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Author Topic: Bulb Log 15 Anemone  (Read 1482 times)

claykoplin

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  • Point Barrow Alaska
Bulb Log 15 Anemone
« on: April 27, 2010, 10:19:32 PM »
Ian,  I noticed on your gravel parking space picture a beautiful, blue, blooming anemone.  Which variety is it that survives your fickle winters and might provide an opportunity for my own waterlogged gardens in coastal Alaska?  The varieties I've tried from tuber always rotted away in winter freeze/thaw cycles, while the anemone multifida and sylvestris have prospered.  I was so excited to have gentians bloom last fall after three years from seed (though the gentiana bhutanic has not bloomed despite gaining a huge size, and I can't seem to find any information or pictures of them) and add bold blue that the anemone would be a welcome addition.

Thank You
in Cordova, Alaska

Ian Y

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Re: Bulb Log 15 Anemone
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2010, 09:30:03 AM »
Clay,

It is Anemone blanda that has grown from seeds that I scattered and now there are a delightful range in shades of blue now flowering.

I find Anemone blanda a very adaptable species that in our garden will grow in both woodsy and scree type conditions so it may work for you.



Ian Young, Aberdeen North East Scotland   - 
The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.
http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/bulblog.html

claykoplin

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Re: Bulb Log 15 Anemone
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2010, 02:21:09 AM »
Thank You, I'm excited to try again now that I've got a little experience - the anemone de caen and blanda I tried several years ago all rotted away.  I'll doctor up my seed request list for next year.  The one thing I've learned about seed is that sowing it outside in the ground rather than pots adapts it to my climate much more effectively than winter sowing in pots in my cold greenhouse, which is that much more effective than planting mature bulbs from outside sources directly outside in the ground (a failure almost every time, they drown and rot).

I repotted(first time repot) and plunged my fritillarias outside in clay pots close to my concrete foundation throught the winter for the first time this winter and had unbelievable success; several fritillarias are budded up for the first time from 2004 seed, my first year of SRGC exchanged seed, and the rest increased in size after being same for last 2 years.  Now maybe I can claim true amateur gardener status, and will havce some open blossoms to photo when I arrive home tomorrow.  CK
in Cordova, Alaska

 


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