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Author Topic: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 68177 times)

annew

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2007, 10:30:21 AM »
Mon Dieu! What a flower! Does it require its companion, like you see donkeys in fields with horses sometimes?
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Lesley Cox

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2007, 10:52:27 PM »
My God! ;D
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Lesley Cox

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2007, 11:00:27 PM »
That's a lovely Colchicum Fermi. I've never heard of that name before. The more I look at your `Julia Jane' seedlings, the more I feel that my JJ (bought for a large price) is a seedling FROM JJ as it has the same sort of pleat in the corolla as if too much material was cut out and rather than remove it, the dress maker has make it into an extra tuck at the top, if you know what I mean. In which case, mine are seedlings of a seedling so that will be interesting. I still think `Atlas Gold' is the best of the lot.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Otto Fauser

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2007, 12:15:18 PM »
Lesley, this afternoon at our monthly meeting of the Ferny Creek Horticultural Soc. Fermi brought a pot of Narcissus Mon Dieu in flower-it really is outstandingly beautiful & made me exclaim mein Gott! so I added it on my "I want list"
                 Otto.
Collector of rare bulbs & alpines, east of Melbourne, 500m alt, temperate rain forest.

Lesley Cox

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2007, 11:13:23 PM »
Just had a quick look at the Wisley Alpine Log. What a good idea but it means even more minutes each day spent in front of a screen instead of out in the garden. I must learn some discipline.

Otto I guess you'll have a better chance of persuading Fermi to part with one or two bulbs of `Mon Dieu' than I will. Good luck.

Here is the latest batch of seedlings from the cvijicii/veluchensis cross. First the "father," then the babies. "Mother" is up above in this thread. These are seedlings from a single seed pod. Tremendous variation with several showing the pinkish tone which is so pretty.

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You'll be pleased, I hope, to know that the seed from your Fritillaria imperialis `Rubra Maxima' which Tim sent to me, is germinating now.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Paul T

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2007, 06:15:43 AM »
Lovely pics Lesley and Fermi.  I'm just catching up after a few days of not visiting. 

Lesley,

My ssp alexandrii is rather different to your pics.  Nowhere near as round in the petals as yours..... I really like the form of yours much better.  I have taken pics of mine in the last coupel of days so will try to upload some.

Fermi,

I too am admiring the 'Mondieu' but am not actually asking you for any of them.... a friend of mine gave me a small one of that earlier this season.  Definitely looking forward to it even more now, although I am doubting that mine will flower for me this year.  'Julia Jane' has been fantastic for me this year, giving more uniform flowers than it often does.  Mine also has that pleating effect at times Lesley, but I think it is usually due to a warm patch as the flowers are emerging.  They then don't unfurl quite as well as they should.  We've had cooler last month during the day, so the flowers are emrging a bit better this year than some years.

Otto,

your garden is sounding just wonderful.  Many of the Galanthus here aren't yet in flower, although they are mostly in bud.  Been a hard summer for a lot of things this year.

Some Crocuses are finally putting in an appearance, after the majority of the autumn species failed to flower.  korolkowii, minimus, corsicus (one pot only, very early), imperatii ssp suavoleons, first of the tommies etc are starting to flower.  I am particularly pleased with minimus flowering, as I nearly lost it last year for some reason.  2 pots of it nearly completely rotted out, but thankfully the tiny corms have recovered enough to start flowering again.

Although I may not get up here as often as I want to, I am thoroughly enjoying the pics as always.  Thanks everyone!!
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Paul T

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2007, 11:27:23 AM »
OK peoples..... I have finally got some pics together to post.  These Crocus are out at the moment in my pots. 

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As you can see, my Crocus biflorus ssp alexandrii is somewhat different to Lesley's.

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Crocus corsicus (somewhat earlier than normal, just in one pot)

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Crocus minimus recovering nicely as mentioned.  I just love the outside of the flower.

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This is an Iris histrioides hybrid as far as I know.  I don't have a name for it for sure, but I think it was identified on a list at one point as 'Angel's Tears' or something along those lines?  Anyone care to try for a name?  Much more substantial than the Iris reticulata varieties.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2007, 11:30:08 AM by tyerman »
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Paul T

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2007, 11:38:57 AM »
And a few more pics.....

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This is just a few of the Cyclamen coum colour variants out at the moment.  Such a cool species, one I wouldn't be without nowadays.

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This is my first ever non-white double seedling hellebore.  I've had double whites selfed, but this is the first one I've flowered from a cross that is double.  It will be interesting to see what it looks like next year, as the first flowering is by no means a good indicator of their eventual quality (or lack thereof)

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This is a white anemone centred seedling I have flowering now, only the second ever anemone centred seedling I've ever had.  The first opened a couple of weeks ago and was what would best be described as a reverse picotee, spotted heavily dark purple throughout with a pale edge and dark nectaries etc.  Again, will be interesting to see these all next year to see how the flowers stabilise.

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This is Lapierousia oreogena which is flowering for me for the first time this year from seed.  Small flowers, but the colour is spectacular.  The photo doesn't do it justice, but it gives you the basic idea.  I've been pollinating so hopefully will get some seed set.

I'll also post some Galanthus pics, but I will go down and find a Galanthus thread in the specialist sections to post them.

I hope y'all enjoy the pics now, y' hear!!
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

annew

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2007, 10:12:09 PM »
Your pics are just what we need while we're getting used to uncomfortably hot weather again, Paul. 8) It reminds me what's inside these little bundles of fun that I'm repotting just now.
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mark smyth

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2007, 11:56:09 PM »
Lesley if I ever get to NZ you better count those stunning crocus hybrids
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Lesley Cox

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2007, 01:25:33 AM »
Paul I have that form of C. b. alexandri too, perhaps even darker, almost black, on the outside. It's always a bit later. I really like the purple Lapeirousia. I haven't seen it here.

I don't think it was a warm patch that affected my `Julia Jane.' We had snow, ice and heavy frosts around then. It has ALWAYS flowered like that, about 7 years I think.

I have a pretty lemon flower on a hellebore, quite single and unmarked, from, so the seed was labelled, `Ashwood Apricot.' Will try for a pic later in the day when I've cleaned up the rest of the mess from my ancient washing machine, which spilled its gu.... inards onto the floor last night.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

fermi de Sousa

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2007, 06:49:16 AM »
Well, we've had a reasonably good weekend including our garden club at Ferny Creek in the Dandenongs having a "Buy/Swap/Sell" afternoon where we bought more than we should've!
Otto brought along a couple of iris which he wanted me to post to the Forum.
First is I.rosenbachiana "Varzob"  and the second is a white reticulata which has been available as "White winogradowii"; both are introductions by Janis Ruksans, I think.
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2007, 06:59:06 AM »
Here are a few new flowers in the Rock garden at Redesdale.
First the first flower on Aquilegia grahamii which appears true to name, though a bit small.
Next, the Babiana pygmaea which I also posted last year, but I split up the clump in summer, so not as many flowers.
And third a scilla which I got as S.greilhuberi but it may be S.hohenhackeri or something like that!
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

fermi de Sousa

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2007, 07:07:35 AM »
Just to be boring, here are some more "hoops".
First, "Mitimoto", another Glenbrook hybrid;
The clump of "Ianmon" opening a few more flowers and the frst one showing the lightening effect;
Another clump of "Mondieu" but growing in the rock garden instead of a pot;
and a final look at the Seedlings of Julia Jane; I've realised on closer inspection that some flowers are a slightly deeper yellow and are a bit flatter, closely approximating their "mum"! I guess I must've planted out the entire pot of seedlings (possibly a whole 2 or 3 originally!) without separating them; I'll try to sort them out next year.
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Paul T

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Re: Early spring in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #29 on: August 06, 2007, 11:46:00 AM »
Fermi,

Great pics!!  Love those two Iris from Otto.  That white in particular I desperately want!!  ;D  I just love the reticus and histriodes types.  The only white I've come across was 'Natascha' which didn't do well at all for me unfortunately.  Ottos is far superioir in form, presumably having a fair whack of histrioides in its parentage judging by the size of the petals.

Love that Babiana.  I think mine may have finally gone to the Goddess, but I haven't checked for sure.  Such a large flower for such a small plant.  Always a bonus!!

Lesley,

The seed for the Lapierousia oreogena came from NZ!!  Bill Djik I think it was, via the ABA seedlist from memory.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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