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Author Topic: Oregon in March  (Read 5475 times)

Tony Willis

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #30 on: March 17, 2010, 07:28:56 PM »
Fred I take it this is what you wanted to see. very interesting but definitely difficult to appreciate with the plants growing through an endless mass of dead decaying pitchers.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #31 on: March 17, 2010, 07:50:02 PM »
Fred,

No, I didn't visit any Darlingtonia this time.  Three roads that
go off Highway 199, that DO have Darlingtonia are:  Eight
Dollar Mountain Rd (between Selma and Cave Junction), Lone
Mountain Rd (at O'Brien) and French Hill Road (in California,
halfway between Gasquet and a redwood park)).

Here is an old photo from Lone Mountain Rd., mid-March 2007.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

fredg

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #32 on: March 17, 2010, 09:09:45 PM »
Oh my Diane, red adult pitchers, that's a rarity. ;D
Was that a stand of them?
Fred
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Mansfield Notts. UK Zone 8b

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #33 on: March 17, 2010, 09:19:37 PM »
  P. tridentata covers 340 million acres and varies a lot,

Not "rare and endangered" then. ;D
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2010, 09:35:20 PM »
I don't know whether conditions cause the different colours
in Darlingtonia.

Here's the red patch, in March.  They grow in cold seeps,
sometimes in very dry areas.

The green ones were on French Hill Road in August, from an
area more generally moist - note the Adiantum.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

fredg

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #35 on: March 17, 2010, 11:00:33 PM »
If the red one is in cultivation it's being kept very quiet.

I've been growing Darlingtonia for 25 years and never had red adult pitchers.

Fred
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Mansfield Notts. UK Zone 8b

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Tony Willis

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #36 on: March 17, 2010, 11:34:47 PM »
Fred,

No, I didn't visit any Darlingtonia this time.  Three roads that
go off Highway 199, that DO have Darlingtonia are:  Eight
Dollar Mountain Rd (between Selma and Cave Junction), Lone
Mountain Rd (at O'Brien) and French Hill Road (in California,
halfway between Gasquet and a redwood park)).

Here is an old photo from Lone Mountain Rd., mid-March 2007.

Diane mine were taken at the reserve on the Eight Dollar Mountain road in May
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

fredg

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #37 on: March 18, 2010, 06:34:09 PM »
Must have been great to see the bog Tony.
Wasn't it a little early to see the pitchers in full force though?
May for me would be flowers.

Looking at my stock of plants now I could do with a bog that size to plant them out  :D
« Last Edit: March 18, 2010, 07:44:57 PM by fredg »
Fred
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Tony Willis

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #38 on: March 18, 2010, 06:55:41 PM »
Fred  do not get me wrong it was wonderful and seeing them was one of the main aims of our trip but the scale is enormous and I think it must take more than a year for the old pitchers to decay and so there is a huge mass of rotting vegetation with the new growth and flowers rising above it.At the Eight Dollar Mountain site there is raised boardwalk which gives a view from above.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

fredg

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #39 on: March 18, 2010, 07:48:44 PM »
I think it must take more than a year for the old pitchers to decay and so there is a huge mass of rotting vegetation with the new growth and flowers rising above it.

It certainly does take a long time for the pitchers to completely die down in cultivation Tony, as for decaying
I'd give it several years altogether.

I have to rely on my views of the wild plants with the likes of this
Fred
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Mansfield Notts. UK Zone 8b

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Diane Whitehead

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Re: Oregon in March
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2010, 02:55:24 AM »
Kathy Allen has identified some of the plants I didn't know.  Check back
to page one.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

 


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