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Author Topic: Kalmiopsis leachiana  (Read 280 times)

Diane Whitehead

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Kalmiopsis leachiana
« on: April 22, 2022, 01:25:13 AM »
This was discovered in 1930, by Lilla Leach of Portland, Oregon, in the Siskiyou Mountains along the border between Oregon and California.

How gratifying to see a plant named for its discoverer instead of for some European botanist who has never travelled in the area.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

MarcR

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Re: Kalmiopsis leachiana
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2022, 03:37:26 AM »
This was discovered in 1930, by Lilla Leach of Portland, Oregon, in the Siskiyou Mountains along the border between Oregon and California.

How gratifying to see a plant named for its discoverer instead of for some European botanist who has never travelled in the area.

I agree. I was under the impression that the discoverer was always entitled to name the discovery. Is that not true?
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F  -9.4C.  Rainfall 50"+  but none  June-+September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight.  soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus.  Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix.

Vinny 123

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Re: Kalmiopsis leachiana
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2022, 07:34:12 AM »
I was under the impression that naming for the discoverer had been discouraged for quite a few years - hence it being so rare as to essentially never happen.

Maggi Young

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Re: Kalmiopsis leachiana
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2022, 12:12:07 PM »
I was under the impression that naming for the discoverer had been discouraged for quite a few years - hence it being so rare as to essentially never happen.

 Not the experience I've seen. There are many rules about accurate naming but naming after the discoverer is not excluded.
 Example: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46621092
"Herb found in a waterfall

Prof Aiah Lebbie discovered an unusual plant clinging to rocks near a water fall in Sierra Leone. He collected a specimen and sent it to Kew, where it was identified as a new species. The plant, Lebbiea Grandiflora, has been named after him. "
« Last Edit: May 06, 2022, 12:21:55 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Vinny 123

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Re: Kalmiopsis leachiana
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2022, 01:27:44 PM »
I said discouraged, not excluded.

It was a long while ago that I read or heard this mentioned, so have no real idea where it was.

Species named after a person other than the discoverer remains moderately common.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2022, 01:30:09 PM by Vinny 123 »

 


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