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Author Topic: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 3793 times)

Akke

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: March 07, 2022, 05:45:35 PM »
Leucogenes


With Callianthemum farreri I especially like the time when the flowers are not yet fully open. Then you can see the majestic blue colouring particularly well... like in this photo from the past.


Beautiful picture of a lovely plant.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2022, 09:21:25 PM »
Major changes are taking place in the atmospheric pattern of the Northern Hemisphere. I am hoping that this translates into precipitation for our part of California. So far nothing looks promising in the 7-day forecast, however there are plenty of hints that our weather could shift to a wet pattern during the 8 to 14 day forecast period. [This would be welcome for us, and for the parts of Australia that receive flooding rains when we experience drought.]

Currently, our weather is still spring-like, with dramatic shifts in the temperature from day to day. Sunday morning there was patchy frost in our neighborhood. Now, Monday, there is a cold, dry north wind. Currently, the sky is increasingly filled with mid-level milky clouds. The forecast is for the weather to turn warm tomorrow and the next day with above-average temperatures before the next cold, dry windstorm arrives.

This coming week will be extremely busy: I will be making my first survey and assessment of the Caldor Fire burn area. The site I will visit--if possible--is prime habitat for species such as Viola lobata, and V. sheltonii. Also, I am keenly interested in the status of species such as Erythranthe bicolor, E. guttata, and Diplacus kelloggii.

Other sites I wish to visit--outside the Caldor Fire burn area--are the various vernal seeps situated on the Mehrten Formation geologic feature in the Transition Life Zone. As alluded to in my pervious posting, these vernally moist ecosystems have been severely impacted by the chronically dry conditions during the last 20 plus years.

In our Sacramento garden, the parade of spring flowers continues.



The flowers of Dipterostemon capitatus ssp. capitatus ‘Skunk Hollow White’ are now open. I have other “white” selections of this species. When the flowers of these other forms open I hope to post a few photographs. The “muddy” white color caused by traces of blue pigmentation in the petals will hopefully be apparent.



The early forms of Dipterostemon capitatus ssp. capitatus with their typically colored lavender-blue flowers are beginning to open.



The first flowers of Allium falcifolium are now opening. This is another common California native species.



The flowers of Narcissus jonquilla are very fragrant.



I grew this Narcissus from a set of open-pollinated seed labeled Narcissus hispanicus ssp. perez-chiscanoi. I have a very difficult time finding detailed information on this species to confirm its identity. This is the first time these plants have bloomed, and I am pleased regardless of their true identity.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2022, 09:23:04 PM »


The flowers on our containerized Western Redbud, Cercis occidentalis, are beginning to bloom.



One of three remaining elepidote Rhododendrons in our garden. This one is a cross of Rhododendron degronianum ssp. yakushimanum ‘Dwarf Form’ x ririei.
This Rhododendron has done surprisingly well in our garden despite our long, hot summer weather, less than ideal water quality and soil pH, and the air pollution every summer from severe wildfires.


Nik,

I enjoyed immensely the photograph of the huge rock near your garden. It appears that your site was glaciated during the last Ice Age?

[Jasmin]:  I thought the wet benches were part of the artistic composition!  There is nothing to apologize for!  As Thomas says, Nature has been a fabulous garden decorator in your area.

[Rudi,

All your plants are lovely!  I also enjoy the gorgeous Alpine House Primulas you posted in the Primula section.
[Rudi, Thomas,

Even though our climate in central, interior California does not allow us to grow the beauties you post and describe, we enjoy learning about them, your climate and growing conditions.  My life with my Viennese relatives was predominantly in Vienna, with some visits to other places in Austria on occasion.  Strangely, I really am not—and never was--an adventurer.  Travel always made me anxious: perhaps it was the travel sickness I suffered as a child, and later, rushing for connections for trains and planes made me nervous.  I never liked travelling alone, or going where I did not know anyone.  It really is amazing I went anywhere at all!  As a child, I may have learned to walk on a plane or train; yet I know I missed a lot, even as I savored much:  It takes living in a place to get to know it.  It is a vicarious pleasure, to enjoy these plants through your efforts.]

[Robert again]:

Akke,

I am always fascinated with your container gardens. I am keenly interested in how they will transform and progress when the bulbs are finished and the summer season arrives. Summer in interior California is in some ways like winter in cold snowy climates: the end of the growing season, and there are no actively growing plants. In the hot, dry interior of California many native species are dormant during the summer-early autumn season. Summer has always been a challenging gardening season for me, with few drought-tolerant, summer- blooming annual species to choose from. There are some, but the situation is still challenging.

[Jasmin]:  My favorite rock is the smaller one that I can move to where I would like to enjoy it next.  The larger rock is sunken into the ground a little.  Robert has done that with a number of the rocks, so they do not shift about when we water.  Although the hose can still catch on them, they do not end up accidentally crushing plants.  While this is a good thing, it is sometimes sad I can no longer easily lift one to change the face that shows, or change its location.

The Cornus mas and apple trees, and the composition of colors in your container are very nice.

Life, Nature, and everyone’s gardens hold so much wonder, beauty, and the miracles of Being.  It all touches me deeply, and I am grateful to everyone for sharing.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

ruweiss

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: March 08, 2022, 08:17:05 PM »
Akke, Thomas and Robert, thank you for the friendly comments, your reports and all the fine pictures.
It is always interesting for me to read about the conditions for gardening in other regions and countries.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Akke

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: March 09, 2022, 10:55:18 PM »
Rudi

Thanks and likewise.

Robert

Short summary of a news article on the KNMI, since 1901 (starting of systematic and recorded measurements) growing season, with an allday average of at least 5C, has been starting earlier, 5th now vs 26th of april 1901 , while late frost has occured later this century, increasing possible damage to crops. They also write that they can’t explain the latter (yet) and that at this moment they don’t know if it’s natural or related to climate change. Current weather is more cold-ish at night and mild, sunny days, as more of this is forecasted some watering might even be necessary.
Over here we've had a sneak preview of dry summers, I can only suspect that these were wet compared to yours.
These Tulipa, dutch polychroma and humilis ‘violacea black base’ , opened with the higher temperature.



Your pictures and plants are lovely, thanks for sharing this variety in flowering genus/species early in this season. Same time the summer dormancy you talk about doesn’t sound very attractive, maybe our temperate climate zone deserves a little more apreciation. Your Cercis occidentalis has inspired us, independently my neighbour and I thought of trying a few other trees in a container, and will remain special.
Places to find flowering bulbs are widespread though, like the marketplace.
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Bees found it as well, lots of buzzing.

It’s not always necessary to travel far to discover.

Seedlings in the roots of Carpinus betulus, visible if you walk around it, instead of staying on the path. I like the species and these (another one stands next to it) belong to my favourites in the park.

Jasmin

While travelling can be a good way to learn, discover and study, for many years I’ve wondered if we’re still doing this in our own surroundings.

I wish you rain and good luck on your expeditions, it doesn’t sound promising though.

« Last Edit: March 09, 2022, 10:59:10 PM by Akke »
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: March 12, 2022, 07:31:34 PM »
I had a very successful trip to the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Our weather has remained dry, and windy at times, although change appears to be arriving: Much needed rain is again in the forecast for our region. There has been no measurable precipitation at our Sacramento home for over 60 days. On average 40% of our yearly precipitation would have fallen during this time period. Precipitation, if it arrives, will be extremely welcome.

In the mean time, our garden is coming into bloom and active growth.



The early blooming forms of Triteleia laxa from seed gathered in Colusa County, California are now coming into flower.



I am growing Eschscholzia lobbii in containers this season. The seed increase this season will allow me to plant large numbers in the open garden next year.



Well-established clumps of Iris macrosiphon are in bloom. I have a strong preference for our local wild species than the hybrid Pacific Coast Iris.



The first of the deciduous azaleas are blooming. The early blooming form of our California native Rhododendron occidentale is always the first deciduous azalea to bloom in our garden.



I discovered these early blooming forms of Rhododendron occidentale in the Feather River canyon back in the 1980’s. They grow on serpentine rock on the steep south facing canyon slope. Summertime temperatures can be extreme, often reaching 110 F (43.3 C) or more. I made several selections from this site. All of them thrive in our Sacramento garden and bloom two months before other forms of Rhododendron occidentale from the Sierra Nevada Mountains bloom.

Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: March 12, 2022, 07:35:08 PM »


This color range is very typical for Iris macrosiphon in our region. I have other color forms of this species from other parts of northern California that range in color from white to deep violet.



The first flowers of Lupinus succulentus are beginning to emerge. We have these growing in a large tub amidst our vegetable beds this year.



I received seed of Viburnum bitchiuense from Korea back in the 1980’s. I managed to save a number of plants of this gem-of-a-species. The flowers are very fragrant. If more than one clone is grown, beautiful bright red fruit form in the autumn. In addition, this species has exceptional autumn leaf colors.



The Japanese Maples continue in active growth. This is the new growth of Acer palmatum ‘Peaches and Cream’.



I also managed to save at least one plant of Moraea aristata. This plant might be a hybrid; however it is very close to the true species in appearance.

Akke,

I very much enjoyed your last posting. I grow Tulipa humilis in our Sacramento garden; however our plants look very different from the one pictured in your last posting. I bought our Tulipa humilis bulbs locally. Huh… Bulbs sold locally in our area are frequently mislabeled, so I am not sure what we truly have in our garden. I like Tulips; however the selection of bulbs in our area is extremely limited. My solution is to breed my own based on the limited number available in our area. Some are sterile or have chromosome non-homogenies. This limits the possibilities further. Despite the challenges and limitations, I am enjoying this project.

[Jasmin]:  Now that Robert is home from his outing, pictures of the garden could be taken.  So much has been coming into bloom or leaf with the heat.  The wind of the last two days has been hard, desiccating for the plants and hard for the respiratory system of the birds and myself:  One of our canaries lost its voice for the interim.  The birds were also restless, not sleeping well at night with the gale, which means I did not sleep well either.  Dariya has been so restless, she is off the nest, but seems confused about what to do.  I imagine the wild birds and wildlife are similarly unsettled during these weather events.  I am grateful everyone is sharing their garden and local climate, both the beauty and the challenges.
     Yes, Akke, we are indeed traveling in other ways now.  I am so thankful you understood my heart.  Our continued dialogs have me continue on an inner journey to very deep levels, for which I am very grateful.
     I loved the image from the marketplace, and the inclusion of the sound of the bees.  When Robert and I had the farm and nursery, we also sold at our local open-air market.  Although we have no desire to return to this work, having cleaned up and closed those endeavors; yet, there are fond memories from those decades.  In fact, it was the marketplace that brought us together:  I was working for one farm which allowed me to have a little side production of my own, and Robert for himself. There may not have been bees, but our love was nurtured in the place.  I also remember how fond I was of open-air markets in other places and countries I visited or lived in.  Very good, wonderful and joyous experiences of full living:  It is rewarding to re-examine my life, and gain deeper appreciation for life, and other perspectives on the many experiences.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: March 14, 2022, 04:48:24 PM »
Today, 14 March, it has been 66 days without measurable precipitation in Sacramento, California. The good news is that today is likely to be the last day added to this rainy season record – for the number of days without measurable precipitation during the rainy season. Rain is forecasted for our area tonight!

The weather has been warm and our garden is in active growth. Today I will share a few photographs of some of the Japanese Maples, Acer palmatum, in our Sacramento, California garden. They all received pruning this winter. The containerized maples were also repotted with fresh soil and received root pruning. They are all looking great this spring.



Acer palmatum ‘Shigitatsu sawa’ – bright yellow new foliage.



Acer palmatum ‘Kasagiyama’ – brick red new foliage.



Acer palmatum ‘Mirte’.



Acer palmatum ‘Filigree Lace’.



Acer palmatum ‘Ornatum’

I have many more photographs to share of blooming plants from our Sacramento, California garden, however today Jasmin and I will be going to Placerville, California.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2022, 04:50:22 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

ruweiss

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: March 14, 2022, 08:11:02 PM »
Robert,
thank you for your posts, you must have a nice collection of Japanese Maples.
I also love these phantastic plants, but the leaves often get burned in summer
by the agressive sun and shady places are rare in our garden.
Love the Viburnum bitchiunense and see it for the first time. Is it hardy and how
high will it grow?
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Akke

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: March 14, 2022, 09:21:08 PM »
Robert

I hope you finally get rain.
Thanks for the pictures, so many jewels.
Starting with the more familiair ones, I wouldn’t mind Iris macrosyphon being native here, Triteleia laxa sold here, is much more intense in colour (and flowering later), yours are more beautiful.
Tulipa Humilis vbb is a dutch garden clone, I like the colours and in my small tulip collection it’s the first to show up. Tulipa humilis garden clone is much paler, attractive as well and not flowering yet.

Picture taken 17th of February

Not very familiair with Moraea, but Paul shared lots of beautiful pictures in the Iris section, M. Aristata is one of the best, for now or forever shared in a vicarious way.
The Rhododendron you show are lovely, species or hybrids planted in the park seem easy to maintain and disguising the rubbish (still smelled by Spot), I like yours. Lupinus, Viburnum and Escholzia are all very attractive, ‘local’ Acer palmatum seeds have been gathered and resown, late but worth a a try.
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I didn’t bother with the elder (Sambucus nigra) as this one probably would have been killed by weeding, and got this specimen for my neighbour as he dotes on them.

Otherwise flowers keep on popping up in less usual places.
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Anemone nemerosa in a ruderal area.
Walking in the park this morning, I found some Scilla Siberica (hiding between big dutch crocus) at least half a mile from Siberica hotspot, halfway there’s just a few, maybe there’s more of them somewhere in between.

Your additional pictures of Acer palmatum are great, they’re all completely different.

Jasmin

I feel sorry for your birds , suffering from the weather, I hope things will get better soon.
There’s definately a shift, but an enjoyable one, in our birds too as spring has started. The common ducks are trying to find a place to breed, so there’s protection on the containers. Alopochen aegyptiaca stopped shouting, they could be breeding already, unfortunately they’re really invasive here, not only being agressive but actually drowning young birds if possible. They made the official local top 5 of invasive species, the other ones are plants.

Our conversations are really meaningful to me as well, maybe the way of travelling might have changed; questions, results and further explorations, seem much more interesting. Container gardening adds to the joy, as there’re so many details to be seen, it’s very likely that things were overlooked before.
 
Have a nice time at Placerville;)
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: March 16, 2022, 02:58:37 AM »
Jasmin and I awoke early Tuesday morning to the sound of a soft rain falling. The rain continued into the morning hours. The precipitation exceeded the forecasted totals. It was a joy to have rain. More rain is in the forecast.  May it be so.

Rudi and Akke –

Thank you for the kind comments. Our Sacramento garden is such a pleasure now that I am free to be fully active in the garden. Jasmin and I enjoy strolling through our garden, being amazed at the transformation that is taking place.

Rudi

Thank you for your contributions to the forum. I never would have known about or considered Ranunculus calandrinioides as a species for our garden without your input to the forum. This is only “the tip of the iceberg.”

Viburnum bitchiuense to my knowledge is native to Korea, and is likely very cold hardy. The plants I grew in the ground become 1.3 meters tall. The soil was poor and dry, so with better growing conditions they likely would have grown much taller. The plants at the Placerville property are dead now due to extreme drought and the inability to keep them irrigated.

[Jasmin]:  We are curious that you have trouble with the Japanese Maples since your climate is comparatively cooler than here—I certainly never remember any 40° C in Vienna, Austria, and I cannot imagine Germany being hotter!  Is it the ability to water the trees during hot, dry weather?  We have heard there has been unusual drought and heat everywhere, a phenomenon that is no longer unique to our area of California or central Australia, although perhaps not as extreme.

Akke,

You bring up many excellent plant-related topics worthy of discussion in more detail on the forum. I know very little about the Genus Moraea. Many do well for us. A few are weedy. The details for each species are now being explored. Many seem to have the potential for expanded application in our garden. For us, time and experimentation will reveal some of these potentials.

More blooming plants in our garden:



The Kanaka Valley forms of Erythronium multiscapideum are now in bloom. These consistently bloom much later than our other forms of this species.



This is a nice close up of the Kanaka Valley form of Erythronium multiscapideum.



Erythronium oregonum is also in bloom.



This is a close up of a flower of Erythronium oregonum.



We have a number of different forms of Dipterostemon capitatus ssp. capitatus from various regions of California. This species seems under utilized as a garden plant in our part of California. In addition, the species likely has a great deal of unexplored potential.

[Jasmin]:  Our journey to Placerville will become a topic soon.  At the location I saw all the repair work Robert and his brother have been doing.  We also gathered some rocks for inclusion in the garden here.  We brought all the birds for the ride.  They adore car rides.  If it were up to them, we would live forever flying from one forage place to another.  Little do they understand what it entails, all the planning, cleaning, and so forth!  They are all spoiled tyrants!
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Akke

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2022, 09:06:23 PM »
Jasmin

Do you take the birds and their nests? Sounds like quite an enterprise! Spot loves cars so much, she tries to jump in if possible, sometimes this is a bit awkward as it surely doesn’t belong to me, I don’t own one. She seems comfortable on the back of the bike, while she sabotages running next to it, talking about a spoiled brat.

Good to hear you finally got rain, we had some the other day and people were pleased, I can’t imagine your situation.

Todays sunset was unfortunately cloudy, it could have been very colourful as there’s desert dust in the air.

Robert

Thanks, but inspiration concerning Moraea should be on Paulflowers account, he kindly shared so many beautiful pictures, I just enjoyed and had a look at the pacific bulb society site. And then decided I could have another look much later, some people inspired me to fully enjoy, that means not being in a hurry for me. 😃

Your Erythronium look lovely, It looks like my first try at the genus isn’t going to work, it took a very long time before it arrived as our mail ‘service’ messed up.
Dipterostemon capitatus ssp capitatus and your attitude towards these kind of plants, is inspiring to me, maybe common but worthy. Neighbour and I share this thought, although in our case flowers do seem to be much smaller.

Veronica (?), very small and very difficult to get the details on picture. Noticeable because there’ll be lots of flowers soon.

Gagea Lutea in general is not overlooked, just by local authorities.
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Indigineous or introduced, I hope they get a chance this season, the yellow could be much more intense. More Crocuses in the background and some Chionodoxa.

Primula vulgaris flowering now in the old hortus garden is not being treated kindly, some shrub has recently been planted next/through it (small leaves left/under corner).
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In fact, colour is just a bit more yellow, guess there was too much sunlight already.

The containers are filling up, the temperatures are more normal so the speed seemed to have slowed. Carpets of Corydalis cava are starting to form in the park, I’m waiting, hoping to make some good pictures.

Container  gardening, using lots of bulbs, might have inspired another neighbour, it’s nice to know more people are enjoying my plants and sharing them this way.

« Last Edit: March 16, 2022, 09:15:14 PM by Akke »
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Akke

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #42 on: March 17, 2022, 04:49:06 PM »
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A panoramic view, app. 180 degrees, of Corydalis cava in the park.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2022, 09:26:18 PM »
Akke,

In our garden, the cultivation of Moraea is a slow evolutionary process. It is clear that many species adapt well to our Sacramento, California climate. I have successfully grown Moraea polystachya for a number of years. My original plants grew very spindly and flopped all over the place when in bloom. I tried growing them among other plants to help support their lanky growth. I also grew more from seed from my established population of plants. This year one of my seedlings bloomed for the first time. This plant has the usual blooming pattern, but is a very stout strong-stemmed plant. It needs no support when in bloom. For me, this is a major step forward with this species; however it took 5 years to make this leap in progress.



Moraea elegans also does well in our garden. Unlike Moraea polystachya, Moraea elegans is not tolerant of summer moisture when dormant. This bicolored form is my only remaining plant of this species. At one time I had forms that were all yellow. Progress with this species is at a halt until I receive more seed.



As I grow more seedlings of other Moraea species I will experiment with their tolerance to summer moisture when dormant in the open garden.

Moraea bipartita (pictured) blooms well for us and seems very easy-to-grow.
[Jasmin]:  I do not mind adding a few more cinder blocks for dry bulbs.  Location is key!



Here Moraea bipartita is growing with Eschscholzia caespitosa. I too have been following the postings of Moraea species by Paul (Flowers). He seems to have quite a collection and is providing an opportunity to learn more about this Genus. Thank you Paul!

I was also intrigued by the conversation between Paul Cumbleton and Maggi Young concerning the planting of Eschscholzia californica cultivars with Moraea species. As you can see from the photograph above, nature has been doing this combination in our garden without any help on my part. The only difference is nature planted Eschscholzia caespitosa rather than E. californica.



This photograph of our cider block garden was taken yesterday. I never plant the Eschscholzia caespitosa in this part of the garden. They are all volunteers that seed themselves every year. Our native Allium species, Dichelostemma species, and Calochortus species grow happily with the Eschscholzia.



I took this photograph of our Eschscholzia lobbii yesterday. They are blooming profusely! The conversation between Paul and Maggi concerning Eschscholzia got me thinking about how to use Eschscholzia lobbii in our garden. I will have a large amount of seed to work with and a highly effective method of deploying them in our garden. Even better is the fact that I have an equal number of Eschschozia lobbii ‘Sundew’ that I planted at a latter date. They will come into bloom after the bulk of the regular lobbii have finished blooming. Maintaining seed purity will be easy and I will have an equally large amount of seed to work with next year with this variety.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #44 on: March 17, 2022, 09:31:10 PM »


Rhododendron hyperythrum is blooming in our garden. This elepidote species grows extremely well in our garden. [Jasmin]:  It is amazing what this plant has endured over the years.  It is one of our truly tough survivors.  Until recently we had a “drought-tolerant” fuschia.  We still have a couple that survived, surprisingly.



Rhododendron degronianum ssp. yakushimanum x ririei is one of three elepidote Rhododendrons that have survived and do well in our garden.



Deciduous Azaleas thrive in our garden. I have always liked deciduous Azaleas and thus we have many in our Sacramento garden. Pictured is Rhododendron austrinum ‘Moonbeam’. The flowers of this variety have a very nice fragrance.  [Jasmin]:  The deciduous azaleas have indeed been the most resilient to all the vagaries of life and Nature thrown our way.  Our hummingbirds and insects enjoy the flowers too.



This is a simple F1 hybrid between Rhododendron flammeum x austrinum.



We grow several clones of Rhododendron flammeum.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

 


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