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Author Topic: A question for Fritillariphiles  (Read 987 times)

Tristan_He

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A question for Fritillariphiles
« on: January 10, 2021, 04:15:23 PM »
As regular forumists will probably have seen, I bought a fridge in the autumn and used it for the many packets of Fritillaria seed I obtained from the Frit group and one or two other sources. I now have lots of seeds at various stages of germination, from 'showing signs of germination (i.e. you can see a whitish shoot / root pushing through the seed)' through to fully germinated seedlings.

Of course, about two months after sowing the seed I came across Paul Cumbleton's article in the Frit group journal recommending sowing and growing frits in pure Seramis as a means of growing healthier bulbs from seed in less time. I'm thinking that for seed that is just about germinating, it should still be possible to transfer the germinating seed to pure Seramis. Is there any reason (other than perhaps losing a seed or two) why this would be a problem?

Thanks for any thoughts and advice!
Tristan


colin e

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Re: A question for Fritillariphiles
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2021, 10:29:01 AM »
Hi Tristan if you try it with seeds that have only the root showing, very short preferably, it should work if done with care. I can think or two things that you might overlook that could have a negative effect. Firstly I would suggest wetting the Seramis to reduce the risk that the dry granules could suck the moisture out of the new roots and set them back or even kill them. Secondly having damped the Seramis down, put it next to the seed pot and let the temperature even out between the two. This way they should not get a temperature shock and again not be set back. Another potential problem is that Seramis is difficult to make a hole in, as the granules just fall back in, so if the roots are long you may not be able to insert them without damage. Hope this is useful. Best of luck.

Colin
Somerton, Somerset UK zone 8

Catwheazle

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Re: A question for Fritillariphiles
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2021, 04:34:35 PM »
Very interesting topic. Please Tristan post us how it is developing, especially in the summer months (pour)!
I also thought about trying it out like that.

Seramis: I've been cultivating for decades! Paphiopedilum exclusively in Seramis. It has the advantage: no waterlogging, no rot and even moisture, especially in the upper layers. The biggest problem with window sill culture + Paphiopedilum imho.
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

Tristan_He

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Re: A question for Fritillariphiles
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2021, 07:35:14 PM »
That's great Colin, thanksfor your advice. I've moved the pots that were still in the fridge. The most advanced were a couple of pots of F. acmopetala (subsp. acmopetala and wendelboi) that had roots about 10mm long, so these will be the most potentially sensitive. I managed to poke some of them into crevices in the Seramis, others were laid on their side so that they could find their own way.

There are a few other species too but these were all much less advanced.

I may have a go at some more germinated seed tonight / tomorrow.




Tristan_He

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Re: A question for Fritillariphiles
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2021, 05:55:17 PM »
Thought I would update this thread. Most of the pots I moved into Seramis are doing well and seem none the worse.



Fritillaria acmopetala. Although nothing was showing above ground when I moved them, most of this pot had produced quite large roots.



F. olivieri. After coming across the acmopetala I was more careful, scraping away the compost for as far as possible just below the seed layer, then placing this on top of the pot. The scattering of Seramis is to tell me that these have been repotted in this way. These all appeared above ground within the space of a few days.



Some, such as this F. gussichiae, seemed too far advanced to risk repotting.



These F. argolica were a bit bigger again and I thought would be ok, but seem to have suffered from fungal attack - perhaps due to damage / stress when transplanting or maybe they would have had it anyway.

There were also a few 'foundlings' - seeds which dropped out onto the potting bench and which I found germinating later. I have heeled them into the plunge to give them a chance.

680542-4

 


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