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Author Topic: April in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 2891 times)

ruweiss

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #60 on: April 23, 2022, 08:13:13 PM »
Thanks to all of you for showing us all these  beautiful pictures.
Spring is on the way everywhere.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

shelagh

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #61 on: April 24, 2022, 10:09:19 AM »
Thanks for the correction Andre. We bought it years ago at the Glasgow Show with the name we use.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

Robert

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #62 on: April 24, 2022, 06:35:14 PM »
Akke,

The inflorescence of Penstemon laetus is generally ascending. The decumbent inflorescence is the result of the resent rainfall. Last year the plant got tangled in a mass of vetch, which impacted its growth. This this did not help. Penstemon rydbergii var. oreocharis will be blooming soon. This species grows well both in containers and our loamy garden. I have much to do to prepare for summer. The spring flower show is easy. A succession of flowers early summer into the autumn is challenging in our climate. There are some species that work well for us, however I admit that I am not satisfied with our summer selection at this time. There is plenty for me to ponder.

Mariette,

Many low elevation California native annual plant species germinate and start growth with the first precipitation in the autumn. Temperatures are generally cool, day length is declining, and the soil is cooling and generally stays moist. Many Diplacus and Erythranthe species fit into this germination – growth scheme. Seeds of many annual species will not germinate with warm temperatures. My experience with the cultivation of California native annuals is that many grow and develop poorly if they are started too late in the “season”. Late September to late October sowing brings the best results with many of our annual species. Those that live where winters are extremely cold face the dilemma of attempting to protect seedlings from extremely cold weather during the winter, or timing their planting in the spring – before temperatures warm too much and day length becomes an issue.  Think about how many onion varieties are day length sensitive to bulb formation. Many of our California native annual species are responding to day length and temperature. The good news is that there are both Diplacus and Erythranthe species that grow in the Sierra Nevada Mountains where snow cover during the winter can be intermittent or consistent. These species respond well to spring sowing. Another factor is, some Diplacus and Erythranthe species are perennial. Some grow at high elevations where snow and cold weather are typical features of the weather. This is good news if one lives in a cold winter climate (not extreme cold).

It seems like you have much to experiment with. I will be keenly interested in your results. You might find Diplacus and Erythranthe seed for sale via Seedhunt. They have a website, however I will no idea if they ship overseas. In addition, Annie’s Annuals at one time sold via mail order and had a listing of California native annuals. Once again, I have no idea if they are still in business, ship over seas, or even offer seed. They are perhaps places to start an inquiry. Your gardening plans sound exciting!
« Last Edit: April 24, 2022, 06:37:12 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
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If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Akke

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #63 on: April 24, 2022, 09:31:26 PM »
Lots of  great pictures.

Nik

Your side yard looks lovely, lawn mower treatment doesn’t seem to hurt them, I’m not an expert on Viola (or anything else), just cheated to find out about the ones growing in the pavement.
Your japenese maple and seedlings are very attractive, do they require any special treatment to germinate?

Mariëtte

Thanks, adding the really lovely plants and combinations of them like you and others show, to what’s around here is relaxing, no need for speed, just enjoyment and slow progression. Love your Anemone.

Shelagh

Love your garden view and plants, thanks. By coincedence I found some more pictures of your garden in summer still looking great.

Robert

Just read your interesting post.
Neighbour and I had a short talk about summer flowering species around here this morning, it might not be just my impression that they’re not easy to find locally. I hope you got some serious rain.





Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Nik

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #64 on: April 25, 2022, 09:26:48 AM »
Akke,

Japanese maples need cold stratification to germinate. I just leave the pots outside during the winter. Other than that nothing special. I use soil from the yard. It seems to work perfectly fine.
Connecticut, zone 7a

Anders

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #65 on: April 25, 2022, 06:20:12 PM »
My favourite prostrate willow because of the light pink flowers. A cutting from the Narsaq area, Southern Greenland, probably Salix arctica.

Graham Catlow

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #66 on: April 25, 2022, 06:35:05 PM »
Some images from my garden as the Acers and Rhododendrons begin to put on their Spring show.











Bo'ness. Scotland

Graham Catlow

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #67 on: April 25, 2022, 06:39:55 PM »
Some more…











Bo'ness. Scotland

Graham Catlow

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #68 on: April 25, 2022, 06:45:24 PM »
And finally…

Rhododendron Everred which is flowering at its best since I bought it many years ago. Glendoick advertise it as ‘rarely flowers’



Sanguinaria  canadensis


Bo'ness. Scotland

Maggi Young

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #69 on: April 25, 2022, 09:40:19 PM »
You're further ahead than us, Graham - our Acer leaves just beginning. Your garden is looking lovely!

Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Graham Catlow

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #70 on: April 26, 2022, 03:35:40 PM »
Thanks Maggi. Probably a bit warmer down here.
Bo'ness. Scotland

Mariette

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #71 on: April 27, 2022, 07:09:21 AM »
Yes, Your garden looks lovely, Graham - and is well - matched by the scenic grey stone-house in the background!

Robert, thank You for Your enlighting explanations! Eschscholzia californica is a well-known Californican over here, which self-seeded for many years in my allotment, usually starting in autumn and surviving our increasingly mild winters. Lesson learnt, I´ll try to sow plants like this in autumn, if possible. Unfortunately, the seed received from an American organisation arrived in late winter.

Calochortus is a species I always admired, but trying some bulbs in the driest spot of my garden they never turned up, though Sternbergia lutea copes with the conditions there. As I noticed that You grow them in tubs I wondered if they wouldn´t do well in the open ground?

A Trillium erectum seedling with Disporum megalanthum starting to sprout on the left.



Brunnera ´Diane´s Gold´with a double Anemone ranunculoides.



A bracteate Hyacinthoides non-scripta of filigree charm.



Trillium kurabayashii with Epimedium franchetii ´Brimstone Butterfly´.


Andre Schuiteman

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #72 on: April 27, 2022, 05:26:30 PM »
Daphne cneorum 'Benaco'. Floriferous and fragrant and easy to propagate from cuttings. Why is it so rarely offered in the trade?

Stefan B.

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #73 on: April 27, 2022, 07:27:06 PM »









That is the mood in my garden today.

Akke

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #74 on: April 28, 2022, 09:26:36 PM »
Stefan

Looks like a good mood, how did you get your wildlife to pose? 😀 A good moment to add that your blue above yellow is really good.

Nik

Thanks for the info, really late I picked up some (probably) japanese maple seeds prestratified in the park and for cross-reference some other maples. The last ones sprouted, none of the japanese maples did so far, I’ll leave them and keep an eye on possible seedlings (I assume grabbing is no problem if they’re going to be mown or weeded anyway) at the park. Very interesting to see that young seedlings already show variations.

Although planted inofficially, Acer palmatum is fitting in very well here, in my opinion.
Graham, your A. palmatum got a lot of my attention, combined with the other plants your garden already looks great.

Mariëtte & Robert

I’ll keep an eye on your experiments Mariëtte, your climate seems much like mine.
Maybe it would be interesting to sow a few ‘Californians’ ,  Nemophila and Limnanthes, in autumn, what do you think Robert?


Park season is starting the final show, a huge number of Allium ursinum beginning to flower, a bit less of Hyacinthoides too, in my containers things are slowing down.
704256-1
Narcissus wilkommii is finishing while Allium ‘chameleon’ is colouring up to it’s name, ‘Botanical’ dutch Tulipa in the background, maybe not collectables but very enjoyable.

Anders

I love Salix arctica.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

 


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