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Author Topic: March in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 4637 times)

Maggi Young

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #45 on: March 31, 2024, 10:07:08 PM »
Not sure if that is pure Paeonia mlokosewitschii- but I am amazed at how early it is!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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ruweiss

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #46 on: April 01, 2024, 09:20:28 PM »
I also think, that this plant is a hybrid, but I like it for the colour and the early flowering.
Most of the other Paeonia species are in buds, this year earlier than in former years.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Rick R.

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #47 on: April 02, 2024, 11:36:45 PM »
Regarding Phacelia campaularia, I grew in from seed way back in 2007, the seed from Thompson & Morgan.  Not really knowing what I was doing, I planted it inside first, in Minnesota (45° N lattitude).  I started them in early April in a south window, they sprouted easily, and immediately went into flowering mode with just two true leaves!  I kept cutting the flower buds off, but the increase in plant size was minimal, until I was able to plant outside.  With continued debudding, they produced little mats of foliage 1-2 inches high.


I've grown them a few times since, when I was able to find seed; they have always been precocious but not quite so extreme.  Never been as low growing either, or with as deep a blue color.
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Mariette

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #48 on: April 04, 2024, 05:13:01 PM »
Robert, thank you for your kind comment.
Mariette, sorry that I didn't add the name to this plant. It is Bergenia ciliata, the flowers start very easy and get
usually destroyed by frost. The leaves start later and grow really big until early frosts in autumn kills them.

Thank You, Rudi! I wasn´t sure if it´s this bergenia. I tried it twice, but it didn´t like my heavy clay.

@ Robert: Thank You for Your explanation regarding the inferior growth of my Phacelia campanularia. Obviously, some plants need the Californian sun to do them justice. Though I was very pleased with the brilliant colour of the flowers, nothing like this over here!
Your erythroniums are really beautiful! My E. multiscapoideum shows more mottling of the leaves than in about 10 years before, I wonder why.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2024, 05:20:30 PM by Mariette »

ashley

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #49 on: April 05, 2024, 11:52:09 AM »
There will be people with far more shrub expertise than me, but might it be Salix gracistyla 'Mt Aso' ?

Very belated thanks for your suggestion Redmires, which I'll follow up 🙂
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Robert

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Re: March in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #50 on: April 05, 2024, 07:14:41 PM »
Regarding Phacelia campaularia, I grew in from seed way back in 2007, the seed from Thompson & Morgan.  Not really knowing what I was doing, I planted it inside first, in Minnesota (45° N lattitude).  I started them in early April in a south window, they sprouted easily, and immediately went into flowering mode with just two true leaves!  I kept cutting the flower buds off, but the increase in plant size was minimal, until I was able to plant outside.  With continued debudding, they produced little mats of foliage 1-2 inches high.


I've grown them a few times since, when I was able to find seed; they have always been precocious but not quite so extreme.  Never been as low growing either, or with as deep a blue color.


Hi Rick,

Your experiences cultivating Phacelia campanularia at 45 N are very interesting. Based on what you have related, it appears that there is a way forward with the cultivation of Phacelia campanularia in far northern latitudes. With the correct sowing time and cultivation techniques it might be quite easy.

As for off-type seed lines….  Maybe it is the farmer in me? Given my goals with horticulture, as much as possible, I maintain my own seed lines, which includes many perennial species. After all, in agriculture the quality of a seed line can make the difference between survival and perishing. My goal is to maintain as much genetic diverse as possible, yet maintain purity to species or varietal characteristics. Genetic diversity needs to be maintained with out-breeding species and excessive inbreeding is a poor strategy for maintaining in-breeding species. Maintaining quality seed lines requires time and precise effort, however the rewards, for me, are worth the time and attention.

I do get off-type pale blue Phacelia campanularia seedlings that need to be rogued-out to keep my deep blue seed line well maintained. The percentage is small and to me is an indication that I am maintaining a reasonable degree of genetic diversity in this seed line.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
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