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Author Topic: Hepatica culture questions  (Read 4285 times)

Regelian

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Hepatica culture questions
« on: March 22, 2009, 05:53:15 PM »
Being quite thrilled with my Hepatica aquisitions, I want to offer them the best possible culture.  I have a few questions.

Does one tend to clay or plasic pots....or is this a matter of watering schedules?

What soil would be the best?  I suspect a peat-based potting mix with some pumice or coarse sand would be good, plus a bit of time-release fertilizer. 

Are they better in the garden than pots?  We are not talking expensive cultivars, rather good seedlings.

When is the best time to transplant-divide, etc.?

While on potting mixes, can someone explain what is actually in the John Innes mixes?   ;D
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

Maggi Young

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2009, 07:42:17 PM »
From the RHS definition : "John Innes Compost: Soil-based seed and potting composts made to specific formulae developed by the John Innes Horticultural Institute in the 1930’s. They contain loam, sand, peat (or peat substitute), ground chalk, and varying amounts of added fertilisers, according to their purpose. J I Seed Compost contains some added superphosphate; J I Nos 1-3 contain the ‘JI base mix’ of fertilisers (i.e. hoof and horn meal, superphosphate and potassium sulphate), in increasing quantities. J I No 1 contains the least base mix (suitable for temporary bedding plants), J I No 2 contains more base mix (for pot plants preferring poorer soils), and J I No 3 contains the most base mix (for vigorous pot plants with heavy feeding requirements, and for long-term pot plants). There are also ericaceous versions for acid-loving plants. As loam is currently in short supply, not all brands actually follow the original formulae."


 I suggest this site is useful: http://www.jic.ac.uk/corporate/media-and-public/compost.htm
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Regelian

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2009, 09:38:46 PM »
Maggi,

you are a jewel!  Thanks,
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

Jim McKenney

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2009, 10:49:27 PM »
Hi, Jamie, good to see you on this forum - and to have a picture to attach to the name.
Jim McKenney
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Regelian

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2009, 08:43:03 AM »
Hey, Jim,  didn't know you were here!   8)

Likewise with the foto and I won't make a silly comment on who's who!  (but I did, didnt I)  Is he a Lhasa?
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

gote

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2009, 02:09:53 PM »
Hi Jamie,
Since you are in Cologne and hepaticas grow wild in Germany I would think that they actually grow better in the garden. That is provided they are H nobilis v nobilis or the Hungarian one H. transsylvanica.
the east Asians may be more tricky. They grow best in a sandy soil that is not too infertile and which contains some organic matter but please do not overdo it. You look for soil of the type you find on the forest floor. It is a misconception that the NEED lime in the soil they survive well also in a more acid environment. In nature you often find them in fairly dark places. This is not because they need shade but because the competition is less in the shade. You can grow them in fairly light situations in the garden but perhaps not where you would have sempervivums.  ;)
I am afraid that you will need to get advice on pot culture from someone else.
Göte
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

Jim McKenney

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2009, 02:39:36 PM »

Likewise with the foto and I won't make a silly comment on who's who!  (but I did, didnt I)  Is he a Lhasa?

"He" is a she, and she's a five-year-old ShihTzu. Here she is before her spring trim and after: hard to believe that she is the same doggie.
Jim McKenney
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Regelian

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2009, 03:28:28 PM »
Thanks, Göte,

I have slightly limey soil, typical for this side of the Rhein and the one Hepatica I've had over the years is still there, but just not overly robust.  Always flowers nicely.  I get the feeling it is fine, but really wants something else.  It may be a touch too dry, as it is under a fir tree.  As I am re-doing a corner of the garden, adding an Acer forrestii for protection and am planning short bulbs, Corydalis and Cyclamen, the Hepaticas may feel quite a home.

Surely, one simply has to try it out, but I prefer not to make ridiculous mistakes when there are so many knowledgable gardeners that can avdvise me along.

Jim,

Ah-ha!  ShihTzu, that would have been my second guess. Don't tell her I mistook her for a macho!  Couln't see the naughty bits in a foto.  The second picture sure brings back memories.  I gifted my Mum a Lhasa Apso some years back and we did the Summer Shave for her as well.  They really start to look like miniature lions.  I'm hoping to bring home a standard poodle some day, but I am waiting until I have more free time.  I really miss having a dog about.
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

gote

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Re: Hepatica culture questions
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2009, 04:45:38 PM »
Jim,
I think that this is the right thing to do. My own grow better under broadleaves than under firs. Probably because there is less light coming through in the spring but perhaps also because firs lower the pH somewhat.
Göte
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

 


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