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Author Topic: Hepatica Seed  (Read 12689 times)

ali_uk_1

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2009, 08:32:48 PM »
I have some seeds from some Hepatica Nobilis (blue, white and pink flowered plants). Let me know if anyone wants me to send them some.

Maggi Young

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2009, 08:38:14 PM »
Hello, Emma, good to "meet" you  :D
Smart  English bunny you have there, in your avatar, if you'll pardon the expression!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Anastasia

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2009, 10:27:08 AM »
I have returned to you!  :)

And I again search for seeds of various versions Hepatica ;D
Anastasia
Russia.

Kristl Walek

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #18 on: April 29, 2009, 01:53:43 AM »
Ephemeral or not, can Hepatica seed be sown while still green, but fully formed?  In Iris, this tends to speed germination.

Also, is gibberelic acid of use or simply superfluous in this case?

Jamie,
The *ideal* time for collection is when the seed is getting ready to roll off the plant---not always an easy thing to time; unless you want to use various "seed catchers."

Often this is when the seed is going from green to beige. It is possible to collect it greener---but make sure the seed appears well formed (as you noted). It will look very plump (round in the center), and quite firm if you press it. If it is flat, or collapses when you press, it does not have a well-developed embryo.

Even experienced seed collectors can screw up Hepatica---last year I collected a lot of my seed in the wild too early (even though I know exactly when the time is right). The result: the underdeveloped seed rotted in moist packing, although the fully developed seed stayed fine.


GA-3 *is* wasted on Hepatica---this is it's germination habit: if sown fresh (or moist packed and kept at warm), the seed will germinate (radicle emergence only) after about 4 months. The above-ground cotyledons will emerge in spring after cold treatment. GA-3 does not alter this pattern, or speed anything along.

so many species....so little time

Kristl Walek
Gardens North Seed


www.gardensnorth.com

Regelian

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #19 on: April 29, 2009, 08:58:21 AM »
Kristl,

thanks for the full story.  I think I'm going to be fine with the seed I collected, but we'll know in some months for sure.  Part of the learning curve.
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

ali_uk_1

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2009, 06:25:55 PM »
Hello, Emma, good to "meet" you  :D
Smart  English bunny you have there, in your avatar, if you'll pardon the expression!

Thanks for the welcome Maggi, I've been reading the site for ages - but haven't had anything to contribute before!

Anastasia and Stephen - the seeds will be ready to post in about a week (I think).

Diane Clement

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2009, 08:18:40 PM »
I now have hepatica seed available.  Several people have asked for it over the past few months.  Can I ask anyone who is still interested to send me a pm now, with their email address in as I will send the list as an attachment.
It will need sowing immediately and I will include sowing instructions if required.  I have quite a few varieties but some are in short supply, so I will try and deal with all requests fairly.

Diane 
Diane Clement, Wolverhampton, UK
Director, AGS Seed Exchange

Diane Clement

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2009, 12:37:11 PM »
No more requests please for my hepatica seed.  It has now all been posted out, to all corners of the globe.  Hope you all enjoy the results.
Diane Clement, Wolverhampton, UK
Director, AGS Seed Exchange

cohan

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2009, 01:25:12 AM »
hi all,
i have some H seed received not too long ago from Kristl, with instructions that it is best planted in situ, my problem is that i dont have a bed ready! which is why i have dragged my feet on getting them sown... can i sow in pots kept in conditions like where they will be grown? is transplanting out of the question?


edit --scratch the  question below, i realise there are more subcategories in this section than i noticed at first, so i will read on before asking anything else!

btw, just how shady/sunny should the site be?
« Last Edit: August 13, 2009, 01:29:04 AM by cohan »

Paul T

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2009, 02:09:56 AM »
Cohan,

I grow all my Hepaticas in pots, none in the ground.  I don't trust the moisture content in the ground here with the drought at the moment.  Too many things take too much water from other little delicate things.  I've grown Heps from seed to flowering successfully..... I'm now thoroughly hooked.  So I can at least guarantee that in my climate, growing them permanently in pots is not a problem.  From a transplant point-of-view, I've had most success doing it just as they're breaking dormancy after completing at least 2 full seasons in their seed pots (i.e the first year with the pair of cotyledons and the second year when they produce their first true leaves.  When transplanting, be very careful with watering, as they will easily rot until their roots get re-established.  I'm now working on the principle that I water then in after transplanting, then don't again until they have leaves emerging, and then only sparingly.  I'm definitely keeping the transplants on the drier side, to give their roots a chance to establish.

Is any of that useful information? ???
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Lori S.

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #25 on: August 13, 2009, 03:16:23 AM »
I've bought them in pots, so transplanting is certainly not out of the question...  ???  And, if you don't mind me commenting on the other question, I have them in complete shade through to almost full sun... they are not fussy or difficult here.   (My mother grows them in zone 2... tough, hardy plants.)
Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #26 on: August 13, 2009, 07:41:12 AM »
thanks, paul, and lori--

ANY  information is useful information! i did gather that lots of people were growing them in pots after reading some more..certainly i wouldnt longterm, i hate watering!
i need to actually look at the seedlot now and decide if there are enough to warrant trying a couple of different things (some in pots, some straight into the ground)
-- i was thinking a bit more about where i want to plant them: the part of the yard where i had my old rock gardens and i have originally thought about new beds i realised this summer (when it was so dry) is the driest part of the property, being a bit higher..the other end, where i have never gardened, seems much moister--judging at least by grass growth which was almost non-existent at the one end--parts of it i never mowed this year, except to spot mow over big clumps of clover and poplar suckers! its not brown, things just didnt grow much there!
at the other end of the 'yard' there is a clearing with spruce around it that would get some overhead sun in summer, but be rather shady overall, and i think i could quite easily make a bed in there (just a few hours of digging roots ;)

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #27 on: August 13, 2009, 08:21:34 AM »
Cohan,
The main thing with Hep. seed is to sow it as fresh as possible, as soon as ripe. If I got it right, you're talking about this Spring's seed, if so, do try and get it into the ground (pots or ground) asap if it's not already too late...  They won't germinate before next Spring, but that's normal.

Good luck !
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

cohan

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Re: Hepatica Seed
« Reply #28 on: August 13, 2009, 08:49:00 AM »
Cohan,
The main thing with Hep. seed is to sow it as fresh as possible, as soon as ripe. If I got it right, you're talking about this Spring's seed, if so, do try and get it into the ground (pots or ground) asap if it's not already too late...  They won't germinate before next Spring, but that's normal.

Good luck !

thanks, luc, yes, it is this year's seed, but i havent had it since spring, only a couple of weeks ago i received it, (but it is moistpacked) and then i was undecided where to plant them so didnt get them in immediately..lol ..now we need some days without rain so i can go digging!! tomorrow i think is out of the question..

 


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