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Author Topic: wildlife  (Read 185726 times)

Vinny 123

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1725 on: December 21, 2021, 09:29:55 PM »
A flock of whooper swans has taken a rest on the frozen pond. They have stayed some time now. The pond froze over yesterday so maybe they will leave .
(Attachment Link)

A staging post for their trip to the Uk? Maybe.

Vinny 123

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1726 on: December 21, 2021, 09:38:03 PM »
Snowy owls do not stay in one place. They migrate from one place to another. The "Norwegian" snow owls belong to the same population as the ones in Siberia, and even Alaska.

They do not migrate - they are irruptive - they follow food, or die. Moving away from poor food sources can mean moving Km or 100's Km.
The pair that landed on Fetlar in 1967 were fleeing starvation, almost certainly in Scandanavia.
In many areas their populations very closely follow lemming populations which rise and fall massively over periods of a few years. In lemming years snowys can rear 6-8, or more chicks, every pair. In crash years most pairs will fail to even produce eggs and any pairs that do will rear just one or two chicks, if any.

Hoy

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1727 on: December 22, 2021, 10:29:52 AM »
A staging post for their trip to the Uk? Maybe.

Yes, maybe. Depends on the winter weather. Some years they stay all winter.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Hoy

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1728 on: December 22, 2021, 10:43:11 AM »
They do not migrate - they are irruptive - they follow food, or die. Moving away from poor food sources can mean moving Km or 100's Km.
The pair that landed on Fetlar in 1967 were fleeing starvation, almost certainly in Scandanavia.
In many areas their populations very closely follow lemming populations which rise and fall massively over periods of a few years. In lemming years snowys can rear 6-8, or more chicks, every pair. In crash years most pairs will fail to even produce eggs and any pairs that do will rear just one or two chicks, if any.


Yes, they follow the food. In Norwegian they use the word "trekker" (migrate) to describe the movement of birds between Norway and Taymyr, Russia. This movement depends on the size of the population and the amount of food.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

cohan

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1729 on: December 27, 2021, 07:26:36 PM »
Jeepers-- I slack on my viewing for a while, and everyone has had all sorts of wildlife around-- great photos and info, everyone!

Gerdk

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1730 on: February 02, 2022, 09:03:59 AM »
First blackbird song noticed this morning - 7.30 a. m./Solingen/Germany

Spring is just around the corner!

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

brianw

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1731 on: February 16, 2022, 07:15:13 PM »
This Pheasant either wanted to come in; or more likely admiring itself. We have 2 varieties; with and without the white collar. The resident has no collar. This is the challenger; with the collar.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2022, 07:18:05 PM by brianw »
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England

Robert

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1732 on: February 19, 2022, 06:47:51 PM »
Brianw

Jasmin:  Actually, the pheasant is stressed, miffed, and giving an initial warning display to his rival, the reflection of himself.  I recommend hanging tulle (a meshlike fabric net--in case you are not a seamstress or tailor) over at least the lower portion of the window door.  You will still have the view, and there will be less danger the bird will harm himself attacking the “rival”.  Concussions and death are the most prevalent risks birds suffer from crashing into or fighting images in windows.  The layers of their skulls are thin and supported by struts, leaving air space.  The whole skeletal anatomy is lightweight for flight; however, this increases bird vulnerability to lethal injury.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1733 on: March 23, 2022, 08:19:27 PM »
Sorry no photos.

In the past few weeks I have seen several black-tailed deer, about 50 turkeys, 2 orange sided towhees & several Stellar's jays on my property.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F  -9.4C.  Rainfall 50"+  but none  June-+September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight.  soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus.  Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix.

Roma

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1734 on: April 20, 2022, 10:15:09 PM »
I have 2 bird feeders I fill with sunflower hearts.  Most of the winter a small flock of Siskins has been hanging about, with a few Goldcrests and Chaffinches. Robins and blackbirds feed on the ground.  Quite a lot of seed gets spilt and is cleaned up by Wood Pigeons, sometimes Crows and this trio of Pheasants.  The Pheasants are rather flighty, especially the hens.  I was amazed how well this photo came out as it was taken at an angle at least a metre from a double glazed window.  You can see the middle bird has her beady eye on me even that far back from the window.  The last warm spell we had most of the Siskins disappeared but they came back when it turned colder.  It is warmer again and I have seen very few small birds yesterday and today.  There is little spilt seed so nothing to attract the Pheasants now.



 
Roma Fiddes, near Aberdeen in north East Scotland.

Akke

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1735 on: May 28, 2022, 03:40:28 PM »
It’s not going to get much wilder in my containers.
705700-0
A good deal, the ants get a few Crocus specioses seeds and in return give a demonstration how strong they are, even walking up a plant label.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

MarcR

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1736 on: May 29, 2022, 03:41:59 AM »
Today we had an elk walk the length of our driveway and pause in front of our garage for about half an hour. The flock of turkeys has increased to more than 60.
Now that the Weigelias are in full bloom, we are starting to see Hummers and Western Bluebirds. My Halesia carolina is now in bloom. Its branches intertwine with Laburnum [also blooming] and several Rhododendrons to produce a riot of color.
I am seeing a pale blue butterfly that I can't identify.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F  -9.4C.  Rainfall 50"+  but none  June-+September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight.  soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus.  Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix.

ian mcdonald

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1737 on: May 29, 2022, 10:53:11 AM »
Marc, have you any photos. of the Elk etc?

shelagh

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1738 on: May 29, 2022, 10:53:38 AM »
In Tockholes, Lancashire elevation 230m last Sunday saw a stunning yellow butterfly which I think was a Brimstone.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

ruweiss

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Re: wildlife
« Reply #1739 on: May 29, 2022, 09:12:31 PM »
A colony of antlions live since last year in the sand plunge of an unused frame in our garden.
It is situated under a conifer, which keeps it very dry. The wire mesh keeps the cats away
from using it as a welcome toilet.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

 


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