We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....  (Read 283771 times)

DaveM

  • Doctor Rock
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 553
  • Country: scotland
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2009, 04:39:43 PM »
Great thread. Good to see these pictures.

May I be so bold as to make a minor (technical) correction to the last post (and apologies if this may seem pedantic.....). In the superb picture of folded limestone beds from the Maritimes - this should read "anticline" instead of "syncline". Anticlines have beds inclined away from the crest of the fold, whereas in synclines the beds dip towards the axis.    :D :D :D

Also, a point of note for British readers: the rock name "diabase" is not often used here where the equivalent term is "dolerite".
« Last Edit: December 12, 2009, 04:44:21 PM by DaveM »
Dave Millward, East Lothian, Scotland

Lori S.

  • hiking & biking on our behalf !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1647
  • Country: ca
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2009, 05:11:22 PM »
   It is known, that stratification of layers of mud etc. at the bottom of the ancient seas was horizontal. My first picture is very rare (Northern Maritime Alps in France) and it is example of side pressing and folding the limestone layers into whole synclinal.

Pardon another nerdy geology comment, if you will... :)
Given that it seems the Alps formed by collision of plates and thrust faulting (same as the northern Rockies here), it is puzzling why visible evidence of such folding would be rare?  It's very visible here, with vertical and recumbent anticlines forming the peaks of many mountains.

What an excellent, inspiring thread!  I can see I need to get a few tonnes of rock in, and overhaul the entire yard!
Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 13117
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2009, 07:45:42 PM »
Terrific thread. Wonder if Maureen would buy me a couple of tons of rock for Christmas? :-\
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Lesley Cox

  • way down south !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16347
  • Country: nz
  • Gardening forever, house work.....whenever!
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2009, 08:49:17 PM »
A couple of tons wouldn't go far David. Better make it a couple of hundred tons. ;D
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

mark smyth

  • Hopeless Galanthophile
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15255
  • Country: gb
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2009, 09:54:13 PM »
ZZ, for you I promise to go to all rock features in N Ireland next April/May/June and take photos to post here.

I look forward to meeting you next November if not before.

Mark :D

ZZ hasnt seen these and it shows his enthusiasm has rubbed off on me. One day he will see them
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Lesley Cox

  • way down south !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16347
  • Country: nz
  • Gardening forever, house work.....whenever!
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2009, 10:46:34 PM »
Crevice gardening or Standing Stones? :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

mark smyth

  • Hopeless Galanthophile
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15255
  • Country: gb
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2009, 10:49:55 PM »
Dolomites  :D
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Stone Rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 98
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2009, 11:25:59 PM »
Thanks to geologists for help.

CREVICE BED IN PERSHORE

 

   When my old friend Ron Beeston was responsible for the show garden of the Alpine Garden Society in Pershore, he organized rebuilding one experimental bed into proper crevice bed there near to the large naturally designed scree. Ron was perfect in getting suitable stone, some special English kind of sandstone forming desks. He prepared big heap of soil mixture with professional care of retired nurseryman and he managed great amount of suitable plants from different sources. I had excellent team with Alan Furness and John Page (to mention two known stars) and other members of the AGS so the work was smooth. We planted plenty dwarf Daphnes including golden yellow Chinese D. calcicola ´Gang Ho Ba´ and only one daphne died there. Crevices in full sun all day are what make them to be compact and happy. I saw them yesterday at the AGS web site. The same success was with old trustful cultivars of Saxifraga the section Porphyrion.

The only mistake was that Ron from some important reason ended his function for AGS and so all the outcrop, which was supposed to be patiently finished with sand stone flakes hammered into crevices was quickly covered with round unsuitable chicken grit. I have only two photographs taken after one year after finishing and one with Saxifraga ´Southside Seedling´ from Ron Beeston. One Dane visited Pershore in a cooking summer weather and he told me that all garden plants were looking tired and wilted but the residents of crevices were looking fresh. What a relief !
ZZ

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43968
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2009, 11:29:31 PM »
ZZ, I know of Ron's regret that he was not able to complete that project as planned ....such a shame that the finish was not done to the original intention... at least the plants are alive!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

mark smyth

  • Hopeless Galanthophile
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15255
  • Country: gb
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2009, 11:34:34 PM »
ZZ the Phlox in my trough is named by you but I have forgotten the name. What is it?
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Stone Rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 98
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #25 on: December 13, 2009, 12:13:10 AM »
Great thread. Good to see these pictures.

May I be so bold as to make a minor (technical) correction to the last post (and apologies if this may seem pedantic.....). In the superb picture of folded limestone beds from the Maritimes - this should read "anticline" instead of "syncline". Anticlines have beds inclined away from the crest of the fold, whereas in synclines the beds dip towards the axis.    :D :D :D

Also, a point of note for British readers: the rock name "diabase" is not often used here where the equivalent term is "dolerite".
Dear Doctor Rock, you have the right diagnosis: it is the anticline. I made cardinal mistake to put the term from my old heart (or head?)  Thanks a lot Zdenek
ZZ

Stone Rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 98
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #26 on: December 13, 2009, 05:28:15 AM »
ZZ the Phlox in my trough is named by you but I have forgotten the name. What is it?
Mark, I made only one Phlox cultivar with shiny red colour and named it ´Karkulka´. ZZ
ZZ

gote

  • still going down the garden path...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1594
  • A fact is a fact - even if it is an unusual fact
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #27 on: December 13, 2009, 09:57:15 AM »
With all respect for the efforts. May I make two (unkind?) comments??

#A: Will those still alive around 2025 say "Look at this camp period piece from 2008-2012 with all rocks standing up" ?  ;D

#B: It is possible to make plants grow in horizontal crevices as well.   ;)

The first picture is from around 1970 the second 1959. The rock is orthoceratitic limestone. Unfortunately my long spells abroad obliterated the plantings - maybe I will be able to redo them.

Cheers
Göte
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

shelagh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1705
  • Country: england
  • Black Pudding Girl
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #28 on: December 13, 2009, 11:29:12 AM »
I love the term recumbent.  My dear old Dad after a Sunday morning up the allotment would often assume a recumbent or somnolent posture on a Sunday afternoon.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

Stone Rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 98
Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #29 on: December 13, 2009, 01:59:20 PM »
THE DOLOMITES
Doctor Rock was very polite to my error with the anticline (the syncline is precisely upside down) and I would like to be the same to young boy Mark Smyth and to explain him a few fine rules of rockwork.  We never try to imitate dramatically dissected (weathered) mountain ridges for two reasons: it does not help to our cultivation of alpines and in small scale of a trough or a small garden it looks unnatural. In the garden and in the trough we construct small outcrop with layers appearing naturally above terrain and then they must naturally disappear into underground (this is called natural return of layers). We feel imaginative arc above the highest layers of the outcrop and no rock has permit to protrude through the arc because it will be against natural weathering of the rock formation. Smooth gentle surface of the outcrop (or a head) is always elegant! Mark, I like your rock under Hypericum much more than your mini-tre-cime. I illustrate the idea with one mountain picture and ask you not to copy the back ridge but the shape of the front part.
ZZ

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal