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Author Topic: Phrymaceae 2023  (Read 896 times)

Robert

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Phrymaceae 2023
« on: March 04, 2023, 09:45:16 PM »


Despite the cold and stormy weather, a few of our early Phrymaceae species are starting to bloom. A few of my F2 generation plants of Diplacus douglasii started to bloom about a week ago. With a few sunny days this week other plants started to bloom. This fine specimen started to bloom a few days ago and appears to be exceptional. I will keep watching and evaluating this plant.



Diplacus pictus started blooming a few weeks ago, however the open flowers were damaged by the windy and stormy weather. With another set of sunny days recently more flowers have started to open.



Each season I evaluate the seedlings for numerous attributes such as height, leaf coloration, blooming sequence, pest resistance, and general durability in the garden to name a few. Flowers are an obvious consideration. Diplacus pictus appears to be closely related to Diplacus mohavensis, which for me raises all sorts of possibilities. What genetic possibilities are within a species can frequently be surprising.

[Jasmin]:  We grew some Diplacus pictus in the open garden last year.  They still suffer from insect predation, so they are not yet “at home” in the garden “wilderness”.  Robert’s main goal is breeding for longer bloom season, and he is fascinated by the anthocyanin color pigmentation in the leaves.  At this time, these are taking precedence.  Naturalization to garden conditions usually occurs as part of the happy accident while the plants seed out and he misses gathering a few seeds, or when there are enough examples to risk a few in the ground.  Seed accidents are always the best method; the plants themselves have their wisdom.

Currently, we do not have sufficient numbers of Diplacus douglasii; however, even when the day comes that we do have some to trial in the garden, it is such a precious little jewel, we will always have a container or two to display.  It is easy to not realize and even forget how tiny some plants and their flowers really are when our only conception of the plants and their flowers is from a photograph.  Diplacus douglasii is one such tiny example; however, it faithfully explodes with color for an amazing length of time when given the right soil and conditions.  We always enjoy placing containers along our most frequented pathways for maximum joy. 
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2023, 02:56:09 AM »
Robert,

When I first saw this thread, I was somewhat confused. I am in the habit of thinking of Diplacus as a subsection of Mimulus in Scrophulariaceae. Recent reading has removed the confusion. In any case they are interesting & beautiful plants. Thank you for the thread.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2023, 04:25:25 PM »
Thank you for pointing out an alternative taxonomic nomenclature. The point is to impart information about plants in a simple but concise way. Jasmin still uses Mimulus. There are likely advantages, and appropriate times to use each method, however sometimes it is difficult to avoid confusion. So, thank you for added another degree of clarity.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2023, 09:15:54 PM »


My F2 Diplacus douglasii seedlings are progressing well this season. The small plants are producing a profusion of flowers. This tiny species is a prefect candidate as a container plant, obtaining a maximum size of 7 cm in diameter and 6-8 cm high. As pictured, when the plants bloom well they create a very pleasing display. This annual species is found at low elevation throughout northern and central California. My seed line was obtained from seed gathered on plants growing at 500 feet (152 meters) in El Dorado County, California. I have also observed this species at low elevations in Colusa County, California, in the interior Coast Range.



My F5 line of Erythranthe bicolor is now coming into bloom. The original seed accession came from 5,025 feet (1,532 meters) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, in El Dorado County, California.

This season I am hoping to make another seed accession from a much lower elevation site in El Dorado, County. Diplacus kelloggii shares the same habitat at this site and I hope to obtain seed from this stunning species at the same time. The Caldor Fire decimated the forest habitat at this site and in the surrounding area. Salvage logging occurred near this site after the Caldor Fire. I have not been able to visit the site since the salvage logging took place, however salvage logging generally destroys whatever capacity the ecosystem had to restore itself to its original climax state before the fire. This area was prime habitat for many beautiful and interesting species. Three native Viola species thrived in this area, Viola sheltonii, Viola glabella, and Viola lobata ssp. lobata. Trillium angustipetalum and other fine species also found their home in this area. On going undesirable shifts in climatic patterns are taking place that will additionally hinder the ability of the ecosystem to recover to it original climax state.



Now that we have had a pause in the rain, Diplacus pictus is coming back into bloom again.



Diplacus pictus is a fine annual species. My original seed came from a commercial seed source. I am finding some genetic variability in this seed line, however I would like to obtain new seed lines from wild sourced seed. One reason I enjoy working with our California native flora is that it is much easier to obtain new and varied genetic material to work with.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2023, 02:40:34 AM »
Robert,

Do you know of anyone who offers seed of Diplacus douglasii, &/or pictus?
If not, may I purchase some from you if or when yours set seed?
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2023, 04:52:13 PM »
Hi Marc

I am not a businessperson, just an average gardener.  :)  Ginny Hunt, Seedhunt, offers Diplacus pictus, or at least she did in the past. I highly recommend Seedhunt to anyone interested in growing California native annual species. I have consistently received seed of high quality.

I have never seen Diplacus douglasii on Seedhunt’s seed list, however it might be worth asking. Calflora has a plant-seed finder. It appears that everything including the kitchen sink is offered by a multitude of venders. I highly recommend Calflora for those interested in learning more about California native species, however I have never bought anything using their plant-seed finder, and I admit that I am very skeptical about such things. The California Native Plant Society has a similar plant-seed finder. Like the situation with Calflora, I can recommend the California Native Plant Society as a source of information about California native plants and ecosystems, but I have reservations about the plant-seed finding scheme.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2023, 09:21:28 PM »
Robert,

Thank you. I will try your suggestions.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2023, 06:13:44 PM »


Currently in our Sacramento garden, Diplacus pictus is in full bloom. This season for the first time I have noticed a few random seedlings blooming in the open garden. Generally I grow this species as a container plant, however each season I trial some out in the open garden. Having this species reseed in the open garden is a major step forward. I look forward to a season when they consistently seed out in the open garden with (or without) help on my part.



I am always testing combinations of plants to see what I enjoy. In this container Diplacus pictus is growing with Erythranthe bicolor. I am getting very selective with the plants I save seed from. I now have lines that have been selected for floriferous qualities, fastigate growth habit, decumbent growth habit, and disease resistance.



This is a very floriferous selection of Erythranthe bicolor.



Here a nice stand of Diplacus douglasii is growing with a fastigate selection of Erythranthe bicolor.



I am only at the F2 generation of plants and I am already making very good progress with Diplacus douglasii. Most of the plants grown this season have bloomed profusely. I will also be evaluating the plants for prolonged blooming season, disease resistance, insect resistance, and compact plant habit.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2023, 05:33:49 AM »
Robert,

Lovely display!
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2023, 07:06:33 PM »

 
For our Sacramento, California garden, Erythranthe guttata is an annual or short-lived perennial species. This species seeds itself freely around our garden. Good forms of this species can be extremely showy. This specimen is a chance seedling that appeared this season in our garden. It is far more robust and floriferous than most other forms of this species that we have grown to date. The seed came from native plants growing in the ditch at the front of our Placerville, California property.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2023, 07:17:53 PM »


Erythranthe guttata puts on a tremendous blooming display in our garden. The plants generally continue to bloom for an extended period of time. In addition, this species seeds about in our garden quite freely. Our plants generally behave as annuals, however with additional attention they can behave as a short-lived perennial. I try to encourage the best plants to continue on as perennials. I am slowly developing stronger, more persistent perennial forms of this species for our garden.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Phrymaceae 2023
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2023, 06:15:03 PM »


Some forms of Erythranthe bicolor bloom for an extended period of time. I am actively selecting for this quality.



The first flowers of Diplacus aurantiacus (left) are now starting to open in our Sacramento, California garden. This species is perennial and will bloom well into the summer months. This species is extremely drought and heat tolerant; however it is tolerant of summertime irrigation provided the soil drainage is excellent. Diplacus grandiflorus, D. aurantiacus, and other native Diplacus species have been crafted into an array of colorful hybrids. They have been around for decades and are readily available at local nurseries. Personally, I have a preference for the wild species in our Sacramento garden, although some of the newer color forms are certainly tempting. Some of the hybrids still retain their wild appearance and would likely fit in well with our naturalistic garden theme.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

 


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