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Author Topic: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 29554 times)

Tecophilaea King

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #60 on: November 10, 2009, 11:04:12 AM »
And the annual pic of Ranunculus parnassifolius, a few more blooms each year. I'm hoping for some more seed as well. The first is in flower still in its seed pot, from 2007. Just one came through then a lot more came up in 2008 which is why I didn't disturb the first one.
Lesley, seeing your Ranunculus picture reminded me when I walked the famous, most beautiful track in the world, the magnificent Milford track, 3 years ago with my brother in November.
Has anyone on this forum ever walked this spectacular scenic rich track? A once in a lifetime experience.
Anyway here are some pictures I snapped while walking along this track.
Lesley, with your alpine knowledge, you could perhaps mention a few of the plants in the pictures. Thanks.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Tecophilaea King

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #61 on: November 10, 2009, 11:11:37 AM »
Just a few more of those spidery hybrid Hippeastrum crosses between H.cybister, H.aulicum, H.papilio, and H.vittatum, flowering today.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Tecophilaea King

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #62 on: November 10, 2009, 11:37:49 AM »
BTW: this is where I went for a shower, after a long exhausted 8 hour walk, cool and refreshing  ;D ;D ;D
I was standing back at least one kilometer when I snapped this picture.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2009, 11:39:38 AM by Tecophilaea addict »
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Gerdk

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #63 on: November 10, 2009, 01:09:40 PM »
Thank you for the advice Bill!

The Milford track must be dreamlike!

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Lesley Cox

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #64 on: November 10, 2009, 07:38:53 PM »
Bill the Celmisia is perhaps C. verbascifolia and the Ourisia may be O. macrophylla but I'm NOT sure and David or Dave will know better than I. The Ranunculus is, of course, R. lyallii.

Gerd, the Milford Track is billed (sorry) as "The Most Beautiful Walk in the World" and I doubt if many would disagree. It's a stiff walk over, I think 3 days or maybe 4, staying in very good huts at night and you can either take a large back pack or have it taken for you (more expensive). Nowadays it's necessary to book maybe 2 or 3 years in advance if you want to do it at the most popular time, through late spring/summer. Fabulous plants and utterly magnificent scenery. You need to be fit but small children have done it and adults in their nineties.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Gerdk

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #65 on: November 10, 2009, 08:28:51 PM »
Gerd, the Milford Track is billed (sorry) as "The Most Beautiful Walk in the World" and I doubt if many would disagree. It's a stiff walk over, I think 3 days or maybe 4, staying in very good huts at night and you can either take a large back pack or have it taken for you (more expensive). Nowadays it's necessary to book maybe 2 or 3 years in advance if you want to do it at the most popular time, through late spring/summer. Fabulous plants and utterly magnificent scenery. You need to be fit but small children have done it and adults in their nineties.

Thank you Lesley - I really would like to do this trip. Please remind me in 2032 when I am in my nineties - hoping I am somewhat fitter then as in my sixties.  ;)

Gerd
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Lesley Cox

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #66 on: November 10, 2009, 09:09:01 PM »
I know the feeling Gerd. Looks as if I'll need to join you in 2032. :D
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Rogan

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #67 on: November 11, 2009, 08:16:56 AM »
Lesley, I'm amazed how similar your Ranunculus lyallii looks to our Ranunculus baurii - perhaps not the flowers so much as the leaves - both are amazing plants! R. baurii grows in moist, elevated sites in the Drakensberg.
Rogan Roth, near Swellendam, Western Cape, SA
Warm temperate climate - zone 10-ish

Lesley Cox

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #68 on: November 11, 2009, 08:36:56 PM »
You're right Rogan, the leaves are quite similar. In R. lyallii they are very thick and almost leathery and they hold a lot of water from which deer have been known to drink - before munching them to obliteration! Ours too, comes from moist, elevated positions over the Southern Alps and the wetter side of the main divide.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

fermi de Sousa

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #69 on: November 12, 2009, 04:43:28 AM »
It was Remembrance Day here yesterday, so I took these poppy pics this morning!
177474-0177476-1

177480-2177478-3


cheers
fermi

Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #70 on: November 12, 2009, 10:38:25 AM »
Fermi, what a great thing to do, your poppy photos are wonderful.
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #71 on: November 12, 2009, 06:27:16 PM »
Bill the Celmisia is perhaps C. verbascifolia and the Ourisia may be O. macrophylla but I'm NOT sure and David or Dave will know better than I. The Ranunculus is, of course, R. lyallii.

Gerd, the Milford Track is billed (sorry) as "The Most Beautiful Walk in the World" and I doubt if many would disagree. It's a stiff walk over, I think 3 days or maybe 4, staying in very good huts at night and you can either take a large back pack or have it taken for you (more expensive). Nowadays it's necessary to book maybe 2 or 3 years in advance if you want to do it at the most popular time, through late spring/summer. Fabulous plants and utterly magnificent scenery. You need to be fit but small children have done it and adults in their nineties.

looks lovely! but 'booking' for a hike is shocking enough for me, 2-3 years in advance is mind-boggling.. is it private land or a park with restricted access? of course no point letting so many people in that all you see is hikers, rubbish, and trampled plants...
there is a hiking trail apparently in southern alberta in Dinosaur Provincial Park which must be paid for, but that's because of fossils; the plants can be seen elsewhere for free...

Susan

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #72 on: November 12, 2009, 07:32:18 PM »
Accommodation is very limited on the Milford track.  It is administered by the Dept of Conservation and goes over some quite high alpine passes - overseas visitors often underestimate the rapid change of weather in New Zealand in alpine areas, with often disastrous results.  There have been a number of deaths this year.  It is within a National Park, and unlike places in Europe there are no chairlifts or cafes along the track.  The only way out if you injure yourself is by helicopter - weather permitting!

Check out the following site: www.milfordtrack.net/


Susan
Dunedin, New Zealand

David Nicholson

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #73 on: November 12, 2009, 07:39:07 PM »
.........there are no chairlifts or cafes along the track. 


WOT! no cake!!?????? ;D
David Nicholson
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Susan

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Re: November 2009 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #74 on: November 12, 2009, 07:48:53 PM »
Of course there is cake - but you have to carry it in yourself ;D

When we did the Routeburn track, we had to carry our own food and take out our own rubbish.  This meant no cake, but had the whisky in a flask and (close your eyes if this is offensive) wine in a can.  It was an Australian red and I have to say, you had to be pretty desperate to drink it.  It was on a special and I have never seen it since, obviously not a great hit, even with trampers!

Susan
Dunedin, New Zealand

 


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