We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: Different Ericaceae 2017  (Read 4977 times)

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44017
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2017, 03:31:08 PM »
My goodness! I've never seen such a thing. (The green flowered Enkianthus, not John W in a woolly hat - tho' to be honest, I may not have seen that either...)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

ian mcdonald

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2196
  • Country: gb
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2017, 05:23:37 PM »
I see some gardeners are still conned by the 1950s adverts from peat producers, that ericaceous plants need peat. This false statement was made to convince gardeners that peat was good for your garden. This rumour was put in the press because it only takes a few pence to remove a ton of peat. This in turn destroys a whole eco-system, but so what? Perhaps the people who still use peat in their gardens are the same people who destroy limestone pavements so they can build a rockery? Why not destroy ancient woodlands so you can use the leaf mould? The Environment is not your property, it belongs to ALL of us. For your information, ericaceous plants are those that tolerate peat conditions, not those that need them. If you still think you need peat conditions in a garden (I grow heathers and andromeda in ordinary soil) then there are good substitutes. Do not be selfish and think you can destroy OUR environment just as you please. Perhaps selfish people who are not bothered about OUR environment should not be able to continue as a member of a society/club. 60 years on and people are no more intelligent in that time.

johnw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6683
  • Country: 00
  • rhodo-galantho-etc-phile
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2017, 05:48:44 PM »
My goodness! I've never seen such a thing. (The green flowered Enkianthus, not John W in a woolly hat - tho' to be honest, I may not have seen that either...)

I wonder how showy it would be once mature?

john
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44017
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2017, 07:28:13 PM »
 I'm pretty certain John W is mature - so all we need is a pic to see how showy you are in a wolly hat!

Ohh!! You meant the enkianthus?  Well, the flowers are a good size, so I reckon it will make  quite a notable  shrub.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44017
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2017, 07:30:49 PM »
I see some gardeners are still conned by the 1950s adverts from peat producers, that ericaceous plants need peat. This false statement was made to convince gardeners that peat was good for your garden. This rumour was put in the press because it only takes a few pence to remove a ton of peat. This in turn destroys a whole eco-system, but so what? Perhaps the people who still use peat in their gardens are the same people who destroy limestone pavements so they can build a rockery? Why not destroy ancient woodlands so you can use the leaf mould? The Environment is not your property, it belongs to ALL of us. For your information, ericaceous plants are those that tolerate peat conditions, not those that need them. If you still think you need peat conditions in a garden (I grow heathers and andromeda in ordinary soil) then there are good substitutes. Do not be selfish and think you can destroy OUR environment just as you please. Perhaps selfish people who are not bothered about OUR environment should not be able to continue as a member of a society/club. 60 years on and people are no more intelligent in that time.
Some people still believe the earth is flat, Ian - maybe such ideas will always persist. They're not widespread, though, thank goodness!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Martin Sheader

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 45
  • Country: england
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2017, 08:39:57 PM »
Two of the best and little grown ericaceae, hailing from Patagonia, are Gaultheria pumila and Gaultheria caespitosa. G. pumila is usually less than 5cm tall and covers itself in typical white or pink gaultheria flowers, later just as spectacular with white of pink berries.
The second species, G. caespitosa, is flat on the ground, so much so that the typically pendent gaultheria flowers have to be upright if they are to be available to pollinators.
Seed is occasionally available. I must put more effort into growing these beautiful mountain dwarf shrubs. They really are two of the best in the genus.

johnw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6683
  • Country: 00
  • rhodo-galantho-etc-phile
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2017, 10:10:28 PM »
I'm pretty certain John W is mature

Better as the French say - un homme mr.   Ripe that's it, ripe as in a summer fig.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Gabriela

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2248
  • Country: ca
  • Never enough Gentiana...
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2017, 01:12:13 AM »
The seedex Chair for our local Rhodo Chapter & her husband grew Enkianthus campanulatus seed and got this very snazzy green-flowered one.  Has anyone seen such a thing before?  Not I, I have a soft spot for green flowers.
john - +13c @ 10.45; had a tuque on yesterday!   

The surprises of seed growing!
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Gabriela

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2248
  • Country: ca
  • Never enough Gentiana...
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2017, 01:13:54 AM »
Two of the best and little grown ericaceae, hailing from Patagonia, are Gaultheria pumila and Gaultheria caespitosa. G. pumila is usually less than 5cm tall and covers itself in typical white or pink gaultheria flowers, later just as spectacular with white of pink berries.
The second species, G. caespitosa, is flat on the ground, so much so that the typically pendent gaultheria flowers have to be upright if they are to be available to pollinators.
Seed is occasionally available. I must put more effort into growing these beautiful mountain dwarf shrubs. They really are two of the best in the genus.

Both very attractive little plants :) Are these pictures taken in the wild?
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Leucogenes

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Country: de
  • ...keep on rockin in the free world
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2017, 07:31:12 AM »
Two of the best and little grown ericaceae, hailing from Patagonia, are Gaultheria pumila and Gaultheria caespitosa. G. pumila is usually less than 5cm tall and covers itself in typical white or pink gaultheria flowers, later just as spectacular with white of pink berries.
The second species, G. caespitosa, is flat on the ground, so much so that the typically pendent gaultheria flowers have to be upright if they are to be available to pollinators.
Seed is occasionally available. I must put more effort into growing these beautiful mountain dwarf shrubs. They really are two of the best in the genus.


Hello Martin,

Two very beautiful Gaultheria you show here. I especially like this G. caespitosa. I think the photos are from your garden ... or? If this G. caespitosa has enough seeds sometimes, you can think of me. You know my love for native South Americans.

Thomas

Martin Sheader

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 45
  • Country: england
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2017, 08:34:42 AM »
Both gaultherias were photographed in the wild. in southern Patagonia
I have grown both, not very successfully. I will try to acquire some seed.

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 13117
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #26 on: June 17, 2017, 09:47:48 AM »
I see some gardeners are still conned by the 1950s adverts from peat producers, that ericaceous plants need peat. This false statement was made to convince gardeners that peat was good for your garden. This rumour was put in the press because it only takes a few pence to remove a ton of peat. This in turn destroys a whole eco-system, but so what? Perhaps the people who still use peat in their gardens are the same people who destroy limestone pavements so they can build a rockery? Why not destroy ancient woodlands so you can use the leaf mould? The Environment is not your property, it belongs to ALL of us. For your information, ericaceous plants are those that tolerate peat conditions, not those that need them. If you still think you need peat conditions in a garden (I grow heathers and andromeda in ordinary soil) then there are good substitutes. Do not be selfish and think you can destroy OUR environment just as you please. Perhaps selfish people who are not bothered about OUR environment should not be able to continue as a member of a society/club. 60 years on and people are no more intelligent in that time.

As I do with those of many  "eco-warriors" I find your views both limited and limiting. Would you regard a miner as "destroying our environment", maybe you should try that on your soapbox in Barnsley market on a Saturday afternoon?  Similarly would you regard a farmer as an environmental destroyer?  Cows produce milk to feed calves (environmentally sound?) but they eat grass (not environmentally sound?) but they manure grass and therefore a risk of 'wrong' grass growing (not environmentally sound?) Would you buy a bag of composted bark? Would you buy a pint of milk?...............................
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

johnralphcarpenter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2637
  • Country: england
  • Plantaholic
Re: Different Ericaceae 2017
« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2017, 08:01:24 PM »
Easy, tiger!
Ralph Carpenter near Ashford, Kent, UK. USDA Zone 8 (9 in a good year)

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal