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Author Topic: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 18371 times)

Paul T

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #60 on: December 27, 2007, 08:59:48 PM »
Mark,

If I still had my master seed list that I lost when my computer died a couple of years ago I could have told you.... actually I may still have some in a pot so could be able to find out (I write everything on the side of my pots with paint pen).  It has been a few years now.  Flowers for me every year and I just love it as it is such a delicate little thing.  Thanks again!!
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

mark smyth

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #61 on: December 29, 2007, 07:54:29 PM »
Paul I know someone with a white Dahlia merckii if you are interested for next year
« Last Edit: December 29, 2007, 08:05:03 PM by Maggi Young »
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Paul T

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #62 on: December 29, 2007, 08:54:36 PM »
Hmmmm.... would be rather cute I'd imagine.  Of course seed may not continue the white trait?
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

David Lyttle

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #63 on: December 30, 2007, 09:41:15 AM »
After a steady rain today I took a quick look round my garden.

Here is one of my favourites, the white from of Primula alpicola originally grown from Wisely seed. It is seeding freely through the border where I planted it.

The second plant is Hebe dieffenbachii originally grown from seed collected from the Chatham Islands. It is also seeding itself through my garden.

The third plant is a red Achillea. The white and pink forms are fairly prolific weeds here and grow along the roadside but this one is fairly well behaved.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Paul T

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #64 on: December 31, 2007, 09:56:02 PM »
David,

Love that stunning red Achillea!!!!!  Beautiful!!  And well behaved as well..... makes a change for so many of the Achilleas.  ;D  Must keep an eye out for a good red one like that, as the colour is brilliant!!

Here's a few things just to finish off 2007 for me.

Agapanthus are in full flower here at the moment.  Almost all varieties are out by now, only a couple still to start opening.  Some regard them as weeds but I love them and have quite a few different ones now.

Wahlenbergia gloriosa is the floral emblem of the Australian Capital Territory (where Canberra is located).  I only managed to find it in a nursery last year and I am pleased it has apparently thrived in the garden.  The flowers are a bit over an inch wide, and about 6 to 8 inches tall.  The leaves are low rosettes, spreading underground by fine stolons.  Fits quite well into the "alpine" bracket by appearances, but no idea how cold it takes.  I think it grows up in the Brindabellas (mountain range just to the west of us) so it is probably rather cold hardy too).  I'm glad I found it, and glad it is doing so well for me.  Much bigger and showier than the other Wahlenbergias I've seen (although the small double flowered one is pretty impressive!!)
« Last Edit: December 31, 2007, 10:00:32 PM by tyerman »
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

mark smyth

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #65 on: December 31, 2007, 10:03:12 PM »
surely you mean c10am in 2008?
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Paul T

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #66 on: December 31, 2007, 11:42:01 PM »
Photos were taken in 2007 so it was finishing off what I started posting yesterday and never got finished!!
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Lvandelft

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #67 on: January 02, 2008, 04:04:51 PM »
Paul, David's achillea seems to me A. mill. Paprika.
If not so, Paprika is still one of the best.
Problem with most of these achillea is that after some years they don't keep their color.
Or the color gets totally different, because they seed themselves very easy.
Luit van Delft
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Sadly Luit died on 14th October 2016 - happily we can still enjoy his posts to the Forum

Paul T

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #68 on: January 02, 2008, 09:58:23 PM »
like the good old bearded iris that supposedly "all turned white" (or whichever colour), which is impossible for them to do.... except that you can get a seedling in there which then outgrows the parent until it has taken over the patch.  I've heard of Iris and Gladiolus "reverting" to white so often from people.  I may even try to find Achillea 'Paprika' if it is here in Aus.  I worry bout the Achilleas because so many of them are feral pests, but that one in a nice pot somewhere with that glorious colour would be great.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

rob krejzl

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #69 on: January 02, 2008, 10:51:16 PM »
Paul,

but 'reversion' is such a hardy perennial, where would we be without it: roses 'revert' when the rootstock is allowed to outgrow the graft. Lilies 'revert' when seedlings or unflowered bulblets/scales (beware 'bargain' bags) start flowering in a clump. It all helps keep nature mysterious and kinda spooky dontcha think?
Southern Tasmania

USDA Zone 8/9

Paul T

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Re: December 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #70 on: January 03, 2008, 12:52:29 AM »
 ;D  8)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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