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Author Topic: March in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 5081 times)

ashley

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March in the Northern Hemisphere
« on: March 02, 2024, 08:26:59 AM »
Can anyone please identify this willow?
I suspect it's fairly widely available in Scotland.

Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Redmires

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2024, 11:48:34 AM »
There will be people with far more shrub expertise than me, but might it be Salix gracistyla 'Mt Aso' ?

Robert

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2024, 08:12:07 PM »


Rhododendron occidentale ‘Early First Contact’ is coming into bloom. This clone is one of 5 selections I made from plants found in the canyon of the North Fork of the Feather River in 2004. I became aware of these plants back in the early 1980’s when my fishing friend George and I would go fishing on Chips Creek, a tributary of the North Fork.

These clones have proven to be extremely heat tolerant and tolerant of less than ideal growing conditions here in our Sacramento garden.



The 5 selections I made from the North Fork site all bloom 2 months earlier than the type species. There were many other Rhododendron occidentale plants growing at this site, some of which bloom much later in the season. The large yellow blotch on the upper petal and pink floral tubes are attractive characteristics of this selection. The yellowish coloration of the expanding flower buds is unusual for the inland race of Rhododendron occidentale, and is very attractive.



This is a nice batch of seedlings of Primula (Dodecatheon) hendersonii RMB 944. This seed accession came from a unique ecotype of this species I found at an elevation of 5,105 feet (1,556 meters) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of El Dorado County, California. The scapes of this ecotype are much shorter than those of the type species and they bloom about a month later. This ecotype of Primula hendersonii can be placed, taxonomically, somewhere between Primula hendersonii and Primula subalpina/P. hendersonii var. yosemitanum, found in the Central and Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains. This ecotype lacks the red roots associated with P. subalpina and is found well north of the range of P. subalpina.

This ecotype has grown well in our Sacramento garden for many years and appears capable of hybridizing with other forms of Primula hendersonii. In addition, this ecotype appears to have some tolerance to summertime irrigation when the plants are dormant. Additional trials and research are needed.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
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Leena

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2024, 02:47:40 PM »
This is a nice batch of seedlings of Primula (Dodecatheon) hendersonii RMB 944. This seed accession came from a unique ecotype of this species I found at an elevation of 5,105 feet (1,556 meters) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of El Dorado County, California.

This ecotype has grown well in our Sacramento garden for many years and appears capable of hybridizing with other forms of Primula hendersonii. In addition, this ecotype appears to have some tolerance to summertime irrigation when the plants are dormant. Additional trials and research are needed.

Do you think it is also hardier as comes from a higher elevation?

Very nice azaleas! :)
Leena from south of Finland

Gabriela

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2024, 05:05:19 PM »
Early spring here in ON, although the winter is not gone yet. Huge variations in temperatures from one day to another.

Galanthus nivalis. G. elwesii and hybrids have been flowering since February.





Hellborus purpurascens, usually the first, or the second after H. niger.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
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Robert

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2024, 05:54:21 PM »
Hi Leena,

Yes, the high elevation forms of Primula (Dodecatheon) hendersonii are certainly hardier to cold weather than the lower elevation forms of this species. How much cold hardiness they might possess remains to be determined. Additional trials need to be conducted beyond the range of our Sacramento garden.

Currently the site where I originally gathered seed is covered by 30 inches (76.2 cm) of snow. On 28 February of this year there was no snow on the ground. With climatic change, fluctuating periods between snow cover and snow free conditions are typical for this site during the winter months. When there is no snow cover, it is not unusual to have below freezing temperatures penetrate well below the soil surface. I have researched this site for many years and have extensive site-specific climatic data sets, as well as data on soil temperatures fluctuations at various depths, and the response of many plant species to the many environmental variables they encounter. It is all very interesting, and hopefully will eventually lead to improved plants for the garden.

If I remember correctly, your garden will start into early spring growth within the coming 30 days. I look forward to seeing your garden as it emerges into new growth. It is always such a pleasure to see.   :)



Here in California spring is progressing. Pictured above is Erythranthe bicolor RMB 1017. This is a new accession for me. I obtained the seeds from a relatively low elevation site (3,354 feet, 1,022 meters) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The plants are noticeably precocious in their blooming cycle compared to the higher elevation forms of this species that I grow.



Dipterostemon capitatus ssp. capitatus RMB 1003 is another new accession. This form was obtained from 1,525 feet (465 meters) in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. This form is also a very early bloomer. This is not an unusual characteristic of this species, but it does extend the blooming period for this species in our garden.

Gabriela

Your spring garden is looking great.  8)   :)
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Leena

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2024, 07:13:24 AM »
Gabriela, you have had a really nice and early spring this year, and everything is already flowering so much! :)
For some reason it seems that when you have warmer winter, here it is colder and vice versa. There is still snow, and even when days may be one or two degrees above zero when the nights are -5 - -10C snowmelting is really slow.
Robert, you are right: spring comes here in April. :)
Picture from last week.

Leena from south of Finland

Mariette

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2024, 11:16:07 AM »
Robert, the range of flowering plants in Your garden is amazing compared with the limited choice we enjoy right now! Your Rhododendron occidentale is very beautiful and scented, I trust, too. This species is available in Europe, also, but would flower one or two months later. Nevertheless, it´s good to learn that it´s rather heat-resistant. In my garden, I lost 2/3 of the rhododendrons thriving for 30 years due to the hotter summers since 2013.

Dipterostemon capitatus ssp. capitatus is a very pretty perennial hardly known hereabouts, but would require rock garden conditions in areas with often very humid summers like ours, I fear.

Erythranthe bicolor has a very attractive flowers, too. As an annual, it perhaps might prove more adapting to our climate.

Gabriela, it´s very comforting that flowers in Your garden do not differ much from those in ours right now! The flowers of Your Helleborus purpurascens have an exceptionally good blue!

Robert

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2024, 04:08:08 PM »
Robert, the range of flowering plants in Your garden is amazing compared with the limited choice we enjoy right now! Your Rhododendron occidentale is very beautiful and scented, I trust, too. This species is available in Europe, also, but would flower one or two months later. Nevertheless, it´s good to learn that it´s rather heat-resistant. In my garden, I lost 2/3 of the rhododendrons thriving for 30 years due to the hotter summers since 2013.

Hi Mariette,

Right now the garden is just starting into its main spring blooming period.

Yes, my early blooming forms of Rhododendron occidentale are very fragrant. The coastal race of Rhododendron occidentale is the dominant form circulating in horticulture. The coastal race and the interior race from the Sierra Nevada Mountains are similar in appearance, but very different in their tolerance of high temperatures and low atmospheric humidity during the summertime. For example, most of the well-known Smith-Mossman selections of Rhododendron occidentale will not survive or grow poorly in interior California gardens where temperatures are extremely high during the summer. In addition, much of the flower color distinction of the Smith-Mossman selections is dependent on cool temperatures during their flowering cycle. In hot weather the pigmentations are much less intense.

We have lost almost all of our Rhododendrons that once grew in our Sacramento garden. Many deciduous azaleas still grow well. Rhododendron austrinum is a good example.


Dipterostemon capitatus ssp. capitatus is a very pretty perennial hardly known hereabouts, but would require rock garden conditions in areas with often very humid summers like ours, I fear.


Many of the Themidaceae species are tolerant of some summertime moisture. It all depends on the species. Triteleia hyacinthina is frequently found in seasonally borderline hydric sites. I have found this species to be very tolerant of summertime irrigation in our Sacramento garden. Other species have tolerance to summertime soil moisture too. Trials need to be conducted.


Erythranthe bicolor has a very attractive flowers, too. As an annual, it perhaps might prove more adapting to our climate.


Erythranthe bicolor is found in vernally moist sites. At the high end of their elevation range they are frequently seen growing and blooming where lingering snow recently melted. I strongly suspect that they would be very easy to cultivate. The plants I have grown over the years have demonstrated a range of genetic variability. I have a number of distinct breeding lines that I maintain. Additional trials are needed with this species too.



Our Sweetwater Creek selection of Erythronium multiscapideum is coming into bloom now. This seed accession is from 2017. The colony is growing and spreading rapidly after 7 years. Unlike our Deer Valley form of Erythronium multiscapideum this form spreads rapidly from underground rhizomes. It also does not bloom as profusely as our Deer Valley form. The colony from which I gathered seed was ancient and its size could be measured in square kilometers! Most of the plants grow under the dense chaparral plant canopy. Blooming plants have always been difficult to find within this colony of plants. I have been aware of this colony since the 1970’s and I have never observed a profuse blooming cycle.

The colonies of Erythronium multiscapideum from the Rubicon River canyon in the Sierra Nevada Mountains bloom profusely, or at least they did before an overgrowth of native brush began to encroach into this site. Recently, a wildfire burned through this area. I need to get back to this site and see how conditions have changed. There are other fascinating plants in this area too. This is another good reason to check on this site.



Many other California native annuals are just starting into bloom in our Sacramento garden. I grow many of my new miniature Narcissus hybrids in pots. Volunteer seedlings of California native annuals frequently come up in the pots. I always let some of them grow – maybe not such a good idea with the Narcissus seedlings – but it all seems to work out and I get to enjoy the blooming annuals. Pictured is Eschscholzia caespitosa and Nemophila maculata.



In this pot Eschscholzia caespitosa and Eschscholzia lobbii ‘Sundew’ are growing side-by-side. The Narcissus seedlings seem to grow up though the Eschscholzia foliage and grow well, sometimes even blooming. I keep first year seedlings weed free.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2024, 05:13:17 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

ruweiss

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2024, 08:14:22 PM »
Soldanella hungarica flowers very early in acid soil.
The strange flowers of Asarum maximum in the Alpine House. I tried it in the open garden, but
was not really succesful with it.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Gabriela

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2024, 11:48:26 PM »
The Soldanella is so lovely Rudi!

Leena, Mariette and Robert - thank you, I am happy to see early flowers, but it is not spring yet here! April is usually when the 'regular' spring starts.
It is unfortunate that we had some very warm days and rains and various species have sprung into growth. Last night again we returned to -6C, and next week winter will return. In such years, the early spring plants are compromised with too much variations from warm to cold and war again.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

ruweiss

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2024, 09:00:45 PM »
Thank you, Gabriela, this is the only Soldanella species which does well
in our hot garden.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Andre Schuiteman

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2024, 02:44:31 PM »

Rhododendron hippophaeoides 'Haba Shan' is always early, but this year even earlier than usual.

arisaema

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2024, 04:59:28 PM »
Phone pictures, so forgive the quality!



A different leaf form of Lysimachia christinae under lights inside



Corydalis sheareri survived the winter here uncovered



Corydalis flexuosa, a recent collection



Cyclamen coum has been in flower for well over a month



Eranthis stellata is going over



...while Allium aff. funkiifolium just started.



Corydalis yanhusuo, not very pretty color...



Corydalis fumariifolia showing a huge variability in foliage



...hunting neighbour's chickens

Mariette

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2024, 07:24:22 PM »
Very interesting plants and pictures, arisaema! No need to excuse for the quality! To grow Eranthis stellata in the garden is one of my dreams that will never become true. Allium aff. funkiifolium looks very interesting - what are its needs in the garden?

Andre, Your rhododendron has a sumptuous colour!

ruweiss, I like Your soldanella! When I started this garden, I was able to grow the ordinary S. montana for some years, but that´s long ago. I tried Asarum maximum in the garden, too, but it seems too prone to slugs.

The colony is growing and spreading rapidly after 7 years. Unlike our Deer Valley form of Erythronium multiscapideum this form spreads rapidly from underground rhizomes. It also does not bloom as profusely as our Deer Valley form. The colony from which I gathered seed was ancient and its size could be measured in square kilometers! Most of the plants grow under the dense chaparral plant canopy. Blooming plants have always been difficult to find within this colony of plants. I have been aware of this colony since the 1970’s and I have never observed a profuse blooming cycle.

The colonies of Erythronium multiscapideum from the Rubicon River canyon in the Sierra Nevada Mountains bloom profusely, or at least they did before an overgrowth of native brush began to encroach into this site.


Robert, it´s good to learn that some clones of Erythronium multiscapideum clump well whereas others don´t. I´ve got one which didn´t clump for more than 10 years, still there are two stalks only. At least it flowers regularly.  :) I noticed that clones of trilliums behave similarly, but wasn´t aware that it might be the same with Erythronium multiscapideum. Also, I haven´t heard that European E. densiflorum shows such differences in growth.

 


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