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Author Topic: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 3796 times)

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2022, 09:37:47 PM »


Akke –

I like Tulips. This is about as good as it gets around here.  [Jasmin]:  I differ:  We have some T. clusiana in the garden, and I am very fond of those. [Robert]: I too like Tulipa clusiana, however T. clusiana is not very genetically compatible with standard Tulipa species and hybrids, thus I tend to breed the two types separately. There might be creative ways to bridge this gap, however I have not experimented with any methods to date. This might be fun and interesting to do in the future.



The tulips pictured are hybrids bought at a local nursery. My breeding efforts with tulips are toward some sort of reverse evolution toward something more species- like. I have very limited genetic possibilities to work with, but I try anyway.



Narcissus rupicola is in full bloom. I marked the single Narcissus triandrus with a chopstick so I can remove it later.



Nemophila maculata is blooming in our open garden.



Nemophila menziesii var. menziesii is also starting to bloom in our open garden.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2022, 09:49:19 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
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Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #46 on: March 17, 2022, 09:52:56 PM »


I am very excited about our Erythranthe bicolor that are now starting to bloom. I struggled through 4 generations of seed until I finally developed a line that thrives in our garden. Seed lines of Diplacus torreyi and Diplacus kelloggii are also progressing.  [Jasmin]:  As seed lines are developed and expanded, tubs of these flowers form excellent displays, as you can see from the pictures of E. lobbii.



I have grown this Potentilla species for about 35 years, but I have never been able to put a name to it.



Gladiolus alatus puts on a great show every year. This pot full will be put into a tub where they can expand and make a very striking display. This species also seems to seed around in our garden. A few have come up here and there in other pots. [Jasmin]:  The cheery color makes this my favorite.  At one time we had a delightful hot pink from some blasé store gladiolus, but the construction crews during remodel did not understand what was under the ground.  Good advice for anyone who remodels, renovates, paints, or repairs their home:  Dig it up before the work begins!  They never destroy on purpose, nor do they destroy the weedy and ugly plants, just the ones you treasure!  The item may not even be near the house, or near the construction!  My apologies to my friends in construction out there, but . . . !



I will end this posting with some photographs of Clarkia amoena Phacelia campanularia. I grew these plants from a package of cheap “California Wildflower” seed purchased at a mass merchandiser.  [Jasmin]:  The white spots of the stamens and nectaries are a delight.



I will keep this Clarkia amoena Phacelia campanularia seed line going. The flowers are large and very striking.

[Jasmin]:  Just this Thursday morning I took a few successful pictures to share at our next opportunity.  Rarely are my pictures better than Robert’s attempt, so this feels like a true success. 

As for the birds, once the girls are bored with brooding and their nests I can think about bringing them on a ride.  None of the eggs is ever fertile (Our male finds the girls too aggressive—women are just too much trouble!  This is actually a good thing, since we are not wanting to breed.  There are already too many birds that are in need of good, quality loving homes.  Just peruse Mickaboo.org to have an idea.), so about day 21 for the last egg is when they are ready for something else.  The other test is how Naomi behaves toward Dariya, my husband, and the other birds.  She is very sweet, except when she is hormonal. At that time she is extremely aggressive.  When she has the start of her nest, and until completion, I am the only one who can tend her.  Even then, despite my self-announcements, she comes charging and attacks until some part of her realizes it is “just” I, providing for her needs.  Once she settles into brooding, we have a regular routine:  she makes the sweetest response sounds when I announce myself, she steps nicely, and is easily returned to the nest.  Upon her return she greets her ‘baby’ eggs with the most precious sounds.  I have been honored to witness the eggs as she “births” them:  The whole process is just as when I helped women deliver babies.  It is truly a moment of awe.  I do not make the hens travel while they are on their nests unless there is a true emergency, such as their health.  This has been extremely rare, and never any egg-binding, for which we are very thankful.  Even without nests, it is a production to bring four cockatiels, three budgies, and two canaries.  The finches also loved rides.  All our birds of the past twelve years have been conditioned to travel.  This is convenient for health checks, for emergency preparedness, for their mental stimulation, and for bonding with us as flock members.  As much as the birds enjoy the aviary and bird room, they are willing to endure the cramped travel cages for the opportunity to experience the thrill of a car ride.  I have had animals I could take in a carrier on walks, on a bicycle, or a baby stroller.  That is fun, since everyone looks for the sleeping baby and finds some birds!

I still like the Primula with the water droplets, even if the color is not accurate.  The panorama with Spot is particularly nice.  She seems to have a very dignified personality, allowing for the exception of car rides!
« Last Edit: March 18, 2022, 12:42:29 AM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Rick R.

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #47 on: March 17, 2022, 10:15:13 PM »
Isn't that Phacelia campanularia?  Love this plant!  Although for me, it's difficult to get it to size up.  It just keeps wanting to blooming at such an early age!
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #48 on: March 18, 2022, 12:40:32 AM »
Hi Rick

Thanks for the name correction. Definitely a James Clerk Maxwell moment for me. I will correct the mistake. Thank you for the heads up on this one.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Mariette

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2022, 07:12:05 PM »
Right now, there are so many plants in flower, one hardly knows where to start taking pics! This is Fritillaria eduardii towering above narcissi.



Primula Barnhaven Blue - Strain with Anemone x lipsisensis.



Two chance seedlings looking nice together: Primula vulgaris and Ficaria verna.



Helleborus and Corydalis solida.



Cardamine quinquefolia with visitor.



« Last Edit: March 21, 2022, 07:19:52 PM by Mariette »

ruweiss

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #50 on: March 21, 2022, 09:18:49 PM »
Yesterday in a forest nearby: Anemone nemorosa, Scilla biflora
and Corydalis solida were in full flower.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #51 on: March 22, 2022, 04:56:28 PM »
Rudi

I liked the photographs from the local forested area. Are they all native wildflowers or are they naturalized?

Mariette

You have some fantastic color combinations in your garden! Thank you for sharing. I always enjoy viewing scenes from your garden.

Rudi and Mariette – Jasmin wants me to relay the message that she enjoyed your postings immensely.


The last frontal system that moved through our region was a bust. Most weather recording stations in our region recorded no measurable precipitation. We were lucky, and received 0.02 inches (0.508 mm) of rain at our Sacramento, California home from a light rain shower. Now record-breaking heat is forecasted for the next two days. Both daily and monthly high temperatures records are likely to be broken.

The recent heat wave in Antarctica and the Arctic is certainly troubling. Temperatures in Antarctica were 70 F (38.8 C) above average and temperatures in the Arctic were 50 F (27.8 C) above average. For anyone interested, check out the University of Wyoming Upper Air Map Page. The 2022-03-18, 12Z Southern Hemisphere map is extremely interesting and certainly tells the story. Equally interesting is the 2022-03-21, 12Z Northern Hemisphere map.



This is an early morning photograph of our garden taken from our “Heart Room”.



This is another photograph taken from our other ‘Heart Room” window. The garden is looking clean and nice, however here is much open space to plant!



We have large specimen of Rhododendron luteum ‘Golden Comet’ in the back corner of our yard.



Golden Comet has a delightful fragrance that fills the back corner of our backyard garden.



I lost the tag to this Zephyranthes species. Generally Zephyranthes blooms in late summer and the autumn in our area.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2022, 01:42:09 AM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #52 on: March 22, 2022, 04:59:21 PM »


In the opposite corner of our backyard the Mount Fuji Cherry, Prunus incisa, is in full bloom. Back in the 1980’s I grew two named varieties of Mount Fuji Cherry. Both trees are gone now and this plant is a cutting from one of the named plants. Unfortunately, I do not remember the names of the cultivars.



The flower petals of Prunus incisa are very delicate and beautiful.



Azalea ‘Angel Lace’ is one of Earl Sommerville’s Deciduous Azalea selections.



Lupinus albifrons var. albifrons is in full bloom now and is putting on a tremendous flowering show.



The first batch of F1 hybrids of Erythranthe guttata is coming into bloom now. Nothing noteworthy has appeared, however they are all beautiful plants when they are blooming. This common California native species blooms profusely in the spring and then sporadically into the summer months.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #53 on: March 22, 2022, 05:02:27 PM »


Tidy Tips, Layia platyglosa, are now coming into bloom.



Primula veris does well in our garden despite our long hot summers.



Salvia Bees Bliss looks nice blooming through a common Wallflower.



I enjoy growing and breeding Sweet Peas, Lathyrus odoratus. I enjoy how the fragrance of the flowers fills the garden.



The late forms of Erythronium multiscapideum are still blooming in our garden.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #54 on: March 22, 2022, 05:04:48 PM »


Erythranthe bicolor is one of my favorite spring annuals.



For me, this sight of Ethiopian Two-row Barley, Hordeum vulgare, is a very beautiful. I even find Barley very beautiful when the ripe grain is dry and ready to harvest.



The last photograph for today is of Tulipa clusiana ‘Peppermint Stick’ with volunteers of Eschscholzia caespitosa.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2022, 01:42:41 AM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Mariette

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #55 on: March 22, 2022, 06:44:46 PM »
Robert, thank You so much for Your kind comment! As my garden isn´t apt for a large range of species, I try to make up by combining those happy here to their advantage.
Winter here has been unusually mild, and the same may be said for March. No frosts yet, and an unusual dry period since the end of February.
Rudi, You´re lucky to live in an area so rich species growing wild! We´ve been to the most northern spot where Scilla bifolia grows wild, the Ennert next to Bonn, but hardly found any variation.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2022, 08:51:53 PM by Mariette »

ian mcdonald

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #56 on: March 22, 2022, 10:22:32 PM »
Lots of colourful plants in the posts. Robert, your photos. of Rhododendron luteum brought memories of a walk along a forest track by Loch Tay. I could smell something with a sweet fragrance wafting through the trees. It took quite a bit a searching until I found the source. A single bush of R. luteum.

Robert

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #57 on: March 23, 2022, 05:14:14 PM »
Ian,

I looked up the natural distribution of Rhododendron luteum in The Encyclopedia of Rhododendron Species. Based on your posting and your Forum Natural History Diary, Rhododendron luteum has naturalized itself well beyond its native habitat. In the U.K. this seems true from many other plant species. For me, the bottom line is that Rhododendron luteum is a highly desirable species in our Sacramento, California garden. The species thrives, has very attractive flowers, the flowers are extremely fragrant, and the foliage turns brilliant colors in the autumn before going dormant for the season. It certainly works for us.

Mariette,

Like you, our Sacramento garden has various constraints, which limit the range of species we can grow. My primary goal with our garden is to create a garden that is beautiful, pleasing, and feels good, at least for Jasmin and I. This is one reason why I enjoy your postings from your garden (and other Forumist too). Your postings certainly feed my creative mind with ideas on how to direct our Sacramento garden.



Camassia leichtlinii ssp. suksdorfii thrives in our Sacramento garden.



Triteleia ixiioides ssp. scabra also thrives in our garden. There are a number of subspecies that commonly grow in our area. They all seem to grow well in our garden.



Rhododendron occidental ‘White Cloud’ is another early blooming selection I made of Rhododendron occidentale. I found this highly variable population in the Feather River Canyon back in the early 1980’s. Like Rhododendron luteum, Rhododendron occidentale is very fragrant. Clearly, I like fragrant plants in our garden.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Maggi Young

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #58 on: March 23, 2022, 06:29:36 PM »
Quote
My primary goal with our garden is to create a garden that is beautiful, pleasing, and feels good, at least for Jasmin and I.
Exactly! If one's own garden cannot be a place of beauty and sanctuary for the owners (possibly also growing some delicious fresh food too), then  what is the point of it ?  :)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

ruweiss

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Re: March 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #59 on: March 23, 2022, 08:38:34 PM »
Mariette,

Thank you for your interesting comment, I did not know, that the distribution
of Corydalis solida is so limited in Germany.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

 


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