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Author Topic: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 5772 times)

shelagh

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: August 24, 2021, 09:55:09 AM »
Cohan I never investigated where it came from Botanically but I would never have thought of Canada.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

Rick R.

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: August 24, 2021, 09:38:58 PM »
That's much too pretty to be Palace Purple, Shelagh.  Palace purple isn't silvery in the leaves like that, and has a different way of present the flowers, that are a dirty cream color.  Palace Purple is a workhorse in perennial gardens, in my opinion, and unrefined.  Sorry to say I don't know what cultivar you have, but it is a nice one!
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Mariette

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: August 27, 2021, 09:07:05 PM »
Thank You, Cohan! This is a begonia to survive in a shady border: B. taliensis.



Roscoea purpurea



Closer.



Pollia miranda



Geranium nodosum


cohan

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2021, 03:04:53 PM »
Thank You, Cohan! This is a begonia to survive in a shady border: B. taliensis.
Roscoea purpurea
Closer.
Pollia miranda

Geranium nodosum

Nice set, Mariette, great colour on the Geranium.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2021, 02:17:27 PM by cohan »

Rick R.

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2021, 02:50:02 PM »
Hi Mariette,

As usual, yours (and everyone's) posts are great additions here, and your detailed pics give a lot of insight.

I am wondering if you (or anyone) can tell me about Pollia japonica.  I grew some from seed this year, btw found they do not need scarification (or presoaking), and now I'm wondering if I really want them in the garden.  I really don't have any place that they can wander.  How long will they stay clumping, do the clumps just get larger rapidly or do they have long stolons (like sumac).
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Mariette

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2021, 07:44:45 PM »
Hi Rick,
Im sorry, but this is my first attempt to grow a pollia. Judging from what I read, Pollia japonica is an avid spreader and more suitable for generous woodland-situations.

Hi Cohan,
thanks for Your kind comment. Obviously, You own a much larger and more attractively situated garden than I do. Your lovely, natural looking plantings are something I admire everytime You show pics. As I cannot achieve anything of similar beauty, I have to put my focus on details, Im afraid.

cohan

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Re: August 2021 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2021, 02:22:08 PM »
Hi Rick,
Im sorry, but this is my first attempt to grow a pollia. Judging from what I read, Pollia japonica is an avid spreader and more suitable for generous woodland-situations.

Hi Cohan,
thanks for Your kind comment. Obviously, You own a much larger and more attractively situated garden than I do. Your lovely, natural looking plantings are something I admire everytime You show pics. As I cannot achieve anything of similar beauty, I have to put my focus on details, Im afraid.

Thanks, Mariette! We all  work with what we have! There are advantages to smaller gardens- you are more able to keep on top of everything-- I have planted too much, and never really catch up on weeding! and of course, outside the actual garden, there is a lot fo work all year-- mowing, managing fallen leaves, shovelling snow....lol

 


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