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Author Topic: Fungi in Bulgaria....Гъбите от Гората - Лоша или Добра  (Read 13325 times)

mark smyth

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Stephen the name is the same as yours chanterelles
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
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When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Hans J

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Hi Chris + Simon ,

we ( my wife and I ) have just looked your pics .....please be carefull !
The only really good is Boletus edulis ...all other are not woth for collecting or danger !!!

....in Germany we say :
You can eat all fungi .....but sometimes only one time !!!
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Hristo

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Olga,
That sounds superb, onion and cream.......
Hans J, if I collect any more I will run them past my neighbours, they are collecting and drying theirs out for winter!
Hristo passed away, after a long illness, on 11th November 2018. His support of SRGC was  much appreciated.

Stephenb

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Stephen the name is the same as yours chanterelles

I've googled a bit and various names seem to be used including Trumpet Chantarelle, Autumn Chantarelle, Yellow Foot and Funnel Chanterelle (this is what the Norwegian name, traktkantarell, means). Ordinary Chantarelle is also abundant here, but appears much earlier in the autumn. There are also a couple of closely related species which are more local in their distribution - Craterellus cornucopioides, the Black Trumpet (http://www.mushroomexpert.com/craterellus_cornucopioides.html) and Craterellus aurora, the Yellow Trumpet (http://www.mushroomexpert.com/craterellus_aurora.html).

I had a quick foray in the woods yesterday afternoon (there's now some light snow on the ground) and there were enormous numbers of this mushroom (difficult to spot initially as they look like leaves). Within half and hour I'd picked several kilos and after a night in the oven with the door ajar at 40C,  they're now fully dry.

Stephen
Malvik, Norway
Eating my way through the world's 15,000+ edible species
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Hans J

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Chris ,

We have often here in Germany or Austria the problem with visitors from other countries ...they goes here in the wood and collecting all what they get .....
Collecting fungi is in my eyes really difficould and only specalist with a microscope can say what it is exactly -we have here in each bigger town in my area a office where you can go and they looks for the fungi if all is well ....after this you can eat it !
.....but we have here also every year dead peoples after eating fungi ......
....and dont forget : fungi can store radioactivity ...since Tschernobyl is this a problem!!!
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Stephenb

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A couple of pictures, the first Trumpet Chantarelles en masse in the woods yesterday, the second from a market in Stockholm a few weeks ago, lots of stalls loaded with Chantarelles and the darker Trumpet Chantarelles as well as bilberries etc.
Stephen
Malvik, Norway
Eating my way through the world's 15,000+ edible species
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Hans J

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this here is the 'work' of my wife from today ( collect in the woods of Black Forrest )

Cantharellus cibarius

...and so we had a very fine diner  :D
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

mark smyth

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wow look at those sellers
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Lesley Cox

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I also like the pattern of the stonework on the ground. :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Otto Fauser

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I would pay almost any prize for fresh Chantarelles and Steinpilze =Boletus edulis .as both do not grow naturally here in Australia and so far to cultivate them in captivity has failed .
If only I could afford to travel to Europe more often and savour those mushrooms !!
   
     Otto.
Collector of rare bulbs & alpines, east of Melbourne, 500m alt, temperate rain forest.

mark smyth

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It's a bit like this, Lesley. Imprinted concrete copies can be madehttp://www.bomanite.co.uk/images/European-Granite-Fan-large1.jpg
« Last Edit: October 13, 2009, 10:57:18 AM by mark smyth »
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Lesley Cox

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Are they realy THAT good Otto? :)

Yes Mark, I suppose with a little imagination and the right tool anything can be done with concrete.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Are they really THAT good Otto? :)

Yes Mark, I suppose with a little imagination and the right tool anything can be done with concrete.

Lesley, I think yellow chaterelles, fresh from the wood are truly scrumptious!!

Mark: the Swedish Market stone patterns are surely formed by real (granite ?) cobbles.... setts or cassies as we call them ?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

mark smyth

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yes of course. I was just showing what can be done with boring concrete. I should have explained better
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Olga Bondareva

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Yellow chaterelles - these ones?


Otto
I heard Boletus edulis grow well in South Africa. May be you could try in Australia.  ;)

« Last Edit: October 13, 2009, 11:19:30 AM by Olga Bondareva »
Olga Bondareva, Moscow, Zone 3

 


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