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1
Hepatica / Re: Hepatica 2022
« Last post by Leena on Today at 06:31:03 PM »
Thanks, I hope the few 'Walter' I have will survive the brutal January. We usually don't have very low temp. for such long periods of time.
It seems that the beginning of February will bring some relief but remains to be seen.

Here it has been milder but temperatures going up and down has resulted in ice in some places. Mostly it is still snow, but I'm a bit worried about all ice in beds.
I hope your February will be better!
2
Galanthus / Re: Galanthus Jan 22
« Last post by Leena on Today at 06:28:09 PM »
Mariette, did I understand correctly that those are your own grown snowdrops? Congratulations.
'Green Eyes' has very green leaves, quite special.
3
Galanthus / Re: Galanthus Jan 22
« Last post by Maggi Young on Today at 03:45:03 PM »
From 'Discover Scottish Gardens' - news of the  2022 Scottish Snowdrop Festival
698703-0

The Scottish Snowdrop Festival is now live! With events happening across the country in dozens of gardens, woodlands and estates, visitors are invited to enjoy the sheets of white flowers and collections of special varieties of mid-winter’s loveliest bloom.

The Festival runs throughout the peak of snowdrop season, from Tuesday, 25 January until Friday, 11 March and during that time visitors can discover snowdrops growing in all kinds of places, from Teasses Estate in Fife, where there will be opportunities for candlelight walks in woodlands filled with snowdrops, to 10 Pilmuir Road West in Forres where a specialist collection of more than 150 different snowdrop varieties will be on display.

Click here for the full list of Snowdrop Festival Events

No matter the weather, you can experience the joys of Scotland's gardens and woodlands this winter. There is a range of incredible gardens open all year round offering quiet space to reflect, the chance to connect with nature and family, and even adventure for the thrill seekers. Whether you're looking for a day out, a romantic weekend getaway or a wonderful place for your next staycation, visit www.discoverscottishgardens.org/days-out and make a plan that is sure to offer fantastic memories for all.


As always, please plan ahead to ensure the garden/grounds are open and to check whether tickets must be booked in advance. Please also be aware of the weather forecast and how this may affect events.

Garden of the Season
Cambo Gardens - Kingsbarns, Fife


Cambo House and Estate is one of the most exciting gardens in Scotland. It mixes high-end horticulture and atmospheric woodlands, with a busy calendar of craft fairs, moonlight walks and artistic events. Its reputation as a garden grew from the 1980s onwards when Catherine and Peter Erskine brought in pigs to clear ivy from the 70 acres of woodland and allow the snowdrops that grew there to flourish. They also built up a collection of rare and specialist snowdrops and they started selling bulbs ‘in the green’ to other snowdrop lovers. Read the full article here.

Tickets: £6.50/Free

The gardens are open daily 10am-4pm.

Website: www.discoverscottishgardens.org/garden/cambo-gardens
 
Wake up to Scotland's winter wonders
698707-2

 Discover Scottish Gardens hosts a number of fantastic hotels, B&Bs and self-catering providers who have beautiful gardens and grounds for you to enjoy during your visit. Whether it's moody skies, hidden secrets of the woodlands or perhaps trails of snowdrops and the quiet of winter gardens, visit our website to explore and book some of Scotland's best escapes and getaways.

4
15 cm is quite ok. Maybe cushions filled with plastic bottles are more suitable for you.
5
since i read you, i have been looking for suitable polystyrene pieces, but they are less and less used (and so much the better for the planet, no doubt).
I also have this problem that the water holes in my garden dry up every summer almost now and I have completely lost my sphagnum moss and the plants that went with it.
maybe this is a solution for some plants:what minimum raft size did you make?
I found a small piece of styrofoam about 15 cm in diameter...

6
General Forum / Re: Rhino + Two West compatibility
« Last post by Graeme on Today at 12:24:55 AM »
Thank you Graeme.

I’ve actually been persuaded to go for the slightly larger 12’ wide model, as it’ll allow a bit more circulation space and a wider central bed.

Power won’t be wired in straight away, but provision will be made for ducting, electrics board etc. from the outset so there’ll be some overhead lights and heat cables as a precaution despite our usually very mild winters. Water is already close by and it’ll be easy to run a spur in.

Will start a thread in due course and will also share what we’ve done so far.
I have been meaning to put a thread up for a while and did not want to hijack yours - I just like to see how people have their building setup :)

Two Wests is only a short drive from where I live, and I do go on occasions when I need bits and spares and have always found them to be very helpful
7
General Forum / Re: Rhino + Two West compatibility
« Last post by Matt T on January 24, 2022, 10:46:13 PM »
Matt

Yes the benches should fit as the greenhouse will be about 16'6" and about 10'4" wide

Just make sure you have power and water - all my buildings have tube lights with the switch above the doors - screwfix have/had some good deals on for 5' and 6' twin and single IP LED lights

I tend to build the benches out of wood - but we have  two decent wood yards in the area who will actually cut items for me - the Two Wests benches are the ones of my dreams.......
(my benches are 30" high - and then 6" tray on top - 36" wide)

The powder coating is superb - but again plain aluminium tends to get a grey surface and I have never had an issue with it deteriorating or rotting - I have a couple of elite buildings I have had for 35+ years and a Robinson which is older.  The glass in the Robinson is that old, it has an 'oil stain mottling' on the glass in places.

I did help a neighbour put up a Rhino last spring - as I have glass lifters and all the tools - it did go together very well and is very strong - that was a pale English green? - and she had their coloured benching as well

Will be interested to see the progress photos ;D   

Thank you Graeme.

I’ve actually been persuaded to go for the slightly larger 12’ wide model, as it’ll allow a bit more circulation space and a wider central bed.

Power won’t be wired in straight away, but provision will be made for ducting, electrics board etc. from the outset so there’ll be some overhead lights and heat cables as a precaution despite our usually very mild winters. Water is already close by and it’ll be easy to run a spur in.

Will start a thread in due course and will also share what we’ve done so far.
8
General Forum / Re: Rhino + Two West compatibility
« Last post by Graeme on January 24, 2022, 09:08:57 PM »
Matt

Yes the benches should fit as the greenhouse will be about 16'6" and about 10'4" wide

Just make sure you have power and water - all my buildings have tube lights with the switch above the doors - screwfix have/had some good deals on for 5' and 6' twin and single IP LED lights

I tend to build the benches out of wood - but we have  two decent wood yards in the area who will actually cut items for me - the Two Wests benches are the ones of my dreams.......
(my benches are 30" high - and then 6" tray on top - 36" wide)

The powder coating is superb - but again plain aluminium tends to get a grey surface and I have never had an issue with it deteriorating or rotting - I have a couple of elite buildings I have had for 35+ years and a Robinson which is older.  The glass in the Robinson is that old, it has an 'oil stain mottling' on the glass in places.

I did help a neighbour put up a Rhino last spring - as I have glass lifters and all the tools - it did go together very well and is very strong - that was a pale English green? - and she had their coloured benching as well

Will be interested to see the progress photos ;D   

9
Blogs and Diaries / Re: Plants, Ecosystems, Climate – Northern California
« Last post by Robert on January 24, 2022, 08:38:27 PM »


Sanicula bipinnatifida, Purple Sanicula, is another commonly seen Sanicula species in this area.  Both of these Apiaceae (Carrot Family) species are perennial woodland species.



Primula (Dodecatheon) hendersonii is a small-growing perennial with very attractive nodding magenta-colored flowers in the early spring.



Our Goldback Ferns, Pentagramma triangularis, are frequently seen in shaded, often rocky, sites in the Upper Sonoran Life Zone. They are a xeric, dryland species, never found growing in perennially moist sites.



Lupinus albifrons var. albifrons is a sun-loving xeric species. The best forms of this species seem to always inhabit dry, steep, south-facing slopes. This group of plants was found growing on a grassy, sunny knoll. Encroaching oaks were beginning to shade this site, thus the plants were developing a looser, more open growth habit.



Lepechinia calycina is another highly aromatic chaparral species. During cold weather this species can drop its leaves; however new growth quickly follows. The Lamiaceae (Mint Family) species frequently have highly aromatic foliage. Monardella sheltonii, another aromatic Lamiaceae, was also seen on this outing.
10
Blogs and Diaries / Re: Plants, Ecosystems, Climate – Northern California
« Last post by Robert on January 24, 2022, 08:35:10 PM »


Garrya congdonii is an upright evergreen shrub. Good forms of this species are quite handsome. The nascent pendent inflorescence appears in the late summer with the flowers opening in the spring.



A number of Chlorogalum species are native to California. Chlorogalum pomeridianum is the most common species in our region. A tall inflorescence with small white flowers appears in the late spring. The flowers tend to open in the evening and are said to be fragrant; however I have never been able to detect the fragrance in the wild or in our garden.



Agriculture, ranching, urban and suburban development, and the invasion of non-native annual grasses have, for the most part, destroyed the open prairie Bunchgrass ecosystems of California. Remnants of our native perennial Bunch Grass ecosystem can sometimes be found in and on the periphery of the chaparral ecosystem. Needlegrass, Stipa species, were once an integral part of these bunchgrass ecosystems. Pictured is most likely Stipa pulcha; however other Stipa species can also be found. A positive identification can easily be made when they are in bloom.



Sanicula crassicaulis is a perennial woodland species. The foliage of Sanicula crassicaulis is very similar in appearance to Delphinium hansenii ssp. hansenii and they can occupy similar habitat niches. Delphinium hansenii is a striking species when in bloom and was also seen on this outing.



The Oracle Oak, Quercus x morehus is a natural hybrid between the California Black Oak, Quercus kelloggii and the Interior Live Oak, Querus wislizenii. It is not a common oak; however generally a few can be seen in most Upper Sonoran Oak Woodland/ Savannah ecosystems.
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