in the sand.   I will mix a special substrate of lava, pumice and only very few humus components.

Thanks again
Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: johnw on June 03, 2019, 01:34:41 PM
Thomas   - If plunging in a sand bed be aware the bulb may escape through the drainage hole.

john
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on June 03, 2019, 02:51:39 PM
Thomas   - If plunging in a sand bed be aware the bulb may escape through the drainage hole.

john

John... what an important clue. Many thanks for that. So I will place a small piece of water permeable fleece between the drainage layer and the actual substrate. Then the bulb cannot flee.
This is exactly how I will proceed with Solenomelus segethii.

Thanks
Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on July 19, 2019, 04:18:47 PM
Another newcomer from Chile...Acaena alpina. Here the foliage and the upright growth form is probably the special thing. If someone should have already experiences with it, I would be pleased about all information.

Thanks
Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ashley on July 19, 2019, 04:51:43 PM
Just take care Thomas  ;) ;D
Recently I found Acaena ovalifolia rapidly spreading along forestry roads as an invasive species :'(
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on July 19, 2019, 05:17:26 PM
Just take care Thomas  ;) ;D
Recently I found Acaena ovalifolia rapidly spreading along forestry roads as an invasive species :'(

Hi Ashley

You're absolutely right...many acaenas can be very troublesome and invasive. Acaena ovalifolia is definitely one of them. Acaena alpina seems to be more reserved...at least that's what the pictures on the internet show. I will observe it...thanks.  ;)
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on August 24, 2019, 03:03:01 PM
The first flowers of this Chilean diva have just opened... Montiopsis umbellata...

edit - 
Quote
I just got the right name for this plant from other German plant friends. It is Talinum calycinum... I apologize for this mistake. I had no time yet for a detailed research...and trusted the label. ...it was a Gift.   
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: hamparstum on August 24, 2019, 06:27:06 PM
The first flowers of this Chilean diva have just opened... Montiopsis umbellata...
Thomas I was wondering if you have a picture of the whole plant. It reminds me a lot  of the wilder Lewisias. Some botanists have it under Calandrinia u. That genus is also full of gems to be tried out  in the Alpine garden.
Arturo
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on August 26, 2019, 03:29:45 PM
Thomas I was wondering if you have a picture of the whole plant. It reminds me a lot  of the wilder Lewisias. Some botanists have it under Calandrinia u. That genus is also full of gems to be tried out  in the Alpine garden.
Arturo

Hello Arturo...

I am very happy to hear from you again...
I just got the right name for this plant from other German plant friends. It is Talinum calycinum... I apologize for this mistake. I had no time yet for a detailed research...and trusted the label. ...ist was a Gift.

So sorry again for the wrong name....

So the article can be deleted... I wouldn't mind...😉
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: hamparstum on August 26, 2019, 03:48:16 PM
Thomas, now that I saw the full plant in a picture
see:
http://www.robsplants.com/plants/TalinCalyc, (http://www.robsplants.com/plants/TalinCalyc,) my intuition proved correct. Talinum=Phemeranthus belongs to the Portulacaceae, of which recently the Montiaceae have been split away. The only thing wrong is that it belongs to the US prairies instead of Patagonia. Other than  that, it a very worthwhile plant for a rock garden! If it ever reaches my garden then it will be for sure part of the plant world of Patagonia.... ;D
Arturo
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on September 15, 2019, 11:17:18 AM
Just now I was on a small plant exchange in the botanical garden in Adorf. While walking through the Alpinum I found Senecio triodon...
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on July 31, 2020, 08:25:02 PM
A partial success with Blumenbachia prietea... Please cross your fingers for me...🤞😏
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Maggi Young on August 01, 2020, 11:43:44 AM
 For  those  wondering  what Thomas' plant  will grow  up to be... here's  a  photo of it  from Vojtech Holubec's site:

[attachimg=1]
Blumenbachia prietea

https://holubec.wbs.cz/Argentina.html
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on August 02, 2020, 10:54:45 AM
For  those  wondering  what Thomas' plant  will grow  up to be... here's  a  photo of it  from Vojtech Holubec's site:

(Attachment Link)
Blumenbachia prietea

https://holubec.wbs.cz/Argentina.html

Maggi... thank you for showing me this great photo of Vojtech... it encourages me.

There are two more plants from this "area of life"... here again I could use "spiritual support"... because the cultivation of South American alpine plants is a real challenge here... but I am persistent...😏

Trichocline reptans
Andryala agardhii

Greetings
Thomas
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 15, 2022, 02:42:17 PM
So that this topic does not come to a complete standstill, once again a modest contribution from me...

Today... five years after sowing, I discovered for the first time a beginning of a flower on Acaena alpina. The seed originally came from the Reserva nacional altos de lircay. I am very curious about the final result.🤞
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 15, 2022, 02:43:35 PM
And two more representatives of the breathtaking flora of Patagonia united in one picture... the two , "sisters" Calceolaria fothergillii and Calceolaria darwinii.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: hamparstum on May 15, 2022, 05:19:46 PM
Thomas! aren't they just so lovely....I doubt that in nature their background would  be tuffa stones. Here most possibly very well weathered glacial granite boulders. The brown/sienna colours actually accent their colours reddish/burnt orange. Truly gems. Thanks for posting these photos!
Arturo
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 15, 2022, 10:02:01 PM
Hello Arturo

I am particularly pleased that you, of all people, have responded to my pictures today.

The stones in the background only serve as a pleasant frame for photographing the plants that are in pots. The two Calceolaria are not in calcareous substrate... but in very permeable mineral soil with maximum drainage and a rather neutral level. If the tuff stones in the background have caused confusion, I apologise.

On this occasion I have another unanswered question.... a few years ago I got a small plant that I thought had been lost in 2019. The name was Draba antarctica....
Now, after three years, a spontaneous seedling has appeared and even flowered. However, renewed searches on the internet did not produce any hits with this name. Maybe you (or another specialist) can give an ID for this small plant.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: hamparstum on May 15, 2022, 10:49:03 PM
Thomas afterr searching a bit your plant looks close to the following:
https://sib.gob.ar/especies/draba-magellanica?

Draba magellanica.

Draba antarctica is a misnomer. The botanical literature does not have any references to that name. Both Kew or the Darwinion do not have that name even in the synonyms.

Your photo clearly shows a brassicaceae and a highly probable Draba.

I hope it helps you out!

No need for apologies for photo of the Calceolarias. They are just beautiful, the backdrop just adds to the charm.

Arturo
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ruweiss on May 21, 2022, 09:01:56 PM
Sisyrinchium humile in the Alpine House:
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 24, 2022, 09:29:57 AM
Sisyrinchium humile in the Alpine House:

Hello Rudi

Sisyrinchium humile is now flowering in my garden too. However, it is in my rock garden all year round without any protection. So it seems to be immune to heat and winter wetness (?)... at least the picture doesn't show anything contrary...😉
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 24, 2022, 09:32:45 AM
...the same applies to Sisyrinchium laetum, by the way. No protection...only loving care...😂
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ruweiss on May 24, 2022, 08:41:07 PM
Thomas, thank you for your pictures and your report. It is good to know about the hardiness of the
2 Sisyrinchium species and I will try it in my garden.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: Leucogenes on May 26, 2022, 10:49:23 AM
Patience is sometimes rewarded...first flower on Solenomelus segethii ...four years after sowing.
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: fermi de Sousa on May 26, 2022, 02:06:29 PM
Our mate, Dave Toole, is presenting a talk on Central Patagonia by zoom for the Alpine Garden Society Victorian Group (Australia) on Saturday May 28th at 2pm Australian Eastern Standard Time (5am in Scotland!).
This is a free event and can be accessed through https://eventbrite.com.au/e/central-patagonia-land-of-fire-and-ice-tickets-346475516597 (https://eventbrite.com.au/e/central-patagonia-land-of-fire-and-ice-tickets-346475516597)
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: The plant world of Patagonia
Post by: ashley on May 28, 2022, 06:57:28 AM
Dave's talk and photos were excellent.  Look out for the recording if Fermi can make it available.
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