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Author Topic: Trees in parks and gardens 2012  (Read 11366 times)

Paul T

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #30 on: April 04, 2012, 07:35:11 AM »
Thanks Zvone.

I thought it looked like it..... such a good plant.  in my late teens we planted one at home and it was most impressive.  That bronze new foliage, large leaves, and those excellent flowers.  There are a couple of towns an our or two from Canberra that have them planted as street trees.  They look great when they are in flower, and in leaf they give such a good shade on a small tree.  If I ever get a property with some space I will definitely plant one...... I just wouldn't have the space here.  Doesn't stop me keeping on buying Magnolias though, does it?  ::)  I definitely need some acreage so that I can plant more of the things I would grow here if I had the space.  ;D

Maureen,

That Prunus yedoensis is lovely.  The dark centre on the pale flowers is striking, isn't it.  Thanks for showing us.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

zvone

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #31 on: April 04, 2012, 01:46:05 PM »
Thanks Zvone.

I thought it looked like it..... such a good plant.  in my late teens we planted one at home and it was most impressive.  That bronze new foliage, large leaves, and those excellent flowers.  There are a couple of towns an our or two from Canberra that have them planted as street trees.  They look great when they are in flower, and in leaf they give such a good shade on a small tree.  If I ever get a property with some space I will definitely plant one...... I just wouldn't have the space here.  Doesn't stop me keeping on buying Magnolias though, does it?  ::)  I definitely need some acreage so that I can plant more of the things I would grow here if I had the space.  ;D

Hi Paul!

Very good thinking.
I am convinced, that you will find best solution for you and your garden.

Best Regards!  zvone


Ways, when it is only more beautiful with every next step!

Zvone's links to his blogspot seem not to work anymore - but you can see his photo albums here:
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Paul T

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #32 on: April 04, 2012, 02:46:57 PM »
Zvone,

It's just that those pesky banks want their money back, and with interest and everything.  If they just gave it away to me it would be SO much easier to get that acreage. ;D
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Michael J Campbell

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #33 on: April 04, 2012, 03:11:31 PM »
Paul, you should come and live here, the Government keep giving away billions of Euro (our money) to unsecured bond holders,German banks, and seemingly anyone who asks them, except us of course. :'(

Paul T

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2012, 03:12:06 PM »
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Giles

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #35 on: April 05, 2012, 07:21:02 PM »
Magnolia stellata:
'Jane Platt'
'Waterlily'
Prunus incisa 'Mikinori' (better than 'Kojo-no-mai' re petal shape and colour)

zvone

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2012, 07:02:34 PM »
Hi!

Malus from My Garden!



MORE PICTURES: http://zvonem.blogspot.si/news/

Best Regards!  Zvone
« Last Edit: April 22, 2012, 01:15:39 PM by zvone »
Ways, when it is only more beautiful with every next step!

Zvone's links to his blogspot seem not to work anymore - but you can see his photo albums here:
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johnw

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #37 on: April 18, 2012, 06:49:21 PM »
We've been looking at trees in a friend's garden today.  Quite taken by the Prunus maackia which positively glowed in the sunshine.

The Quercus robur seems to be a bizarre aberrant Fastigiata with branchlets that seem to coil about.

1 Phellodendron amurense
2,3,4 Prunus maackii
5 Quercus robur Fastigiata but Contorta or Spiralis too!
6 Stewartia pseudocamellia

johnw
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 11:14:37 PM by johnw »
John in coastal Nova Scotia

johnw

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #38 on: April 18, 2012, 10:59:16 PM »
This seemed very bizarre to me, dense clusters of pine cones on Pinus thunbergii.  Is this typical?  A very ungainly tree even here in a very windy spot where one would think it would take on a picturesque habit as it does in Japan.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Maggi Young

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #39 on: April 19, 2012, 04:16:53 PM »
I think that Pinus thunbergii can commonly have clusters of ten or so seed cones, and these "mega-clusters" are not so very unusual, I think. They are certainly spectacular and must seem like a squirrel delicatessen  :)

The Japanese Black Pine is used extensively for bonsai work, of course, where it can attain the most elegant shapes.... but I do not think I have ever seen such pineapple like cone clusters on one of those trees. 
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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johnw

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #40 on: April 19, 2012, 04:53:20 PM »
Maggi  - In the last photo I count about 25 cones in view so one might triple that!

I'm thinking of those tiny rock islands close to shore one sees in Japan with lovely flat-topped pines with growth swooping in one direction. Here the trees are quite ugly with no sense of direction.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Maggi Young

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #41 on: April 19, 2012, 04:59:53 PM »
Yes, that wind-swept growth is what is tried for in the bonsai..... very attractive look.  Maybe they just need the climate and ambience of their home islands to conform?


As I well know, there is all the difference in the world between wind-swept and " blown to smithereens"  :-X  We see the same "problem" here with junipers etc that do not get enough shaping from a single direction of wind and just end up looking messy.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2012, 05:02:03 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Palustris

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #42 on: April 19, 2012, 05:12:01 PM »
Just to prove that we do have trees in our garden as well as alpines. This is my favourite. Not planted by us as it must be getting on for 100 years old. a Perry Pear. The pears are like horse chestnuts in texture, but they were allowed to rot and were used once upon a time to make Perry (Pear cider).

Maggi Young

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #43 on: April 19, 2012, 05:14:38 PM »
That's a venerable tree, Eric. And still flowering well.
If the pears are that hard you'll certainly need your hob-nail boots on to trample them for the perry, then?  :-\ Could still be delicious!
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johnw

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Re: Trees in parks and gardens 2012
« Reply #44 on: April 19, 2012, 05:22:26 PM »
Eric  - What a magnificent tree!

Maggi - We can supply the wind, in fact this tree is near one of the windiest spots in the county but alas it's a mess as are its siblings.  Same here with upright junipers, horrible looking things; I've heard it said warm nights induce these to shut down growth at night which seems to contradict logic.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

 


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