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Author Topic: April in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 2468 times)

Mariette

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #45 on: April 21, 2022, 09:26:44 PM »
Thank You, Akke - and sorry: it´s Cardamine bulbifera, not pratensis. The latter grows wild on the other side of the street (I´m living in a very small village). There are some almost white ones among them, but the buds are  tinged lilac. I´d love a pure white one! Cardamine bulbifera is not growing in our area, I´ve got this one from a friend and put it in an enclosed border, hoping that it cannot escape.

Robert

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #46 on: April 22, 2022, 07:10:53 PM »


Our spring garden is coming along well.



This is another view of our “woodland” garden.



Other parts of our garden are coming along, but still need time to get established.



I like Rhododendron occidentale hybrids. Many such as this unnamed hybrid are very fragrant.



I grow Penstemon laetus var. laetus in large containers with very gritty porous soil. I suspect that this species will do well in our average garden soil in the drier parts of our garden. I will experiment with rooted cuttings and new seedlings to see how this works out.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
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Robert

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #47 on: April 22, 2022, 07:13:38 PM »


Many of our California native Allium species can be very effective in our garden. This is Allium falcifolium.



Our California native Allium unifolium is easy to please in our garden.



These Calochortus luteus are growing in a large tub.



A close up view of Calochortus luteus – in various shades of yellow and with a variety of nectary markings.



This is a chance hybrid of Digitalis minor x purpurea that germinated, grew, and is now blooming in our woodland garden.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #48 on: April 22, 2022, 07:15:43 PM »


Mariette,

To answer your question, yes Erythranthe, Diplacus, and Nemophila have self-sown in our garden(s). Diplacus and Erythranthe species do self-seed in our Sacramento garden, but in most cases, not prolifically. This situation may change as our garden matures. I am hoping for more self-sowing. Nemophila and Collinsia self-sowed in the past in our Placerville garden. I just gathered some seed from the wild plants within walking distance of the property and scattered the seed. The Collinsia still grows on the Placerville property without any gardening attention on my part. They are blooming right now.

Pictured above is Collinsia tinctoria blooming, now, in our Sacramento garden. They are starting to self-sow in our garden.

BTY – Your garden and plants looks great! Thank you for sharing.



We have a nice colony of Collinsia heterophylla var. heterophylla growing in our Sacramento garden. This seed line was established from the seed I gathered near our Placerville property.

Akke,

Thank you for sharing the scene of the duckling in the park. Very sweet!  8)
« Last Edit: April 22, 2022, 07:21:17 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Mariette

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #49 on: April 22, 2022, 08:34:14 PM »
Thank You for Your information and wonderful display of mainly American plants, Robert! I´m afraid I´m piling up a long list of American natives to try due to the tempting pictures You show. Collinsia tinctoria looks very attractive, too! I wonder whether these plants were not successful in our climate or are just not known. Some nemophilas and phacelias are available, but I do not know of any source for Eryanthe, for instance.
PS: Both diplacus are on the windowsill, still. D. grandiflorus germinating and growing better, perhaps it can do with lower temperatures?
« Last Edit: April 23, 2022, 10:02:10 AM by Mariette »

Akke

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #50 on: April 22, 2022, 08:56:03 PM »
Mariëtte

Thanks for the correction on Cardamine, it still is beautiful😀.

Robert

Thanks for sharing the lovely views from your garden. Penstemon laetus var. laetus is interesting growing sideways, should it? Seeing the variations in your Calachortus luteus is very pleasing, it might take some time, but the possibilty of variations was one of the main reasons to start sowing, beside just liking the whole process.

Definitely not sown, Tulipa ‘Honky Tonk’ is now flowering, probably from the batalinii group. It looks like your Tulipa.



Good news, (the sad thing being that this is not ‘normal’), no ducklings were lost yet. They’re actually not in the park but right next to my home.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Nik

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #51 on: April 22, 2022, 10:50:42 PM »
Japanese maples are finally showing their leaves. This one is a 4-year old seedling, about 6 feet tall.
Connecticut, zone 7a

Nik

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #52 on: April 22, 2022, 11:04:54 PM »
I love Japanese maple seedlings. They are so variable. One never knows what you will end up with. These two are from seeds from the same tree.
I have few named varieties: Shin Deshojo, Ukigumo, Sensu, Shirazz and Rhode Island Red, but I always find the seedlings more exciting. Also, because they are unique, nobody else has them unless they are propagated by grafting or cuttings.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2022, 11:22:14 PM by Nik »
Connecticut, zone 7a

Mariette

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #53 on: April 23, 2022, 10:17:20 AM »
Yes, these maples are beautiful, and I do share Your love for them, but, unfortunately, they do not like the conditions in our garden.

Akke, the contrast between Your interesting collection of container-grown plants and the lovely sceneries in Your neighbourhood is as fascinating as enjoyable!

Arum maculatum ´Bakovici´ produces spathes of different variegation, just as the leaves.



A double Anemone ranunculoides found by the late gardeners Barbara & Eberhard Fluche.



More fully open.



Anemone nemorosa ´Alba Plena´ produces odd flowers this year.




shelagh

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #54 on: April 23, 2022, 11:59:52 AM »
Everyone posting wonderful pictures, thank you. Thought I'd do a quick run round as the wind is bitter this morning.

Cytissus ardoinii Cottage.
Maud's corner.
Narcissus rupicola on the bench at the local Horticultural Show 27.3.22
Same Narcissus rupicola this morning.
Pelargonium Frank Hedley. Brian has been overwintering this in the garage and greenhouse.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

shelagh

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #55 on: April 23, 2022, 12:03:24 PM »
Another Pelargonium that Brian has tended all winter P. Vancouver Centennial.
Peony mascula ssp. mascula.
Raised bed from both ends.
Trollius europaeous Lemon Supreme and the new shoots of the Martagon Lily.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

shelagh

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #56 on: April 23, 2022, 12:05:09 PM »
Last but not least Tiarella Spring Symphony with the snake like heads of Soloman's Seal coming through.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

Andre Schuiteman

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #57 on: April 23, 2022, 03:14:54 PM »
1. Phlox richardsonii. I received this as P. muscoides, which it certainly isn't. These cushion phloxes are not easy to identify but I think P. richardsonii comes closest. Admittedly, some botanists believe this is a synonym of P. hoodii. Near London, cushion phloxes are easier to grow in the open garden than Himalayan alpines such as androsaces, as they seem better capable of dealing with dry air and the occasional high temperatures. They appreciate protection against rain between November and March. It's a pity that the flowers are quite flimsy and last only a few days.

2. Cassiope wardii. I have tried other Cassiope species planted only inches away from this one but they all died within months, whereas C. wardii is getting better and better after three years in the same spot. Maybe this species is easier or I may just be lucky.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2022, 03:35:27 PM by Andre Schuiteman »

Andre Schuiteman

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #58 on: April 23, 2022, 03:26:13 PM »
Cytissus ardoinii Cottage.

Shelagh, this should be known as Cytisus Cottage, as it is a hybrid of C. ardoinoi with something else. Pure C. ardoinoi is a smaller plant with deeper yellow flowers. See https://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2012Feb241330043727IRG_26_Feb2012.pdf
« Last Edit: April 23, 2022, 03:39:49 PM by Andre Schuiteman »

Nik

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Re: April in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #59 on: April 23, 2022, 06:46:46 PM »
I also would like to thank everyone posting great pictures in this thread. They are all so lovely!

Akke,
Our side yard becomes violets heaven this time of year, no idea about the species, some are white.
Sadly, they all get the lawn mower treatment later on.
Connecticut, zone 7a

 


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