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Author Topic: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 29556 times)

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: November 05, 2009, 12:46:17 PM »
The Spyloxene is awesome Bill !!  :o :o
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

Ragged Robin

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: November 05, 2009, 05:50:25 PM »
Both look fascinating Bill
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

Gerdk

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: November 05, 2009, 07:07:02 PM »
Bill,
Im so fond of the Spyloxene. Never saw a living plant here in Germany. Is it an easy growing plant? How long does a single flower last?

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
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Armin

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: November 05, 2009, 08:21:14 PM »
Bill,
the Spyloxene is mouthwatering. Certainly it has genes of Crocus mathewii ??? ;D
Best wishes
Armin

Paddy Tobin

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: November 05, 2009, 08:32:06 PM »
Bill,

You are really treating us to some fabulous plants. It is a great joy to view them even if I don't grow them. Many thanks, Paddy
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

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Roma

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: November 05, 2009, 08:55:12 PM »
Lovely Spiloxene, Bill.  I am so envious when I see so many wonderful southern hemisphere plants you can grow.  I used to grow a few at work but did not take many home when I retired.  Partly due to lack of space and partly due to insufficient heat for winter growers.
I grew Spiloxene capensis for many years.  It flowered twice with many years in between.

Gerd, I found the flowers lasted a few days but only opened a few hours per day - maybe 10am till 2pm. 
Roma Fiddes, near Aberdeen in north East Scotland.

Tecophilaea King

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: November 06, 2009, 02:35:26 AM »
Well sure, I'll take the risk Bill, if you have plenty seed. The whole of life's a risk, it seems to me. ;D
Lesley, would you like a couple of seedlings of the Wachendorfia's packet in damp moss?
Could send them next Monday if you like Fast Post.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2009, 02:37:52 AM by Tecophilaea addict »
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Lesley Cox

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: November 06, 2009, 03:11:08 AM »
That would be nice thanks Bill.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: November 06, 2009, 05:36:48 AM »
Lesley, is this still your current postal address? How old is this label?
Drop me a PM for your current postal address please?
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: November 06, 2009, 08:33:31 AM »
Bill,   Im so fond of the Spyloxene. Never saw a living plant here in Germany. Is it an easy growing plant? How long does a single flower last?    Gerd
Gerd, good to hear from you and show an interest in these beautiful species.
As far as the cultivation of the Spiloxene species is concerned, most grow naturally in milder climates (like New Zealnd, Australia and South Africa), in slightly damp areas in full sun or semi-shade.
The flowers of the sun-loving species close each night and open before noon on warm, sunny days, they generally last for a few days, but are replaced on a regular intervals for the next few weeks.
The peacock colours of the Spliloxene capensis flowers, (sometimes called golden stars) can vary in colour, including white, golden yellow and rarely pink.
In the more colder climates, growing in a glass or greenhouse is perhaps the only way to grow these beautiful plants.
I will post a few more Spiloxene species pictures of the ones we grow.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Tecophilaea King

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: November 06, 2009, 09:10:12 AM »
I am also pleased everyone is enjoying the rare and unusual flowers we grow in the SH, and get as much satisfaction posting them.
Much appreciated  :) :) :)
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: November 06, 2009, 09:42:33 AM »
Iris chrysographes (the black iris) is another stunning plant and one of my favourites.
Today the first flower opened up from seed planted 2-3 years ago.Probably the prettiest species of the subseries.
Needs sufficient moisture in the soil during the growing period.
Full sun and plenty of room are essential for good development.
A rich, slightly acid soil is ideal, but it will also grow in a slightly alkaline soil.
Basically, I. chrysographes grows better in more humid regions than in those with a dry continental climate.
Not easily photographed, hopefully will show the very dark almost black colours.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #42 on: November 06, 2009, 10:52:14 AM »
Lesley, is this still your current postal address? How old is this label?
Drop me a PM for your current postal address please?
Sorry Lesley, just discovered your postal address in your posting last month, my apologies  :-[ :-[ :-[
« Last Edit: November 06, 2009, 10:58:40 AM by Tecophilaea addict »
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Gerdk

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #43 on: November 06, 2009, 06:34:01 PM »
Bill, Thank you for showing all these stunning Spiloxene species.
New to me that the genus is found in Australia and NZ also.
Do they need a dry resting periode?

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Paul T

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #44 on: November 07, 2009, 07:36:52 AM »
Lovely, Bill!  Great pics. 8)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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